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  #1  
09-13-2013, 08:06 AM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 DVD + R creates and catch fungus?

2 my DVD + R before handling Always wash hands with water but unintentionally I touched down on the surface of the disc, I'm worried about fungal growth on the DVDs?

-- merged --

Can someone help me with these questions please?
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  #2  
09-27-2013, 12:19 AM
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I've been using DVD-R (and later DVD+R) for almost 15 years now. I've never seen fungus in or on discs. Never. And I've handled at least half a million discs. (I never counted. It's probably more!) That just does not happen. Never seen it, never even heard of it.

Some CDs, yes -- but that's another story. It's VERY rare, and can only infest CD, not DVD, because of how the discs are made. It also has a lot to do with location, and the quality of the CD media.

Again, DVD, no. Never. Not a worry you should have. Just use good discs, store them properly, the end.

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  #3  
09-27-2013, 07:17 AM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 My friend has a disc with dark spots and other transparent disc with holes, holes as if corroding media inside and increase in size, what is it?

2 Because fungi can only infect CD and not DVD + R? what DVD + R has to protect it from fungus attack? I know of no material DVD that is immune to fungus

3 my media is Philips DVD + R 16X ID: CMC MAG M01
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  #4  
09-28-2013, 04:26 PM
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1. Define "discs". Verify it's a DVD.
- DVD+RW often form craters in the dye.
- Cheap DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW and DVD+RW can have bonding issues, which can affect the outer perimeter of a disc.
- CD can have pinhole issue in the foil.

2. The disc is sealed. Vacuum sealed. If that breaks open, the disc is dead anyway. Fungus cannot "get into" (infect) discs. It has to ALREADY be in the media from some poor manufacturing. That's NEVER happened to my knowledge. There are certain factors of materials, manufacturing errors, disc construction, and environment that caused the CD (and Laserdisc) errors. It's not possible with DVD.

3. You have budget consumer media. It's not great, but it's also not going to come down with a case of fungi.

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  #5  
09-28-2013, 05:40 PM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 You did not answer some of my questions: What protection is a DVD + R to have no risk of fungus that does not have a CD?

2 The disc was sealed but the fungus can grow and eat through the polycarbonate or polycarbonate and come inside the disc has a fungus Geotrichum eating polycarbonate and I'm worried if my discs and my drive is contaminated with fungi, find no concrete answer on fungi in medias

3 My friend has a disc with dark spots and other transparent disc with holes, holes if the corroding medium inside and Increase in size, what is it?
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  #6  
09-28-2013, 06:22 PM
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Your question doesn't make any sense.
- Does it have "protection"? No.
- Does it need protection? Also no.

DVDs also don't have protection from tigers, but it's not likely that a big cat is going to eat the disc. (Reference to an episode The Simpsons.)

The disc is sealed. The end.

I don't know of any fungus so acidic that it eats plastic.

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  #7  
09-28-2013, 06:47 PM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 The materials of a DVD + R are propitious to the development of fungus?

2 The disc is sealed but the fungus can attack out of the disk and then penetrate it

3 What was all degradation problems in medias DVD you've ever seen? you've seen fungus on DVD? I've seen DVD discs with dark spots on the bottom and transparent holes
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  #8  
09-28-2013, 06:50 PM
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As stated, DVD+RW often develop craters in the dye, and DVD-R/DVD+R have rainbowing due to bonding (glue) issues.
Without seeing the disc, and not having a disc expert look at it, speculation is pointless.

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  #9  
09-28-2013, 07:47 PM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 The materials of a DVD + R are propitious to the development of fungus?

2 The disc is sealed but the fungus can attack out of the disk and then penetrate it

3 What was all degradation problems in medias DVD you've ever seen? you've seen fungus on DVD? I've seen DVD discs with dark spots on the bottom and transparent holes


my disc is DVD+R
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  #10  
09-28-2013, 08:15 PM
volksjager volksjager is offline
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  #11  
09-28-2013, 08:19 PM
volksjager volksjager is offline
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fungus can not eat plastic
and unless the disk is physically damaged fungus cant get inside of it.

disks can be damage from being left in the sun, using improper chemicals to clean them, spilling chemicals on them etc
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  #12  
09-28-2013, 08:42 PM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 I'm told it has a fungus with the name Geotrichum eating Polycarbonate

2 If fungus does not attack medias DVD so what are the problems of degradation of the media?
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  #13  
09-29-2013, 04:59 AM
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Fungus could be hard issue, if it generaly does progress. I believe you will see black spots, when happens.

I suggest to keep clean hands when handling it.
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  #14  
09-29-2013, 05:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
1 I'm told it has a fungus with the name Geotrichum eating Polycarbonate

2 If fungus does not attack medias DVD so what are the problems of degradation of the media?
2. in most cases dye deterioration
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  #15  
09-29-2013, 07:28 AM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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1 I always wash my hands before handling the medias, I possess few DVDs with dark spots but do not know if it is fungus but these discs are still functioning

2 My friend has discs with transparent dots that increase over time and do not know what is

Here are some pictures of discs: http://i797.photobucket.com/albums/y...ampleBelow.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...4/Disc_rot.jpg

http://www.lifetimememoriesandstorie.../disc_rot2.jpg
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  #16  
09-29-2013, 09:14 AM
pepst pepst is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
2 My friend has discs with transparent dots that increase over time and do not know what is

Here are some pictures of discs: http://i797.photobucket.com/albums/y...ampleBelow.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...4/Disc_rot.jpg

http://www.lifetimememoriesandstorie.../disc_rot2.jpg
I have some bad news for your friend. Those pictures looks like a good example of a dangerous DVD fungus.
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  #17  
09-29-2013, 10:25 AM
gamemaniaco gamemaniaco is offline
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If these pictures are of fungi on DVDs then this DVD was put on a drive the drive was contaminated and contaminated all DVD discs that were placed on that drive?

I'm worried about it
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  #18  
09-29-2013, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
If these pictures are of fungi on DVDs then this DVD was put on a drive the drive was contaminated and contaminated all DVD discs that were placed on that drive?

I'm worried about it
If you put a DVD+R with fungus in your drive, the fungus will slowly eat your DVD drive and then your motherboard.
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  #19  
09-29-2013, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
fungus with the name Geotrichum eating Polycarbonate
That's a commonly found fungus in the tropics. However that's a very, very, very rare fungus, in terms of affecting CDs. It lives on polycarbonate AND eats a specific dye AND it invades the disc via pinhole degradation in the foil AND thrive in a specific outdoors environment. In other words, it can't effect DVD, because it's not made that way. Even if such a fungus found it's way on polycarbonate pre-manufacture, the dye is wrong, and the sealing would prevent both oxygen. If even it was unsealed, the disc would doe anyway. Plus you'd have to be using your computer in the jungle, outside, and not indoors in typical home/office environment (RH less than 50%).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudc.me View Post
Fungus could be hard issue, if it generaly does progress. I believe you will see black spots, when happens. I suggest to keep clean hands when handling it.
None of the makes sense.
1. Fungus always progresses.
2. It's not black spots. In fact, I can't think of anything that would cause black spots on DVD+R. Maybe DVD+RW and BD-R (craters).
3. Handling isn't the issue -- storage is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pepst View Post
2. in most cases dye deterioration
That and bonding. In my experience, the disc falls apart because of cheap glues faster than dye. Cheap glues can last 5-15 years, while the dye often lasts at least 10-30. Thankfully, bonding isn't a common issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
1 I always wash my hands before handling the medias, I possess few DVDs with dark spots but do not know if it is fungus but these discs are still functioning

2 My friend has discs with transparent dots that increase over time and do not know what is
Here are some pictures of discs: http://i797.photobucket.com/albums/y...ampleBelow.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...4/Disc_rot.jpg
http://www.lifetimememoriesandstorie.../disc_rot2.jpg
Are your sure you "friend" isn't Google?

Because none of the photos are fungus. See my next post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pepst View Post
I have some bad news for your friend. Those pictures looks like a good example of a dangerous DVD fungus.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gamemaniaco View Post
If these pictures are of fungi on DVDs then this DVD was put on a drive the drive was contaminated and contaminated all DVD discs that were placed on that drive? I'm worried about it
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepst View Post
If you put a DVD+R with fungus in your drive, the fungus will slowly eat your DVD drive and then your motherboard.
Hahahahaa.... he's going to believe you! (I know you're just messing with him. )

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  #20  
09-29-2013, 01:05 PM
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This topic annoys me, because people say things without knowing what's going on. First off, there is no "DVD rot". That's a stupid myth, based on something that happened to pressed Laserdiscs in the 90s, thanks to cheap (inferior!) aluminum. It has no translation to CD or DVD. Nothing "rots". This isn't fruit in your refrigerator or on your cabinet.

The images show 3 things, NONE of them are fungus.

1. That's a pressed CD, with a pinhole in the foil. This is often manufacturing defect (CHEAPSKATES!) when the area was too thin. Over time, it developed a hole. The disc may skip on that area.

2. This is a DVD-R, and that's a defect in the dye. It's always been there, from before it was burned. It's a bad disc, toss it.

3. Again, pressed CD, and the top lacquer and foil have been damaged -- likely from improper storage.

Stop looking at random photos of bad discs on Google.

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