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  #1  
10-23-2010, 04:43 PM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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On this forum, this model was suggested to me, it looks nice, but is a little bit expensive for me, & it is considered a mid level DSLR, would it work & last with me as I learn with it? can it be used as a pro?

Either way, this will be a big ticket item for me & I will need it to last me a few years. As explained before, I would use it for general photography, low light, some action, nature & shooting artwork.

It seems to be in very short supply right now, I know no one here has a crystal ball, but will there be more availability of it? it seems to have sold out fast, will there be any more? I ask because I read a description of rare to it somewhere online. I would think for the holiday season Nikon will get more stock to the stores & online.

Is it just a one time run/make/edition of these cameras for collectors? or is it just turned out to be very popular & sold out right away? if it is rare & I get it, how can I be sure there will be lenses & replacement parts for it in the future when & if it is no longer manufactured? I have read about the wait rule for when new versions or when new electronics come out, to wait for bugs to be worked out, one reviewer on amazon said there was a green dot on their video shot with the camera.

I am curious because I found there were only 3 left on amazon as of this posting. On amazon now, why is the body only more expensive than the kit? I would probably want a bigger lens like 200mm or longer for distance, what lens should I get with it if I get a bigger lens, than the one that comes with the kit. Would the kit lens work for shooting my art?

Should I jump on it now or wait until there are more reviews of it, & more in stock. I looked at a couple of photo sites & could not see any sample photos taken with it.

Last edited by Sossity; 10-23-2010 at 04:55 PM.
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  #2  
10-24-2010, 12:27 PM
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Nikon has a chronic issue of not having enough supply to meet the demand of its new gear. It seems to be a mix of marketing (creates demand), a way to keep prices inflated (more demand than supply), and possibly a simple matter of underestimating demand. Another possible option is Nikon simply wants to get gear "out there" for users to have as early as possible, which is just as good as paid marketing, rather than waiting until warehouses are full. It probably keeps warehouse costs down, too!

It took me quite a few months to snag my D3s. It was in short supply, and still is to a degree.
I had that issue with my D200, D1, F5 and N6006. So that's been an issue for at least 15 years now!

It's not likely to be "rare" by any use of the word, no.

Nikon probably still has parts available for the original D1 from 1999, if I needed repair on it. They've always been pretty good about having the parts and skill to repair older lenses and bodies.

Just keep looking for it on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.ht...reative=390957
That is, if it's the body you've decided that you'd like to have.

The beauty of this particular body is that it's probably using Nikon's own in-house sensor (which is likely based off excellent Sony sensors). I'd go so far as to call it a D3 sensor on a D90 body. What you get from this is excellent high ISO performance, with ISO 100-6400 in 1, 1/2 or 1/3 EV steps (up to 25600 with HI+ boost ranges). Shooting at 6400 with good sensor clarity exceed 35mm film quality in that low-light range.

It also appears to have a really peppy autofocus motor, which would help with non-G lenses. Unlike other consumer bodies, you can access about 50 years worth high quality manual focus AI, AF and AF-D lenses. Plus non-G third-party lenses. That's huge, if you want to add a number of good lenses, and don't want to be forced into the "G bubble".

The 6fps is nice, too, if you want to shoot any sports, kids or animals. I routinely shoot the D3s at 6fps, because anything higher just tends to flood the buffer and CF card with unneeded images. I've never seen much need for 7-11fps, as more isn't better, more is just more crap to sift through in Bridge, and it makes the CPU and RAM fill up and the computer go slow. All for nothing.

If I didn't really, really really want full-frame, I'd probably have opted for this D7000 body myself. But I also have about $2K in lenses that work best on FX bodies, hence my decision for $5.2K D3s.

I think this may be the first camera that I'd consider an actual upgrade from my own coveted D200 body, which I still use quite a bit for outdoor daytime photography, and keep in a bag as backup to the D3s at all times.

If you have any existing skills at photography, and don't wish to be artificially limited by a camera, I'd try to get this instead of saving a few hundred dollars for something you'd want to replace in a few years. This body would last you at least 3-5 years, minimum, before you'd even be tempted to upgrade.

Don't worry about "sample photos" -- that's easily biased by an excellent (or crappy) photographer. The technical specs of this body call for it to take great images.

Ultimately, it comes back to money, but I think this is worth the slightly higher expense. You can always grab a used lens to save some dollars. I can give you a number of leads on cheap-but-good used lenses. (Heck, for that matter, a cheap gray-market lens would be fine for now!) I'd put as much money into the good body as you could afford.

What is your actual budget?
Maximum allowed, as well as your "hopeful" budget (i.e., the least you'd like to think you could get by with)

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Last edited by kpmedia; 10-24-2010 at 12:33 PM.
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  #3  
10-24-2010, 07:56 PM
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my budget; max would probably be 1,800 & hopeful, 1,500
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10-25-2010, 09:23 AM
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I think you can do $1,500, not problem.

There is a D7000 kit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B0042X9LCO
The "Nikon D7000 16.2MP DX-Format CMOS Digital SLR with 3.0 Inch LCD and 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 AF-S DX VR ED Nikkor Lens"
That's a good "everyman" type of lens -- something I'd use when I didn't know what I'd need, and I was limited to only a small bag (or even just a camera hanging from the arm without extra gear in a bag). This is equivalent to ~28-170 if it were on full-frame, which makes it a decent wide to a somewhat far away zoom (about double of normal human vision, or maybe a tad longer).

Or are you looking for a potentially better lens setup?
Tokina 12-24 is a beauty for wide angle DX lens:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...3167/KBID/4166
That'd be $400. It measure in at ~17-35 in a "full frame" context. Excellent wide range. (Amazon wants $500 for this, so B&H is actually $100 lower, which is unusual. So know that I'm looking at several places for you, to keep budget-minded!)

So we'd run into your max budget of $1,800 to get another pair of decent lenses: 50mm 1.8 + ~200mm kit-grade zoom

50mm 1.8, $120 - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B00005LEN4
On a DX crop-frame body (like D7000), this makes for a ~75mm portrait length lens. I use a 50 quite a bit. In the "old days" of photography, before digital -- even before auto focus! -- most cameras came with a straight 50mm fixed lens, and that's what I learned on. Great basketball lens.

Nikkor 55-200 for $175, nothing special: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B0009HN57Y
That will give you a decent range, and it's Nikkor ED glass.

Or instead of that Nikkor 55-200, there's a Sigma in the 70-300 range, which should be just as good.
I'd consider it, given that it's only $160: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B0012X43P2
Unlike a lot of longer Sigma/Tamron lenses, this one is NOT in the undesired f/6.3 range, but sticks to f/5.6 max. That's good, and is the only reason I'd consider this. Well, that and the fact that it has Sigma's version of Nikon AF-S silent/fast autofocus. The AF motor is built into the lens, it's not the older "screwdriver" type focusing (not that the old AF is bad, just maybe not as quick or quiet).

While an 18-105 in one lens sounds nice, personally I find the "super zooms" to lack in quality compared to several shorter lenses, especially when compared to a prime (non-zoom lens) like the 50mm fixed length. I'd rather carry a bag of goodies, instead of mounting a lens that has a lot of weak areas. I had the expensive $600 Nikkor 18-200, the longer version of the 18-105, and was wholly unimpressed. It was resold (luckily for $600, so no $$$ loss to me!)

My typical D200 setup is this:
- 12-24mm f/4 Tokina
- 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor (Nikon)
- 80-200 f/.28 Nikkor (Nikon)
- TC-20E 2x to convert 80-200 to 160-400.

You could mostly mimic that setup, with the affordable 12-24 and 50. And then while you can't afford afford the 80-200 at f/2.8, you could do something in the 55,70-200,300 type range at f/3.5,4,5.6. Once upon a time, that was a sacrifice. With that D7000, you can just pump the ISO another notch or two, with no degradation of image quality (due to its great sensor) and be fine. You won't get the bokeh or depth of f/2.8, of course, but you'll still have a workable lens, even in lower light (outdoor or indoor) situations.

So let's add that up:

OPTION A:
$1,500 kit

OPTION B:
$1,200 body
$400 Tokina 12-24
$120 Nikon 50
$160 Sigma 70-300
Oops... a bit over. That comes out to $1,880.
Hmmm.... if you want, I can reanalyze and think of another combo. Unfortunately, the Tokina would be the one to go. Or we could look at a used Tokina 12-24 (not likely, but not impossible) or maybe a gray-market version to shave off some $$$ and get it down another ~$100 for you.

You may notice that I don't much prescribe to the idea of having a "normal zoom" in the 28-80mm type of range (~18-55 for DX lengths). Or what I call the "boring range" that every newbie and soccer mom likes to use. That's the range that a point-and-shoot camera and cell phone has. I want more from my images. I can always zoom to 24 on the 12-24 and take a few steps closer. Or mount the 70-300 (or 80-200, in my case) and take a few steps back. The way I had to "zoom" in the old days, when all I had was a 50mm, was by using my feet. And I not only wasn't hurting for photos, I was winning national awards for my work. I want wide and far, and I want portrait length -- that's my winning combo for photography. I own two normal zooms that mostly sit in the camera bag, unmounted except under certain conditions (one for IR, one for semi-macro). Most pros I know are the same, with wide, long and primes -- nothing really gets used in the "normal" range. You can always crop, too! That's another way to "zoom" into an image, if needed. (Just don't use it as a crutch.)

You'll need to decide what sort of zoom range you'd like, be it non-"normal" like mine, or something that more closely mimics that function of consumer cameras.

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  #5  
10-25-2010, 06:10 PM
Sossity Sossity is offline
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I clicked on amazon's links, & I did not see a body at 1,200, but as of the exact time of my writing of this reply, I saw a couple at $802, used, & used like new. Would it be safe to get one of those?

I like the look of the 50mm for my artwork, in response to my other post, you said that would work well for it. I like the sigma 300mm. I am not sure about the tokina, that is a bit pricey.

some other things I am thinking about;

what type of sd memory card would be best to get for the d7000? I looked on Nikon's website & could not find much about that. I would like a card that can take fast photos, & the HD video as well. What capacity would be best? I read some prefer to get 2; 8 gb cards instead of one 16 gb, they said it was more economical.

Administrator replies keep mentioning full frame, what is this? does the d7000 have it? & if it does not, is it a critical quality that I will need?

the weight of the d7000 with say, the 300mm sigma or any zoom lens on it, my hands are a bit small, (not bigger man's hands) would I get bad camera shake using this hand held with a zoom? will I be able to get decent hand held shots? as having a tripod for everything may not be practical. Will I need a tripod all the time?

I will probably want to get a good but not overpriced tough bag to carry all this in.

I am getting a small allotment of money this semester, & may need some money to get a student version or economical version of photoshop, illustrator or the design suite if I take photoshop & illustrator as part of my degree at my community college, for the spring 2011 semester. This alone would probably cost me about $500.00. And I am not sure, I may need a graphics tablet & those run from $70-350.00

So what ever camera set up I get, I will need to have some money left over.

I am a bit tied as what to do, I like the nikon d7000, but may also need money for next semester. should I wait on the camera? will there be more in the months ahead? or do I jump on one now?

I will probably try to contact the instructor of those classes & try to find out exactly what I will need.

I have about $2,500 in my school account right now.

Last edited by Sossity; 10-25-2010 at 06:16 PM.
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  #6  
10-27-2010, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
I clicked on amazon's links, & I did not see a body at 1,200, but as of the exact time of my writing of this reply, I saw a couple at $802, used, & used like new. Would it be safe to get one of those?
No. Absolutely not.
On a new body like this, claims of a used body for about 2/3rds cost is too good to be true -- i.e., some sort of scam. I just now looked at the above Amazon link for the D7000 (both body-only and the full kit), and see no such available body. This means it was probably a scam and removed by Amazon, or some other sucker has already made a mistake. Most likely that was for a "gray market" camera, and was stripped of everything that should come with a new D7000 (battery, books, wires, etc). What the scammer company does is call you and try to upsell you some piece-of-crap "kit" with cheap garbage. In the end, you'd pay more for junk and an unwarrantied body to some Yankee shiester (always in NY/NJ area), as compared to buying the authentic USA setup from a reputable store.

NEVER buy a camera from price alone. Always consider who it's being bought from. Amazon is safe. B&H is safe. Adorama is safe. And when I saw "Amazon" I mean from Amazon itself, not one of those third parties using Amazon.


.... I'll answer some of your other questions here in the next day or so. I wanted to be very sure you didn't fall victim to fraud or scam, so needed to get the above reply out immediately!

Thanks.


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  #7  
10-28-2010, 11:47 PM
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@Sossity
Full frame vs crop frame (FX vs DX) is explained more at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/show...2984#post12984
Plus I think you've already read some more since making this post.

Quote:
the weight of the d7000 with say, the 300mm sigma or any zoom lens on it, my hands are a bit small, (not bigger man's hands) would I get bad camera shake using this hand held with a zoom? will I be able to get decent hand held shots? as having a tripod for everything may not be practical. Will I need a tripod all the time?
At slower shutter speeds (under ~1/200th at that length, 300mm) I would think a monopod would be a good idea, at very least, if not a full tripod.

Monopods can be quite inexpensive for non-pro models. I need to buy one myself in the near future. All my monopods and tripods are shot. But I don't have the budget for pro series 'pods right now, so I'll slum it with some consumer gear on the cheap for a year or so.

Quote:
I will probably want to get a good but not overpriced tough bag to carry all this in.
Yep. I use Lowepro bags most of the time, which are not cheap, but one of my favorite small bags is a Canon. Yes, I carry my Nikon gear in a Canon bag!

Quote:
I will probably try to contact the instructor of those classes & try to find out exactly what I will need.
You'll likely get a terrible answer. Either an "anything will work" type of answer or a "get a Canon Rebel" type answer. If you get anything aside from those two generics (uniformed, I might add) then I'd really be surprised. Shocked, even. They don't really care about you beyond a semester, so the long-term viability of your camera won't be something they'll consider. I'd much rather see you with a setup that will last 5+ years like mine have done for me.

But if funds are an issue, then we'll just scale back to something else. I didn't necessarily select a high-paying profession, so I can completely empathize with your situation. We just have to make do with what we have available.

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