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  #1  
11-17-2011, 12:53 AM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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I know I have asked about setting up a wifi network before, but for the last year or so I have managed to setup a wired network with a trendnet ethernet switch & a speedstream 5100b modem with our at&t DSL service. I have the dell 2004 windows xp service pack 2 kitchen pc in a hard wired network with my macbook pro in a bedroom. This has worked well so far, & I dont want to disturb it.

But, mom wants a kindle fire, & she wants to be able to surf the internet from her couch in another room without wires. So if she gets a kindle, I could be forced to undo my wired connection, of which was a bit of work to set up, & am reluctant to undo it as I take online classes, & need reliable steady internet access.

I have done some Googling on our particular modem; a simeons speed stream 5100, that at&t provided for us, when mom signed up for dsl service. Apparently, this modem is not easy to set up with a router, as I found this article;

http://zumaz.com/speedstream_5100B.html

at the bottom of this article, it suggests if one does not want to deal with trying to connect the modem to a separate router, was to get a combo wifi modem/router unit, & just replace our current modem with the one unit for both modem & router & wifi functionality. Replace our speed stream modem with something like this;

http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Wire...1&sr=8-1-spell

would something like this work? or am I better with a separate units; the speedstream modem connected to a standalone wifi router? like the netgear one I got? it is a netgear WNR2000 v1

i have also read & been told by at & t that they make their own combo unit, at&t 2 wire, but when I looked at some on amazon, they got bad reviews. like this one;

http://www.amazon.com/2Wire-2701HG-B...ref=pd_sim_e_3

although I would probably get wireless n, as that seems to be the most recent wifi tech.

this article also linked to this site;

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/sbc/3.1_Speedstream_5100

I have even posted in at&t support forum about this modem with a netgear router that I got cheaply & they replied;

http://forums.att.com/t5/Routers-and...m/td-p/2027129

would doing it by what at&t says work? or should I use one of the dlsr report methods? or get a combo wifi modem router unit & replace the speedstream modem altogether?

I am a bit confused as what to do, but I want to have an idea should mom get that kindle, & to avoid a big family ordeal over internet connection, like in the past, when I tried to hook up the at&t modem with an apple router.

Last edited by Sossity; 11-17-2011 at 01:30 AM.
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  #2  
11-17-2011, 01:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sossity View Post
i have also read & been told by at & t that they make their own combo unit, at&t 2 wire ubit, but when I looked at some on amazon, they got bad reviews.
like this one; http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B001AO1XME
although I would probably get wireless n, as that seems to be the most recent wifi tech.
Most of those complaints can be ignored. They fit into one of these three categories:
  1. Somebody was selling used routers as new. This has no bearing on how the unit functions. Honestly, I'd more readily believe somebody bought the cheapest one available (used, as clearly marked on Amazon) and wasn't paying attention. That's the most likely scenario.
  2. The modem "breaks" after 1 year. Most likely the modem was put somewhere that had poor airflow, or was so dusty that the unit could not breath. Modems and router get hot, and should be kept dusted and away from other host items (i.e., not on top of a host computer, behind a hot TV, etc).
  3. The person is complaining about the "G" speed being old, when clearly he/she doesn't understand that the "G" speed (at 54Mbps) is likely far faster than the DSL internet speed (5Mbps on average, or less than 1/10th what the modem/router can handle). Wireless N only matters when you're trying to push data across local computers, or reach far-away routers. Honestly, dual antennas can be more important on range.
So don't let stupid people mislead you.

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11-17-2011, 01:44 AM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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Thanks for the fast reply, I went ahead & posted this same question the premium member area, thinking that might be a better place, so sorry if you see it there as well.

So you think I should replace my modem with the at&t modem/router wifi combo unit? will this be better than the speedstream 5100 modem hooked up to a seperate router?

the one thing I liked the look of about the at&t unit is it will probably be supported by at&t should I have problems, & it may be easier to setup, because we have at&t service.

so do you think a combo wifi/modem/router unit or all in one unit in place of our modem is best?

did you see the links I linked to about the complications of connecting this particular modem to a router?
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11-17-2011, 01:56 AM
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2Wire isn't my favorite, but it's not horrible either.
As per above, most of the reviews look like they're safe to be ignored. I don't see anything valid complained about.

I would rather buy a new modem/router as opposed to fighting with a bridge. Those bridges are often a nuisance. I could do it, but anybody that's not technically savvy will hate it. I don't like bridges, even being fairly savvy at networking (LAN). I had one earlier this year that I just did not understand -- horrible modem, lousy router. The first time I've ever given up. Somebody else spent 2-3 days on it, and then it worked. I never did learn what he did.

This 2Wire you're looking at has 4 wired ports, wireless G, and acts as the modem. For you, I think this would be best.

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11-17-2011, 03:10 AM
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Our house is single story but wide & sprawling, with clutter in all the rooms, will wifi g work? our home as mentioned in other posts has old wiring, the house was built in 1954, with no insulation in the walls or ceiling.

is there a better model? if so do you know of a good one that is compatible with at&t? or would I be best to stick with an at&t model?

i see the benefits of the at&t would be (at least I hope) is that it will have the best bet of being compatible for our service.

That is correct neither i or my mom are real tech savvy when it comes to networking, we both dont know alot about it, but I need a stable, strong & consistent internet connection for my online classes.

also, as of now, my mac is on the wired network, connected with cat5e ethernet cables, could I keep my mac hooked to the at&t 2wire with ethernet? i may want to stay with a wired connection for better stability & security.

My mac is set with a fixed or static setting, that is it is not set up to get anything automatically. would i be able to keep it this way?

I attached a screenshot of how my mac is setup on the wired network.

another thing, the kitchen pc, is older & does not have built in wifi, so I need an adapter of some kind, I bought this; http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...pter&x=14&y=13 I forgot the exact model, but it is a usb adpter, that I can plug into a usb extension cord that is plugged into the back of the pc & comes around the front so I can easily plug in the wifi adapter.

will this work?


Attached Images
File Type: png Screen shot 2011-11-17 at 1.05.55 AM.png (76.7 KB, 4 downloads)

Last edited by Sossity; 11-17-2011 at 03:27 AM.
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11-17-2011, 03:36 AM
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Anything wired now can stay wired.

My opinion on this may have changed over time (I don't remember anymore), but those USB wifi adapters tend to work poorly, having tried to use several brands in several locations on several computers in the past two years. The TP-Link ones are especially crappy. Mine would overheat and drop the signal frequently. If you need WiFi in an older computer, the best solution would be to add a PCI card, if it has space. Less problems come from the cards -- especially good cards like Linksys.

You don't need wireless N, but you can get it if you want to. There's no harm in it. I'm just not sure there's going to necessarily be any benefit. I would not pay more than $20 extra for it.

The IP address may change on a new router, but the ability to keep a static IP can surely be done. Most new routers even let you reserve/designate certain IPs belong to certain computers, so nobody can steal it on DHCP (Wifi or wired).

The only problems that can happen is if several people want to watch videos at the same time. When you're doing class work, be sure mom isn't trying to watch Netflix or Youtube -- that won't work very well for you. I doubt she'll be playing XBOX 360, but that's another example of hogging bandwidth. And that's about the 'net connection, not the router/modem. DSL is generally a limit speed. What do you have -- 5Mbps?

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11-17-2011, 05:45 AM
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can you suggest some good inexpensive wifi cards for the pc? it is an older one from 2004, a Dell with windows xp home service pack 2. so it looks like a little surgery will have to be performed on the dell, open it up & install the card.

will I be able to leave the mac on the current wired settings & numbers? based on the screen shot I attached in my last post, or will I have to fiddle or change those numbers?

I am not sure exactly what the mp speed is of our DSL, how do I find this? so far, on the wired network, i have managed to do school work while dad was on the kitchen pc watching you tube, & nothing major happened, but if there are ways to keep things from getting slow at either computer that would be good.
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11-17-2011, 08:09 PM
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Does the computer have open PCI slots?

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11-18-2011, 12:15 AM
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Yes, it has according to the user manual specs, it has 3 PCI card slots, labeled PIC1, PCI2, PCI3.

bus type; PCI
PCI: 33MHz for bus speed
PCI connector size; 120 pins
PIC connector data width; 32 bits maximum

I dont know if the other stuff matters, but i put it out here just in case, it has any affect on what I am looking for.

according to my mom, she thinks the pc might some kind of internal antenna for wifi,

how & where in the book or the computer do i look to determine if I need a wifi card?
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11-18-2011, 07:30 AM
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Are the slots open, however? It does you no good if the slots are full (cards already inserted).
For that info, you'll likely have to open the computer.
Even looking at the back of the case isn't necessarily a guarantee of used/unused, so open the case and inspect it.

This one works: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B000085BD8
Linksys, $25, Windows XP only, wireless G

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11-18-2011, 04:45 PM
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Yes, I think the slots are open,

how do I tell if the pc needs a wifi card or adapter? how do I know if it has built in wifi ability or not? is there somewhere in the properties in control panel or somewhere else besides opening the pc tower to look?
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11-18-2011, 11:36 PM
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I did a google search of this modem router;http://www.amazon.com/2701HG-B-2Wire...680743&sr=8-12 that has been suggested to me her on this forum for our at&t dsl service.

I found this article or forum; http://forums.att.com/t5/Routers-and...s/td-p/2794071

It looks like people ended up downgrading to b level wifi to stop the disconnects, if I have to do this, will it cause problems if I get this wifi card;http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=A89QP6D3VDW1W for our dell pc?

I went ahead & got one new in the box & but I am a bit worried, i definitely need a stable strong internet connection as i am taking online classes, as for me, i will keep my mac wired through ethernet, but will have wireless so mom can use her kindle. Will the wireless interfere with my wired connection?
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11-19-2011, 03:06 PM
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What you need to do is buy the modem/router and see if it works properly. If not, return it to Amazon within 30 days and buy something else. Running a G wireless setup in B mode is stupid. That's a bandaid -- a peeling bandaid, at that -- and not an acceptable long-term fix.

I honestly think many of the people blaming the router in that AT&T forum are having other issues. Anti-virus and firewall software can, for example, lock up a computer this way. Most people are hesitant to blame "security" software for their problems, but it's actually one of the worst resource offenders. DSL is also not an "always on" tech like cable, so signal dips and drops are simply part of how it works.

WiFi cards, routers, etc, are all backwards compatible. B > G > N
So yes, a G card can run from B or G signals.

If the whole 2Wire conversation scares you, find something else. However, be warned: Pretty much every modem and router has people complaining about speeds, dropouts of the signals, etc. And in most cases, it's really an issue with something else. If changes by how the DSL/cable broadband company sends the signal can mess with connectivity. When somebody says that the modem was fine for X months/years, then "suddenly" started acting up -- it's the signal, not the device. Carriers are constantly changing how the signal works, and sometimes that wipes out perfect compatibility with phones, TV sets, routers, modems, whatever -- anything that can be connected to any phone/cable type signal. It's the nature of the technology beast.

--

If there's an antenna sticking out of the back of the desktop, it might have wireless.

If the Dell computer is old, from 2004, it probably does not have wireless abilities. Most computers didn't have it included until 2006 or later. Even if the old computer did have a wireless card, it's probably really crappy. Those early wireless cards were not even remotely decent, worse than modern cheapo cards. I'd suggest a $25 upgrade regardless of what it might have now.

Given how that computer is currently wired, does it even need wireless?

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11-19-2011, 05:17 PM
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Yes it does because my mom just bought an amazon kindle fire & wants to be able to surf the internet on it on wireless.

we have discussed some kind of portable computer for her, she wants to be able to surf the internet from her couch, & not sit in the kitchen computer where there is little privacy.

She was looking at netbooks at one time, & I told her she could use one at her couch, & although clunky, I could set it up within the wired network I set up, as netbooks have ethernet ports, but now that she has a tablet with wifi capabilities, she wants to be be able to use the internet without wires, she does not like my idea of a wired network. She will go with it reluctantly if the wifi does not work, but she prefers wireless.

I am happy with the setup now, I have my laptop in my room with ethernet from the dell in the kitchen, the dell has obtain IP adresses automatically, & I have the mac on a static IP address, that is different from the speedstream modem IP address we have now. It is stable & has worked for over a year now, although it is primitive, it has worked.

this is what I have set up now based on this discussion; http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r246...pedstream-5100 I did what one of the posters suggested, setting up my mac with a static IP Address;

this is an excerpt from that discussion;

said by Sossity:
So I recently thought I would go a simpler route & go with a wired network. I bought a netgear 5 port ethernet switch, with the idea of plugging in the speed stream modem & kitchen PC into it, & them my mac in another room with Ethernet cables

their reply
With only the devices above you'll need to configure the tcp/ip info on each computer
The modem must be configured to make the internet connection for this to work as intended
You should do this with only one computer at a time once all computers have the tcp/ip info configured you can connect all the devices
Here's a link to a "how to" page if it's needed
http://www6.nohold.net/Cisco2/ukp.as...articleid=3998
Here's the tcp/ip for three computers

First computer
Ip address: 192.168.0.60
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Dns server: 192.168.0.1

Second computer
Ip address: 192.168.0.61
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Dns server: 192.168.0.1

Third computer
Ip address: 192.168.0.62
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Dns server: 192.168.0.1

I recently posted in the dsl reports forum about the change to this setup & their reply; http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r265...e-modem-router
an excerpt from this;

said by Sossity:
My question is, will I be able to keep my mac on the Ethernet wire with its static IP address that I set it up on?

their replies;

reply 1
By default the 2WIRE will have a IP address of 192.168.1.254 and hand out DHCP IPs in that range. Which at first will F-Up your whole LAN.
You need to make one PC get a IP automaically, using DHCP, and connect only that PC to the modem.
Then type in 192.168.1.254 in a browser windows. This will bring you to the modem/router setup pages. Then change the default IP address to that of your LAN (192.168.0.254) and set the modem/routers DHCP pool range outside what you are using for static IP.
In all honesty there is NO reason to set static IPs on computers. Only on Printers and the like so their IPs never change. With the 2WIRE that just got installed at my place of work it has the option of LOCKING in IPs that have been handed by the DHCP server.
Setting the computers to a static IP mean that if you move it, as in a notebook, to a different network/LAN it will not get a proper IP address for that network/LAN. And or in your case changing out a modem/router those IPs could be in the DHCP pool range (not a good idea) or using a different IP range (as in your .0 to .1).

reply 2
Changing to the 2wire will force you to make some changes to the computers or the 2wire......
Here are two ways to do the modem change
If you want to keep the current static ip's as they are that can be done by making a configuration change to the 2wire only
You can also change the dell pc and macbook so that they use dhcp instead of the static ip's

Last edited by Sossity; 11-19-2011 at 05:52 PM.
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11-19-2011, 06:31 PM
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The Dell system being wired or wireless makes no difference on whether a Kindle/iPad/etc has wireless access. If it's wired now, it can stay wired. If you want to add wireless devices, add a wireless access point. Or as is being discussed here, replace a non-wireless router with a wireless one. It still has wired ports. The 2Wire box actually replaces both modem and router, from what I'm reading, but it's still a wired router -- just with additional wireless and modem functionality.

You cannot avoid changing IP addresses, if the new device is difference from the old one. I'm really not understanding the push back on change -- it has to be done, and it's not really a painful process anyway. Go into the Mac network settings and change the numbers.

The person who says "there is NO reason to set static IPs on computers" is not real knowledgeable on networks. When there are multiple computers on a network, the only way to guarantee each computer always has the same address is to set the IP manually. Otherwise there will be IP address conflicts on the LAN. This is a problem for sharing folders or printers, for example. If no system ever shares anything, then DHCP can be done, sure. Printers generally don't connect via a network, but through a computer, so that's why the computer with the printer needs a static IP. Furthermore, the router has reservation tables, where you can be sure a wireless device doesn't steal an "open" IP that actually belongs to a computer. It's "open" because the computer set to use that IP happens to be turned off.

^ I don't really think any of this is necessary.

You can add another basic wireless router, plugging it into the current router. If the current modem/router works fine, then leave it alone -- ain't broke, don't fix it. Adding any decent wireless router will do, including a good low-cost D-Link.

This one is $33: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B000QD7B6W

I use that router as a second router. The main router is wired, this one adds wireless access.

The two routers need different IP addresses, but that's really it. Connect the new router to the old router using any of the 1-4 wired ports -- not the WAN input. You need a "crossover" Cat5/5e/6 cable, too -- not a plain Cat5/5e/6 cable. Those are cheap to find online, too.

Cat5e crossover $6.50 @ Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B00004Z5D5

It even adds a safety layer, creating a secondary network for wireless that cannot give anybody access to the main network.

For example:
192.168.1.1 - main router; all computers have IP like 192.168.1.100, 192.168.1.101, etc
192.168.3.1 - wireless router; wireless devices grab IP like 192.168.3.100, etc
255.255.255.0 subnet mask
gateway = router

Somebody connected to "3" cannot access anything on "1" because it's not in the same subnet. To be on the same subnet, the second router would need to be at 192.168.1.2 (the last number is one number higher).

Most people don't know that you can stack routers. That's actually how the entire internet works -- tons of switches and routers cascading signals across the globe.

To some extent, the exact numbers used don't really matter. It just has to have the same basic concepts. Routers and computers can all have their numbers changed, though you'll always want all numbers to fall within the private range of 192.168.x.x

The bottom line is this: You can can add wireless N access for under $40, by just buying a good D-link router and crossover cable.
And it will work fine.

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11-19-2011, 08:50 PM
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What I have right now is this; http://www.amazon.com/Siemens-Effici...cmu_pg__header

it's IP Address is; 192.168.0.1, and i think it is the routing one, as someone pointed out on the amazon reviews, mine is the 5100b with 5 lights.

i dont want to mess with or change the modem settings or ip number, could I leave it as is?

& since it only has one ethernet port, I have it connected to this; http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...00_i00_details

& into this switch I have Ethernet cord strung from it to my mac in my bedroom.

the mac in my room has;

Location; automatic
Ethernet
configure IPv4; manually
IP address; 192.168.0.60
subnet mask; 255.255.255.0
router; 192.168.0.1
DNS server; 192.168.0.1

for the router & DNS server, are these numbers for the modem? & would I change these to the router ip address? would I also then change the pc to the routers ip address?

the dell pc in the kitchen is set up with obtain IP address automatically, & obtain DNS server automatically.

I also have this; http://www.amazon.com/Netgear-WNR200...1755439&sr=1-1

how could I set up an access or wifi network with these items i just linked to that I have?

Apologies if I seem slow but I do not quite understand what numbers for what items I would change, & where in the system controls on both the mac & pc do I input these numbers?
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11-21-2011, 03:58 AM
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I think you're focusing too much on the IP addresses. For a moment, forget the IP addresses.

1. You have a working modem and router currently, correct?
2. You want to add wireless ability to your home, correct?

If both #1 and #2 are accurate statements, then all you need to do is add another router to your home.
The new one plugs into the old one.
This assumes the old router has more than one port. So ...

3. You have a wired router with four ports, correct?

If #3 is an accurate statement, then definitely just add another router.

----------

So you've bought both routers.
The old one still works fine as 192.168.0.1

The new router IP could be 192.168.1.1, 192.168.0.1, or something else entirely (192.168.#.#)
Two things can happen:
- If the IP is different, great! No issues. Connect new one to old one with crossover Cat5e cable. Network upgraded. Enjoy.
- If it has the same IP, that won't work. The new one has to be changed to coexist.

To change router IP:
Connect the router to a computer that automatically pulls an IP address.
Note: Plug router Cat5e (non-crossover cable) in when computer turned off -- plug in router power, then turn on computer.
Login to new router, change IP to something else. (192.168.1.1 is fine)
Turn off computer, unplug everything -- then go about connecting new router to old router, reconnect computer as before, etc.
Turn all computers off. Plugin all routers in (power + Cat5e), then turn on computers again. Everything should network.

Disclaimer: Experienced admins don't have to turn computers off/on, but it's easier than teaching DOS/Linux network reboots from CLI.
For anybody reading this, shouting at the screen -- yes, I'm aware.

----------

Buying replacement hardware isn't required. You can just more, to expand existing abilities. And it's cheaper.

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  #18  
11-21-2011, 04:45 PM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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When I hook up the new router to the pc, do I hook it up while the pc is powered down, but with the power strip still on?

after I connect the router, do I turn it on 1st & then start up the pc?

is there any particular sequence to setting it all up interns of powering on?
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  #19  
11-21-2011, 05:42 PM
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lordsmurf lordsmurf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sossity View Post
while the pc is powered down
Yes.

Quote:
but with the power strip still on?
Does not matter.

Quote:
after I connect the router, do I turn it on 1st
Yes.

Quote:
& then start up the pc?
Yes.

Quote:
is there any particular sequence to setting it all up, in terms of powering on?
Modem (wait for blinky light, takes about 2 minutes max)
> router (wait 30 seconds)
> computers

Otherwise, no.

Technically speaking...
For more complex setups, you'll want the LAN server on first, before workstations, but that's not something you need to worry about.

You have a small home network.

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  #20  
11-21-2011, 08:11 PM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
The Dell system being wired or wireless makes no difference on whether a Kindle/iPad/etc has wireless access. If it's wired now, it can stay wired. If you want to add wireless devices, add a wireless access point. Or as is being discussed here, replace a non-wireless router with a wireless one. It still has wired ports. The 2Wire box actually replaces both modem and router, from what I'm reading, but it's still a wired router -- just with additional wireless and modem functionality.

You cannot avoid changing IP addresses, if the new device is difference from the old one. I'm really not understanding the push back on change -- it has to be done, and it's not really a painful process anyway. Go into the Mac network settings and change the numbers.

The person who says "there is NO reason to set static IPs on computers" is not real knowledgeable on networks. When there are multiple computers on a network, the only way to guarantee each computer always has the same address is to set the IP manually. Otherwise there will be IP address conflicts on the LAN. This is a problem for sharing folders or printers, for example. If no system ever shares anything, then DHCP can be done, sure. Printers generally don't connect via a network, but through a computer, so that's why the computer with the printer needs a static IP. Furthermore, the router has reservation tables, where you can be sure a wireless device doesn't steal an "open" IP that actually belongs to a computer. It's "open" because the computer set to use that IP happens to be turned off.

^ I don't really think any of this is necessary.

You can add another basic wireless router, plugging it into the current router. If the current modem/router works fine, then leave it alone -- ain't broke, don't fix it. Adding any decent wireless router will do, including a good low-cost D-Link.

This one is $33: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B000QD7B6W

I use that router as a second router. The main router is wired, this one adds wireless access.

The two routers need different IP addresses, but that's really it. Connect the new router to the old router using any of the 1-4 wired ports -- not the WAN input. You need a "crossover" Cat5/5e/6 cable, too -- not a plain Cat5/5e/6 cable. Those are cheap to find online, too.

Cat5e crossover $6.50 @ Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B00004Z5D5

It even adds a safety layer, creating a secondary network for wireless that cannot give anybody access to the main network.

For example:
192.168.1.1 - main router; all computers have IP like 192.168.1.100, 192.168.1.101, etc
192.168.3.1 - wireless router; wireless devices grab IP like 192.168.3.100, etc
255.255.255.0 subnet mask
gateway = router

Somebody connected to "3" cannot access anything on "1" because it's not in the same subnet. To be on the same subnet, the second router would need to be at 192.168.1.2 (the last number is one number higher).

Most people don't know that you can stack routers. That's actually how the entire internet works -- tons of switches and routers cascading signals across the globe.

To some extent, the exact numbers used don't really matter. It just has to have the same basic concepts. Routers and computers can all have their numbers changed, though you'll always want all numbers to fall within the private range of 192.168.x.x

The bottom line is this: You can can add wireless N access for under $40, by just buying a good D-link router and crossover cable.
And it will work fine.
The Dell system being wired or wireless makes no difference on whether a Kindle/iPad/etc has wireless access. If it's wired now, it can stay wired. If you want to add wireless devices, add a wireless access point. Or as is being discussed here, replace a non-wireless router with a wireless one. It still has wired ports. The 2Wire box actually replaces both modem and router, from what I'm reading, but it's still a wired router -- just with additional wireless and modem functionality.

So I dont need to get a wifi card for the dell pc?
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