Quantcast Getting Multiple Failures Ripping DVDs? - digitalFAQ.com Forums [Archives]
  #1  
06-13-2002, 08:56 AM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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I am attempting to rip the Xfiles season 5 DVD box set. I'm trying to use Kwag's KVCDx2 (NTSCFilm)-1cd template to put two episodes per disc. If I perform IVTC to convert 29.97fps to 23.976fps, the audio becomes seriously out of sync. I can encode at 29.97fps to maintain decent audio sync, but it stutters during the shift from NTSC to Film. However, encoding at 29.97fps ballons the filesize of a single episode to over 500 MB, compared to 259MB at 23.976fps.
Perhaps there is someone out there who is more experienced at this than I am who could shed some light as to what is going wrong, because I am pulling out what little hair I have left trying to do this!
Thank you for your time!
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06-13-2002, 11:55 AM
DrChumley DrChumley is offline
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I imagine, since the original source material was shown on television, it is in 29.97 fps, not 23.97. I may not understand this whole thing completely, but television broadcasts are not telesynced, so you can't inverse telesync them. (Again, I could be wrong.) One thing you might want to try is to use vDub to pull off the audio into a seperate file, then multiplex it after the encode...

DrC
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06-13-2002, 12:09 PM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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I just completed a test encode using the standard vcd template and the audio maintains perfect sync!
It seems I'm doing something wrong while encoding with the KVCDx2-cd1 template! Even resizing to 352x240 had no effect!
DAMN! This is gonna drive me nuts!
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06-13-2002, 12:14 PM
kwag kwag is offline
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@JBC2002:

I don't know about the X files DVD, but I record Stargate SG-1 every week from satellite, and I Inverse Telecine with an AviSynth script. So at least Stargate series, which is a television series, was shot at 24fps FILM.

When you run DVD2AVI in your X files DVD, and press F5, what % does it show for FILM? Or does it show only NTSC?

kwag
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06-13-2002, 12:29 PM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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Actually, it shows both. When encoding with your template, the audio stutters at the point where it shifts (from Film to NTSC). The audio then goes out of sync, onlt to catch up a few seconds later.
HELP
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06-13-2002, 01:51 PM
kwag kwag is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBC2002
Actually, it shows both. When encoding with your template, the audio stutters at the point where it shifts (from Film to NTSC). The audio then goes out of sync, onlt to catch up a few seconds later.
HELP
Ok. Then your source is mixed. Read here, specially the last paragraph ( Threshold: Hybrid Threshold (0-99) ):
http://www.inmatrix.com/articles/ivtcsynth1.shtml

kwag
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06-13-2002, 02:32 PM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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As an experiment, here are the parameters I've specified in the AVIsynth script:
Telecide(reverse=false,swap=false,firstlast=false, post=true,threshold=15,dthreshold=9,blend=true,chr oma=false,y0=0,y1=0)
Decimate(cycle=5,mode=1,threshold=25)
I've begun the sample encode, however; is it necessary to have TMPGEnc process inverse telecine after specifying mode 1, threshold 25 in the decimate field? Or does this just convert ALL parts of a hybrid rip to 30fps, leaving it open for TMPGEnc to IVTC? If so, will the audio not still be unsynchronized?
I apologize for monopolizing your time, and if you interpret the above statement as gibberish! I've been at this since Sunday night and my brain has turned to mush!
Thanks for your help, DUDE
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06-13-2002, 02:42 PM
kwag kwag is offline
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You're going to have to experiment with that JBC2002, as I haven't had the (Un)pleasure of converting a mixed NTSC/FILM movie
Let me know how you do.
( Guess what my brain has turned to, since I opened kvcd.net )

kwag
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06-13-2002, 10:26 PM
rendalunit rendalunit is offline
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hey JBC,

I'm doing the same sorta thang right now! I'm encoding "OZ- the first
season" and it is also 29.97 mixed film/ntsc. I encoded 4 min with this script:

LoadPlugin("C:\ENCODING\MPEG2DEC.dll")
LoadPlugin("C:\ENCODING\decomb.dll")
mpeg2source("D:\movies\OZ_SEASON1_D1\oz.d2v")
telecide()
decimate (mode=1, threshold=50)
BilinearResize(704,480,0,0,720,480)
TemporalSmoother(2,2)
AddBorders(0,0,0,0)

the audio was totally in sync when I viewed the clip in WMP (yeah I know- its only 4 min- I'm going to start the full encode after this but damn, 15 hrs est. encoding time!!)

here's some more info on the decomb plugin:

file:///C:/ENCODING/Decomb%20Help.html

I used the default "hybrid" parameters

i'll post my results of this encode if there's problems
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06-13-2002, 10:36 PM
kwag kwag is offline
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Hey rendalunit, that link file:///C:/ENCODING/Decomb%20Help.html
is pointing to your hard drive

kwag
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06-13-2002, 11:34 PM
rendalunit rendalunit is offline
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OOPS!!! thanx kwag, that's embarrassing!

I can't find the link so here's the page:

Decomb Plugins for Avisynth
(Version 3.
by Donald A. Graft
Introduction
This package of plugin functions for Avisynth provides the means for removing combing artifacts from telecined progressive streams, interlaced streams, and mixtures thereof. Functions can be combined to implement inverse telecine (IVTC) for both NTSC and PAL streams.

The term "combing" is used as a general term versus "interlacing" because interlacing is usually associated with nonprogressive streams. What look like interlacing artifacts can be seen on telecined progressive streams, so I use the term combing to refer to all such artifacts, regardless of the type of the stream.

The package automatically adapts to any telecine/capture patterns, for example, 3:2 NTSC or 1:1 PAL, and mixtures thereof, although if you want to decimate the recovered progressive stream, you have to specify the desired decimation ratio if it differs from the default 1-in-5 used for 3:2 NTSC. The recovery process is completely modeless (patternless) and does not rely on any fixed telecine patterns or phasing. None of the functions introduce a delay in the audio or video streams.

For most applications, there are no parameters to set. Some capture cards require a field swap after the recovery process and the Telecide function allows this to be specified.

The Decomb Functions

The package consists of the following functions:

* Telecide(): Recovers progressive frames but does not remove resulting duplicates and does not change the frame rate or frame count. Do not use Telecide on streams that do not contain telecined progressive frames, such as pure interlaced video. Note that a stream of PAL progressive frames that are shifted by one field will exhibit combing and can be considered a telecined stream for purposes of recovery; Telecide will easily handle this situation.

By default, Telecide runs postprocessing on the recovered frames. This postprocessing checks each frame to see if it is combed (some combed frames may come through the field-matching process [see below]), and if a frame is combed, it is deinterlaced, otherwise it is not touched. The deinterlacing algorithm is an adaptive one, that is, only the portions of a frame that are combed are deinterlaced. This means that full detail is retained in static picture areas. The algorithm for distinguishing between combed and progressive frames is extremely effective but not perfect.

To achieve inverse telecine, apply Telecide followed by Decimate.

Telecide supports an optional pattern guidance mode. Enabling this option allows Telecide to overrule the calculated field match with its predicted match based on the recent clip history. A threshold can be defined so that a large enough discrepancy between the predicted and calculated matches will reset the pattern.

IMPORTANT NOTE In some previous versions of Decomb, you had to run FieldDeinterlace after Telecide to get postprocessing. This functionality is now built into Telecide, so do not follow Telecide by FieldDeinterlace; simply accept the default behavior of Telecide. Conversely, previously you would have simply omitted the FieldDeinterlace call to disable postprocessing; now you need to explicitly tell Telecide by setting its post option to false. FieldDeinterlace is still available as a separate filter, however, to allow for standalone deinterlacing.

* FieldDeinterlace(): This filter provides the same functionality as the postprocessing function of Telecide. You can use it for pure interlaced streams (that is, those not containing telecined progressive frames). (The name refers to the fact that field mode differencing is used.) Do not use FieldDeinterlace after Telecide because the same functionality is built into Telecide.

FieldDeinterlace provides an option that allows you to specify whether all frames are to be deinterlaced or whether just frames detected to be combed are deinterlaced.

* Decimate(): Decimate 1 frame in every N, where N is a parameter and can range from 2 to 25. Decimate removes the frame that is most similar to its preceding frame in every group of N frames. The frame rate and count are adjusted appropriately. Decimate properly supports VirtualDub random access (timeline navigation).

Using the Decomb Functions -- Requirements
Telecide requires that the input width be a multiple of 4. Deviation from this will cause Telecide to throw an exception.

Do not resize vertically before applying Decomb. Decomb needs to see the original line spacing to properly detect combing.

Telecide requires YUY2 color format as input. If you are doing rips from a DVD, typically the MPEG decoder (such as mpeg2dec.dll) will deliver YUY2. If you are processing AVI files, however, they may not be in YUY2 format. In such cases, Telecide will generate an exception to notify you of that fact, and you should use Avisynth's ConvertToYUY2 function. Do not use ConvertToYUY2 if it is not required because, although it will not convert the color space, its presence in the filter chain will slow down processing.

Using the Decomb Functions -- Important Speed Tips
Avoid Converting the Color Space Be aware that converting to YUY2 from RGB is very time expensive, so don't save your AVIs in RGB. The popular HUFYUV codec has an option to convert RGB to YUY2 and you should enable that when generating AVIs with HUFYUV that are destined for Decomb processing.

Don't Postprocess Unnecessarily Try Telecide without postprocessing if you think there is a chance that you have a nice clean input stream. If you do have such a stream, you'll find that processing runs much faster without postprocessing. If you encounter combed first and/or last frames only with postprocessing off, then set the firstlast flag to true.

Don't Invoke an Avisynth Strangeness This one is very important and can easily cost you a 25% speed penalty! It appears that Avisynth has a strangeness that causes it to waste enormous amounts of time when there are no parentheses with the commands. For example, this script:

Telecide
Decimate

...will run much slower than this one:

Telecide()
Decimate()

If you doubt this, try it both ways and see. It is critical, therefore, to always include at least one parameter or the set of empty parentheses. That is why the scenarios below all are coded that way.

Use Fast Recompress If Possible If you are serving into VirtualDub for transcoding, and you don't need to do any filtering or other processing in VirtualDub, then use VirtualDub's Fast Recompress mode.

Disable Frame Displays When sending Decomb output to VirtualDub (and similar applications), disable the display of the input and output frames during processing. This will noticeably decrease processing time.

Interpolation Can be Faster than Blending If your clip requires a lot of frames to be deinterlaced, you'll find that processing is a little faster if you use blend=false.

Using the Decomb Functions -- Typical Scenarios
Simple Deinterlacing If you have some nonfilm (interlaced) source, you simply deinterlace it as follows:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("nonfilm.avi")
FieldDeinterlace()

Progressive Frame Recovery If you have telecined film (progressive) source and want to recover the progressive frames but not change the frame rate by decimating, you proceed as follows:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("film.avi")
Telecide()

Note that here Telecide does postprocessing of the recovered frames to clean up any combed frames that might have come through the field-matching process (see "Notes on Field Matching" below).

If you are curious to know what decisions Telecide is making about which frames are combed, you can use the debug option in conjunction with the DebugView utility to assess this and possibly tweak Telecide's threshold (see "Decomb Function Syntax" below).

Inverse Telecine (IVTC) If you want to do the same thing but decimate the result to remove duplicated frames (which amounts to performing an inverse telecine [IVTC] operation), you proceed as follows [NTSC 3:2 uses Decimate(cycle=5), 1:1 PAL uses Decimate(cycle=2)]:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("film.avi")
Telecide()
Decimate(cycle=5)

Disabling Postprocessing If your telecined source material is very clean, you may want to disable postprocessing to reduce processing time. Proceed as follows:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("mixed.avi")
Telecide(post=false)
Decimate(cycle=5)

Here the third parameter, post, is set to false disable postprocessing.

Inverse 3:2 Telecine with Pattern Guidance If your telecined source material is NTSC 3:2 pulldown, you can enable pattern guidance, which can make the field matching more accurate for some clips. Proceed as follows:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("mixed.avi")
Telecide(guide=1)
Decimate(cycle=5)

Refer to the syntax description for Telecide() below for more details.

Forcing Matching Reversal Some DVDs have been seen to output some out-of-order bottom fields, causing IVTC failure. This (and other similar situations) can sometimes be corrected by forcing Telecide to reverse the sense of its field matching (instead of matching on the second field, match on the first field). This is worth a try if you find that a lot of seriously interlaced frames are coming through Telecide. It may also be useful when there are a preponderance of blended fields limited to the second field.

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("mixed.avi")
Telecide(reverse=true)

Processing Hybrid Clips Some clips mix film and nonfilm content. One way to handle these is to leave them at the original frame rate and let Decimate determine what to do with the frames that would otherwise have been dropped:

LoadPlugin("decomb.dll")
AVISource("hybrid.avi")
Telecide()
Decimate(mode=1,threshold=50)

Refer to the following section and the syntax description for the threshold parameter for an explanation of the processing that will occur with this script.

Notes on Field Matching
Telecide normally does an excellent job at recovering progressive frames by field matching. There are four known source stream conditions that can cause Telecide to output frames with combing:

* Missing Fields. If a field is missing due to a bad edit, then its partner field in the source will not have a good field to match with. Use the default postprocessing to clean up the output stream.

* Blended Fields. Some streams have fields that are blends of two original film progressive frames! Some NTSC/PAL conversions can cause this, for example. Usually such a stream has a lot of these and the solution is to run postprocessing to clean up the output stream. Using the default blend mode seems to work best and the blended fields appear as blended frames, which lends a kind of motion blur and reflects the "intent" of the input stream.

Sometimes you'll encounter clips where the blended fields are predominantly in the second field. In such cases reversing the sense of Telecide's matching as described above may improve things. This reversal is always worth trying when you encounter a lot of blended fields.

I have seen streams that have blended fields in almost every frame and not limited to the first field. If this is the case, there is no point in using Telecide at all. Just use FieldDeinterlace (full=true) to treat the video as totally interlaced.

Finally, how do you tell if your stream has blended fields? Simply use the Avisynth SeparateFields function to split the fields apart and then serve the result to VirtualDub. Step through the fields and see if there are any fields that are blends of more than one picture.

* Nonfilm Frames (Hybrid Clips). Some streams, especially those captured from live broadcasts, have periods of film and periods of nonfilm. For such streams, you can either use Decimate(mode=1) as described in the scenarios section above, or you should use Telecide's postprocessing to clean up the output stream. In the latter case, it is your (difficult) decision about whether you want the final stream decimated or not.

* Hybrid Frames. Sometimes graphics, credits, etc., will be rendered at final frame rate and then overlayed on the telecined content, resulting in frames that have both progressive and nonprogressive content. For such streams, as for nonfilm frames described above, you can either use Decimate(mode=1) or rely upon Telecide's postprocessing to clean up the output stream.

By now you should be getting the idea that postprocessing is generally a good thing to do to ensure that no combed frames sneak through.

Acknowledgement
I'd like to thank Thomas Daniel for his valuable assistance during the development of this software. He not only made several valuable suggestions and pointed out useful resources, but he performed torture testing on very difficult streams and ran head-to-head tests against other available decombing software.

Members of the forum at doom9.org provided much help and encouragment.

Decomb Function Syntax
The Decomb functions use named parameters. That means you do not have to worry about the ordering of parameters and simply refer to them by name and put them in any order in the list of parameters. If you omit a parameter it takes its default value. For example, if you want to run Telecide without postprocessing and with debug enabled, you can simply say:

Telecide(post=false,debug=true)

Any combination and order of named parameters is allowed. Remember, however, that you should always include empty parentheses if you are not specifying any parameters.

Following is the syntax for the Decomb functions (replace parameter_list with your comma-separated list of named parameters):

Telecide(parameter_list)

reverse (true/false, default false) is used to reverse the sense of Telecide's field matching, i.e., instead of matching on the second field, match on the first field.

swap (true/false, default false) is required if the result of Telecide comes out field-swapped; some capture cards require it.

firstlast (true/false, default false) can be used to force the first and last frames to be recovered by cubic interpolation instead of field matching. This can be required when a field is missing at the beginning or end of the clip (PAL phase shift often causes this). Set this option to true to force interpolation of the first and last frames.

guide (0-2, default 0) can be used to improve field matching when the source clip is known to be PAL or NTSC 3:2 pulldown material. To disable this option (blind field matching), set guide=0. For NTSC 3:2 pulldown guidance, set guide=1. For PAL guidance, set guide=2.

When this option is enabled, Telecide() can overrule a field match decision and use a predicted match based on the recent clip history. The gthresh parameter (below) is used to define how large a discrepancy between the predicted and calculated field matches is required to reset the pattern. Do not enable this option unless you know that the source clip corresponds to the selected guidance mode. If in doubt, leave guide=0.

Note that this feature buffers the calculations from the 5 frames (NTSC) or 3 frames (PAL) preceding the current frame. Because of this, pattern guidance will not be effective during random frame access (e.g., while jumping around on the VirtualDub timeline). To get the benefit of this feature, play the clip straight through from a starting point; do not use random access). Of course, this is how things are done when encoding, so this limitation is irrelevant during normal operation.

gthresh (0-100, default 15) defines how large a discrepancy between the predicted and calculated field matches is required to reset the pattern. Use the debug option, if required, to appropriately tweak this threshold. The debug output will indicate which matches have been overridden.

post (true/false, default true) controls whether Telecide performs postprocessing to clean up frames that come through the field-matching still combed. Use true to enable postprocessing.

threshold (0-255, default 15) sets the combed frame detection threshold for the postprocessing. You may want to increase this value if too many good frames are being deinterlaced, or reduce it if small combed areas are not getting caught. The default is a good general purpose value. Note that this threshold determines whether a frame is considered combed and needs to be deinterlaced; it is not the threshold you might be familiar with in Smart Deinterlacer. That threshold is determined by dthreshold (below); it is the threshold for deinterlacing the frames detected as combed.

dthreshold (0-255, default 9) sets the threshold for deinterlacing frames detected as combed. Note that this threshold is the threshold you might be familiar with in Smart Deinterlacer.

blend (true/false, default true) enables blending instead of interpolating in combed areas.

chroma (true/false, default false) includes chrominance in the deinterlace calculation. When deciding which areas are interlaced, the chrominance bytes are tested as well as the luminance bytes. It is possible for pixels to have different colors while being very close in luminance, resulting in a failure to detect combing. This usually happens more often with animations. Setting the chroma option to true solves this problem at the expense of processing speed. Note that this option is equivalent to the "compare color channels" option in Smart Deinterlacer.

y0 and y1 (integer, default 0) define an exclusion band for the field matching. If y0 is not equal to y1 this feature is enabled. Rows in the image between lines y0 and y1 (inclusive) are excluded from consideration when the field matching is decided. This feature is typically used to ignore subtitling, which might otherwise throw off the matching. y0 and y1 must both be positive integers and y0 must be less than or equal to y1; if this is violated an exception will be thrown.

debug (true/false, default false) enables logging/debugging information about the filter's decisions to be printed via OutputDebugString(). A utility called DebugView is available for catching these strings.

FieldDeinterlace(parameter_list)

full (true/false, default false) chooses whether to process all frames or just the frames that are detected as combed. Use full=true to process all frames.

threshold (0-255, default 15) sets the combed frame detection threshold. When running with full=false, you may want to increase this value if too many good frames are being deinterlaced, or reduce it if small combed areas are not getting caught. The default is a good general purpose value. Note that this threshold determines whether a frame is considered combed and needs to be deinterlaced; it is not the threshold you might be familiar with in Smart Deinterlacer. That threshold is determined by dthreshold (below); it is the threshold for deinterlacing the frames detected as combed. When full=true, threshold is ignored, but dthreshold remains functional.

dthreshold (0-255, default 9) sets the threshold for deinterlacing frames detected as combed. Note that this threshold is the threshold you might be familiar with in Smart Deinterlacer.

blend (true/false, default true) enables blending instead of interpolating in combed areas.

chroma (true/false, default false) is the same as described for Telecide.

debug is the same as described for Telecide.

Decimate(parameter_list)

cycle (2-25, default 5) selects the decimation ratio, that is, decimate 1 frame in every cycle frames.

mode (0-1, default 0) determines what Decimate() does with the frames determined to be most similar to their preceding frame within each cycle. If mode=0, Decimate discards the frame. If mode=1, instead of discarding the most similar frame, Decimate() will either replace it with a frame interpolated between the current frame (usually a duplicate of the preceding frame) and the following frame, or it will pass the frame through as is. The choice between these two depends on the threshold parameter setting and on how different the frame is from its preceding frame (see below). Decimate(mode=1) is useful for hybrid clips where you do not want to reduce the frame rate but want to ameliorate the effect of duplicate frames that are emitted by Telecide() (frames that are normally removed with mode=0).

threshold (integer, default 0) When mode=1, frames determined to be the most similar to their preceding frame can be treated in two possible ways: 1) they can be blended as described above, or 2) they can be passed through if the threshold parameter is non-zero and the difference metric exceeds the threshold. By setting an appropriate threshold, you can have duplicates get blended while passing through frames that have new content, i.e., which differ significantly from the previous frame. This allows hybrid film/nonfilm clips to be dealt with intelligently: the film portions will have blends and the nonfilm portions will not. The threshold parameter has no effect when mode=0. Use debug=true in conjunction with the DebugView utility to view the difference metrics and thereby determine an appropriate threshold for your clip.

debug is the same as described for Telecide.

Copyright (C) 2002, Donald A. Graft, All Rights Reserved.
Feedback/inquiries to neuron2@attbi.com.

For updates and other filters/tools, visit my web site:
http://sauron.mordor.net/dgraft/
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  #12  
06-14-2002, 06:57 AM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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Thanks rendalunit! I'm trying another encode now.
Do you still use TMPGEnc's IVTC option with Kwag's KVCDx2-CD1 template with the Telecide & Decimate functions you specified?
In any case, let me know how your encode turns out!

Much obliged!
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06-14-2002, 12:34 PM
rendalunit rendalunit is offline
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hey JBC,
I don't use TMPGenc's IVTC-

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwag
Posted: Tue May 07, 2002 1:12 pm Post subject: [Reply with quote]
rendalunit wrote:
kwag, im sure glad I read your post because I have been using WinDVR with the little green pod [icon_smile.gif] too and have been having these same problems all along (especially the audio sync prob). Will the Win tv-Go work with the Nvidia GEforce2? or is it a tv turner/ video card all in one?

Also I'm still a little bit confused about why you use the AviSynth IVTC filter versus the one built into DVD2AVI or TMPge. Is that because it's much faster? Also if you IVTC twice will it shrink the video again and screw it up?

thanx
ren


Hi ren:

The WinTV GO is a tuner/capture board. It's not a video card.

I use AviSynth to IVTC because it is so much faster than TMPEG's internal IVTC. I only use the IVTC in AviSynth for captures. If it's a DVD conversion, and it's +95% FILM, I use the DVD2AVI built-in "Force Film" and then I don't have to IVTC.

You can only use IVTC one. If you do it twice, you will get a screwed up mpeg file [icon_biggrin.gif]

kwag
btw- my encoding failed 11 hrs into it (I got the floating decimal point error) I'm gonna try again with tmpge 2.55

Also the decomb plugins help file posted above is for AviSynth ver 3.8 <not> ver 3.cool emoticon
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  #14  
06-14-2002, 01:21 PM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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OK...........I've run into a new problem!
The encode is going well so far, however; I have two pioneers (dv333 & dv440). In order to play properly, I cannot use CQ, I have to use MVBR with a vbv buffer of 22. This EXPLODES the file size to over 500 MB!
Is there any way to lower the filesize with the above parameters without reducing playback quality?

hee-hee-hee!
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06-14-2002, 01:38 PM
kwag kwag is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBC2002
OK...........I've run into a new problem!
The encode is going well so far, however; I have two pioneers (dv333 & dv440). In order to play properly, I cannot use CQ, I have to use MVBR with a vbv buffer of 22. This EXPLODES the file size to over 500 MB!
Is there any way to lower the filesize with the above parameters without reducing playback quality?

hee-hee-hee!
Check your Pioneer 333 again. It should play 704x480 fine with the KVCDx2 template "as is". It doesn't play 352x480 correctly. Only shows left half of the screen.

kwag
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06-14-2002, 01:45 PM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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I did. It properly displays the image, but the audio sync is messed up if I don't alter the template. I may be forced to acknowledge that I can't put two episodes per disc and just encode for 1.
Oh well. Thanks for your help, everyone!
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  #17  
06-15-2002, 09:28 AM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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I think I'm finally on to something!
Here are the specs:
KVCDx2-CD1
MVBR max1350 min600 vbv22
Avisynth decomb telecide() decimate mode1,threshold40
Temporal Smoother 2,2
resize to 704x400 (to maintain aspect ratio - season 5 is in 16:9)
Encoded 1 minute sample, good resolution, video is a bit jerky, but it's not gonna drive me nuts. Sample clip averaged out to be 8832kb/minute, estimated total file size should be around 388MB. Good enough to fit 2 episodes per disc.
Will post final results on resolution and file size when complete!

JBC2002 :P
P.S.: Kwag, tell me what you think.....am I on to something here, or just wishful thinking?
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06-15-2002, 11:00 AM
kwag kwag is offline
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1,350Kbps is cutting it a little low for MAX bit rate and the resolution of 704x480
You'll see blocks on medium to high action scenes.

kwag
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06-15-2002, 11:02 AM
JBC2002 JBC2002 is offline
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What would you suggest?
352x240? Wouldn't that be blocky as well?
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06-15-2002, 11:07 AM
kwag kwag is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBC2002

What would you suggest?
352x240? Wouldn't that be blocky as well?
Try the 352x480 template. That is perfect for TV series and captures, and the MAX bit rate is 1,750.
You might also want to try the new 352x240 template. It's the first one on the left in the templates download page. That's the most compatible of all. It even passes the mpeg analysis test of VCDEasy as a standard VCD

kwag
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