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  #1  
11-10-2010, 09:20 PM
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Here's another document that I received forever ago, and at one point was put onto our now-gone video tips/news blog (from 2005-2006). I'm archiving it here again, for historical purposes.

NOTE: Be sure to read my comments below the quoted release...

Quote:
Fujifilm Introduces DVD 1X-16X Media with New, Proprietary Dye

August 25, 2004 -- Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc. today announced that the Fujifilm DVD+R 1X-16X optical media would be available in the U.S. market in September. The media is among the industry's first optical technologies to offer a disc capable of recording consistently and reliably in drives ranging from 1X-16X recording speeds. At a speed of 16X, a full 4.7 GB DVD+R disc can be written in about 6 minutes.

This new disc continues a legacy of innovation by incorporating Fujifilm's unique, patented organic dye coating that was announced in January. The heavy-metal free dye comes from the company's extensive research and development labs, which have over the last 70 years created an extensive library of innovative compounds based on photochemical research that have been responsible for advancing many technologies.

"As DVD recording technology has evolved, Fujifilm engineers have worked side-by-side with hardware vendors and retailers to help bring innovation to the marketplace," said Rich Gadomski, Vice President, Marketing, Recording Media Division, Fuji Photo Film U.S.A. "This new product will help decrease the number of SKU's retailers need to stock, simplify consumer choice and help retailers eliminate confusion."

The new media is optimized for customer recording valuable digital data, whether recording in real time at 1X speed or with a new 16x DVD drive. Fujifilm-branded DVD media incorporate the company's new "Oxonol" dye coating, the first such coating to be used by Fujifilm engineers in Japan in conjunction with leading hardware vendors to provide recording capability for such a wide range of drive speeds, and is compatible with existing drive technology already in the market.

About Oxonol Dye

The new Fujifilm technology is based on an organic dye that has proven to allow recording capabilities at speeds ranging from 1X to 16X. This will provide retail partners the ability to simplify shelf space by offering a recordable DVD that works with both new and legacy drives.

The new higher-speed DVDs are ideal for archiving, storage and retrieval of high-capacity data files such as photos and video. They can also be used for stand-alone PC or network backup at home or for business. Fujifilm has produced a simulated archival life estimate for the media of over 100 years (using the industry-recognized Arrhenius storage performance acceleration method.)

This environmentally friendly, heavy-metal-free organic dye was optimized for mass production by existing spin-coating manufacturing technologies.
Fujifilm is currently developing a dye that will provide an efficient, reliable media for the high-capacity and high transfer rate needs of emerging Blue-Violet LASER write-once technology.

The Fujifilm DVD+R 1X-16X media will be available in multiple disc packs and specialized use formats in Q4 2004 through key distributors, resellers and retail stores.
Fujifilm (aka Fuji) did not, and still does not, manufacturer their own discs. Instead, companies like Prodisc, MBI and Ritek were the ones tasked with creating media to their specs, using their dye materials.

RITEKF1 DVD-R and RITEKF16 DVD+R -- where the "F" stands for Fuji, whereas all Fuji discs use their own Oxonol dye -- have actually proven to be somewhat decent media. These discs are much better than Ritek's own in-house discs, or even their Philips AZO discs (RITEKP codes). I've used quite a few TDK-branded RITEKF1 16x DVD-R in the past 18 months, and had overall stellar results. Those discs were not one-by-one tested, but were used for temporary transport masters, as well as duplication for customers -- never had a single complaint about bad discs, random tests were within specs, and I was personally impressed by my problem-free performance. (Note that I would still not use these for anything "archival" or "master" in nature -- just secondary replaceable media.)

Worth saving.

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  #2  
11-11-2010, 01:30 AM
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Here's another quotable reference:

Quote:
Organic DVD Media

Many environmentally friendly DVD recording technologies are being researched, including corn-starch polymer optical discs from Pioneer and Sanyo, and paper-based DVD media from Sony. However, with the Fujifilm DVD+R 1X-16X optical media, Fuji Photo Film U.S.A. is among the first companies to reach the mass market with environmentally friendly DVD recording media.

Fuji's DVD+R media has a coat of Oxonol dye, a heavy-metal-free compound on which information is recorded.

"Oxonol is an organic dye, not a metal dye, giving it a lot of environmental benefit," says Craig Andrews, senior manager of Fuji Photo Film U.S.A.'s corporate communications group. Traditional media uses a coat of heavy-metal dye, making them environmentally unfriendly to some degree, according to Andrews.

Oxonol, a proprietary dye manufactured by Fuji engineers in Japan, has benefits other than just being environmentally friendly, Andrews says. Oxonol molecules are hydrophobic, aiding in the media's longevity by deflecting humidity. The dye can also resist ultraviolet rays, saving the disc from possible damage caused by light sources. The Oxonol-based media is compatible with existing DVD recording drives ranging from speeds of 1X to 16X, allowing it to work with old and new DVD+R drives. The media is not yet compatible with the new HD-DVD (high definition/high density DVD) or Blu-ray Disc recording formats.

Philips Electronics is already using Fuji's technology in its Philips Recordable Media brand, the 1X-16X DVD+R medium, which costs $1.80 per disc. Fuji's own brand is available from U.S. retailers for $20 for a ten-pack.
from "Digital Gear: Going Mobile" by Agam Shah, PCWorld Jan 11, 2005 2:00 am
URL: pcworld.com/article/118996/digital_gear_going_mobile.html


When used in well-made discs, it's probably a fine dye. The problem is getting a manufacturer like Ritek to make a consistent disc.

What I'll be seeking is information on why, exactly, a metal-free dye is supposed to be better for the environment. I wonder if that's matter-of-fact science, or simply a distortion of facts to make it sound more environmentally conscious. It's sometimes hard to tell.

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  #3  
11-11-2010, 01:38 AM
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Note that usage in DVD+R DL is also possible, although I don't believe it's currently being used for any DVD+R DL manufacturing, as of Q3 2010 information I have available. However, if anybody would be making it (now or in the future), I'd bet on Ritek DVD+R DL being the ones to used oxonol dyes, seeing how they're the primary manufacturer of Fujifilm oxonol based DVD-R and DVD+R right now.

Quote:
Feasibility of High-Speed Recording on Oxonol Dye Double-Layer Recordable Digital Versatile Discs Produced by Inverted Stack Method

Tomokazu Umezawa, Hirokazu Hashimoto, Michihiro Shibata, Hiroshi Kubo, Masuji Motoki1 and Hisashi Mikoshiba1 | Research and Development Laboratories, Recording Media Product Division, Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., 2-12-1 Ohgi-cho, Odawara, Kanagawa 250-0001, Japan | 1Synthetic Organic Chemistry Laboratories, Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., 210 Nakanuma, Minamiashigara, Kanagawa 250-0193, Japan | (Received August 15, 2005; accepted November 25, 2005; published online February 24, 2006)

The feasibility of high-speed recording on oxonol dye double-layer recordable digital versatile discs (DVD+R DL and DVD-R DL) produced using the inverted stack method was investigated. Jitter of less than 9% was achieved at 2.4–16 recording speeds on DVD+R DL discs, and a high aperture ratio (AR) and jitter of less than 8% were achieved at 2–12 recording speeds on DVD-R DL discs. From these results it was concluded that oxonol dye is suitable for high-speed recording on DVD+R DL and DVD-R DL discs. Recording principles of the L1 layer were also investigated.

KEYWORDS: DVD+R, DVD-R, oxonol dye, double-layer, inverted stack method, high-speed recording, aperture ratio, land prepit
URL: jjap.jsap.jp/link?JJAP/45/1442/
DOI: 10.1143/JJAP.45.1442

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  #4  
11-11-2010, 02:44 PM
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Some more interesting information on the chemistry of Fujifilm's oxonol-based dye...
From the Royal Society of Chemistry:

Quote:
17 January 2006 -- A new class of dyes for use as the recording layer in DVDs has been developed by a group of scientists from the Fuji Photo Film Company in Japan. The team, led by Yoshio Inagaki, worked to improve the light stability of dyes based on oxonol. Dyes used for DVDs need to be resistant both to ambient light and to the laser beam used to read the disk.

The dyes they developed consist of an oxonol anion and an electron-accepting bipyridinium cation. When the film absorbs a photon, it is passed quickly from the oxonol ion to the bipyridinium ion and back again, allowing the molecules to quickly return to their ground state. Shortening the time the molecules spend in the excited state minimises damage done to the film by the laser.

'We have actually introduced new dyes based on the present design principle into a DVD-R that has recently been put on the market,' said Inagaki. The oxonol dyes absorb light very strongly and so can be used in applications which require very thin films. Unusually among this type of dye, they do not contain heavy metal ions, meaning they are safer to make and dispose of than many conventional dyes. It should also be possible to tune the colour of the dyes. Inagaki is optimistic: 'the present design principle applies to any oxonol dye, and properties of the oxonol dyes can be easily and widely changed by modifiying their molecular structure,' he said.

b516043j-275_tcm18-45624.jpg

New dyes for DVDs | URL: rsc.org/Publishing/ChemTech/Volume/2006/2/dvd_dyes.asp



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