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  #1  
02-18-2020, 02:16 AM
Vakicious Vakicious is offline
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Iíve been doing some research on what to get to protect my gear (computer, cassette deck, VCR, TBC) from voltage spikes, but Iím a bit confused. I get that a UPS is a good idea for my computer, but what is best for the other gear? I heard some talk of a voltage regulator being the best idea for the audio/video gear, but is that needed in addition to a UPS?
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  #2  
02-18-2020, 10:06 AM
keaton keaton is offline
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Gear can be very expensive and is not easily replaced. Spending a bit more to protect it from the unexpected is a very wise move.

Not an expert, haven't done a lot of research. But I did spend about $100 on a CyberPower which includes AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulation). So I guess I already have a voltage regulator included? My understanding of how this UPS works is it gives you stable 120 V 60 Hz AC independent of the power to the UPS, and does what some might think a surge protector would do, but doesn't. The battery is there when the voltage is dipping too low or gone altogether, and gives you time for a proper shut down. It helps to know how much power you are drawing, so you know how much of a power rating you need from your UPS. So look at the volt/amp/watt ratings on your gear to see what you need. I went more minimal, and just protect the things that are not big power consumers and/or are old equipment that's not easily replaced. A big stereo amp could be a huge power consumer, so I didn't include that. I'd hate to lose it, but it's not so irreplaceable or rare as these SVHS VCRs or Time Base Correctors.
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  #3  
02-18-2020, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vakicious View Post
Iíve been doing some research on what to get to protect my gear (computer, cassette deck, VCR, TBC) from voltage spikes,
Not just spikes. Overage, underage, and complete loss. It's battery backup protection, and output is regulated.

Quote:
but Iím a bit confused. I get that a UPS is a good idea for my computer,
Not just computer. All electronics.

Quote:
but what is best for the other gear?
UPS is best as it gets. Price differences control battery life. The $50 units have maybe 2-3 minutes, not enough time for anything. A $100-200 unit is what you want. Remember max advertised life is NOT the actual life. You must calculate wattage load per device, then you'll get actual battery time.

Quote:
I heard some talk of a voltage regulator being the best idea for the audio/video gear,
No.

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Originally Posted by keaton View Post
Gear can be very expensive and is not easily replaced. Spending a bit more to protect it from the unexpected is a very wise move.
UPS = insurance.

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  #4  
02-19-2020, 08:34 PM
NJRoadfan NJRoadfan is offline
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If price is no object, the cleanest UPS is a so called "double conversion" UPS that does AC-to-DC-to-AC conversion in the unit. It regenerates a clean 120V 60Hz AC true sine wave power no matter what the power source is (wall or battery), even during switches from line to battery.
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  #5  
02-26-2020, 01:34 PM
mohammad84 mohammad84 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post

UPS = insurance.
Is there any specific model that you would recommend?
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  #6  
02-26-2020, 01:46 PM
Sergei316 Sergei316 is offline
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I use several of the Cyberpower CP1500AVRLCD. It has the AVR and the battery backup. Great units.
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  #7  
02-26-2020, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammad84 View Post
Is there any specific model that you would recommend?
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Originally Posted by Sergei316 View Post
I use several of the Cyberpower CP1500AVRLCD. It has the AVR and the battery backup. Great units.
The Cyberpower CP1500AVRLCD is my choice as well, about $150.

See. https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP...language=en_US

That Amazon page also lists some slightly cheaper ones, down to about $110, if you want to shave some dollars, and think you can get away with a 500W instead of the 900W that we use. I do use a 850VA LCD on a smaller setup as well. It all depends on how much wattage x battery life is needed (aka, how many items, and the watt rating of each, will be plugged in at once).

Also realize you can plug power strips into a UPS, you're not limited to the 2-3 battery plugs.

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  #8  
02-26-2020, 08:08 PM
Mike12086 Mike12086 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJRoadfan View Post
If price is no object, the cleanest UPS is a so called "double conversion" UPS that does AC-to-DC-to-AC conversion in the unit. It regenerates a clean 120V 60Hz AC true sine wave power no matter what the power source is (wall or battery), even during switches from line to battery.
I work on UPS systems and agree with the above and that is what I personally run. Looking around on Amazon the cheapest model for this seems to be:
https://www.amazon.com/Tripp-Lite-Do...15&sr=8-4&th=1

I have never used a Tripp Lite UPS but have heard good things. If you are a tinker type of person I would check ebay for either an Eaton/Powerware 9130 or 9125. Both of these units you can usually find in the $100-$200 range and when new sold for north of $1000. Most would need batteries but take standard 7 Ah batteries that can be found anywhere.
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  #9  
02-26-2020, 08:23 PM
NJRoadfan NJRoadfan is offline
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Originally Posted by Mike12086 View Post
I have never used a Tripp Lite UPS but have heard good things. If you are a tinker type of person I would check ebay for either an Eaton/Powerware 9130 or 9125. Both of these units you can usually find in the $100-$200 range and when new sold for north of $1000. Most would need batteries but take standard 7 Ah batteries that can be found anywhere.
Tripp Lite has good customer service, no complaints there. Dealing with JCP&L, I can see why someone would see the benefit of an overkill UPS.
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  #10  
02-27-2020, 08:25 AM
Vakicious Vakicious is offline
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I currently have a CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD
https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP...language=en_US

I’ve done a deep-Dive into research on simulated sine wave vs true sine wave. Simulated is fine for most electronics, but A/V gear can sometimes be sensitive to that and true sine wave is the way to go.
https://blog.tripplite.com/pure-sine...ave-explained/

I’m thinking of picking up the 1500VA model for $200 as well. I’d put all my A/V gear (WinXP machine, VCRs, TBC, cassette deck) on the 1000VA, and my main computer on the 1500VA.
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  #11  
02-27-2020, 07:30 PM
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lordsmurf lordsmurf is offline
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Pure sinewave is mostly for power supplies that require it, specifically most modern desktops. For A/V gear, or legacy systems, it really makes no difference.

I'd not get anywhere near a Tripplite product, nor an APC. Something about APC can react badly to modern power grids, and on our last move some years ago, they all blew within months. All were replaced by Cyberpower, and no issues since. APC is definitely lower quality than Cyberpower, and too often have component failures, even before the batteries needed replacing. Tripplite was always the "value brand" of surge protectors, and is a latecomer to UPS.

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  #12  
02-29-2020, 02:56 PM
Samir Samir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJRoadfan View Post
If price is no object, the cleanest UPS is a so called "double conversion" UPS that does AC-to-DC-to-AC conversion in the unit. It regenerates a clean 120V 60Hz AC true sine wave power no matter what the power source is (wall or battery), even during switches from line to battery.
This is the only way I would go with any equipment I wouldn't want damaged. This will give you the absolute cleanest power that will help keep older gear that may not be in optimal condition running as long as it can. I've used this rule since the late 1990s when we bought our first units, which are still operating in good condition today.

As far as brands, I've used cyber power and apc, but have recommended tripplite, leibert, and eaton to others who were happy with them. Generally, I get only high end units, but have a few cheap ones too. I generally buy mine open box at substantial discounts ($1000 units for $200).

APC is the only brand I have any long-term experience with and their newer units seem cheaper than their older ones in the lower range. But their rack units are still top of the line, as are those from other brands like cyberpower.
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