Quantcast Panasonic VCR won't take tape? - digitalFAQ Forum
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12-17-2014, 09:20 PM
bluewater bluewater is offline
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I knew this day would eventually come. My 2002 Panasonic py-y4612s vhs tape recorder has broken. I try and insert a tape and it spits it out at me. Slowly, jerking a little at a time while it clicks and the display panel, dims and brightens while it clicks/jerks the tape out. My philosophy has always been when something breaks, take it apart and see what you can see. Whats the worst that can happen? Its already broken. I took this apart and I can't see anything obviously mechanical that's not right. Nothing looks stuck or broken and there are no loose parts. I can force the tape in with the power off, but it just works to reject it as soon as I power up. I can't find any place that still repairs these and they are no longer available new. Can anybody help? New to the site as I am trying to figure out what is wrong and if it is repairable. Thanks ahead of time.
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12-19-2014, 06:50 AM
dpalomaki dpalomaki is offline
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Do you mean Panasonic PV-V4612S, a stereo VHS VCR?

A number of issues can cause a VCR to fail to load and spit out the tape ranging from mechanical issues to electronic issues to bad sensors in the mechanism to problems with specific tapes.

If serious about repair, you should be able to find a service manual for purchase or download if you do a web search on the model number. However, whether or not it is worth spending any money to repair it is a separate question only you can answer for yourself.

You often can find working VHS VCRs at yard/garage sales and thrift shops for little to no money. Just take a scratch tape (one you are willing to risk) and video-capable display with you to give it a test before you buy. Also you can find this model and other at on-line auctions, but the risk of ending up with a bad one is higher.

Quality refurbished VCRs suitable for use in transfer will run on the order of $300 and more.

Last edited by dpalomaki; 12-19-2014 at 07:01 AM.
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12-19-2014, 11:08 AM
bluewater bluewater is offline
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I thought it may be something simple. I opened it up and don't see anything I can identify. If its a sensor, I wouldn't know. I found a place in Chicago that can repair it. I live in Hawaii. Ya, I am serious about fixing it. I have a bazillion VHS tapes that I watch and I still tape things . I don't think I'll ever make the switch to dvds or dvrs. I kinda new everything else you offered. I am skeptical of buying a used one. Thanks and Happy Holidaze.
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12-19-2014, 12:01 PM
dpalomaki dpalomaki is offline
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One can still find VHS machines, often it is a VHS VCR with a DVD player included, such as the FUNAI DV220FX4, under $100 at B&H Photo and Video. Suitable for home use in non-critical applications. And $100 doesn't go very far in terms of parts and technician time to work on a old consumer player.

If it starts to load, stops and spits out the tape part way into the load cycle, this may imply that something is taking too much force or time, and the the load cycle reverses as a protective measure. This could be caused by foreign material in the mechanism (anything from a piece of PBJ to a gecko tail), a cracked plastic gear (happened to my first RCA VCR in the early 1980s), or just dried out lube making it too stiff. Often models have specific weak points that can be checked, but I have no information on your VCR.

One thing to keep in mind in terms of repairing it. In the end it still is mostly a 12+ year old VCR, a product with a life expectancy of perhaps 7 years. As a point of reference, Panasonic service guidelines for their industrial class VCRs, such as the AG-1970 and AG-1980, call for replacement of the upper cylinder and lubrication every 1000 hours of operation. Over 12 years that amounts to roughly watching one VHS movie a week.
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12-19-2014, 01:21 PM
bluewater bluewater is offline
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I am leery of those combo type of machines. If one function goes, your stuck with a partially functioning machine. I will check that out at B&H though as it makes more sense to by a new one for a hundred bucks then repair an old one.

It actually won't take the tape in, without slight force, compared to the way it used to just suck the tape in. It goes in a little, then it appears the machine is trying to eject it, but is unable. So it just pushes the tape out in small jerking motions a little at a time.

I am fairly certain there is nothing jammed in it. I have taken it apart, what apart it can be taken , and I don't see anything. Its just me. I have been looking at this machine every day, several times a day for 12 years. Its tough to get over it being broken. As time goes on, I watch less and less of anything anymore. I spend most of my viewing time shuttling between the news shows obsessing about how screwed up the world is.

I looked at the Toshiba units that B&H sells on AMAZON. Customer comments were not favorable. FUNAI fared better in the comments section. You seem knowledgeable. Would you know how well the vcr portion of these machines might hold up over time. I am basically trying to replace a viable vcr and its normal functions of timer recording tv shows and movies. I have a dvd player already.
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12-19-2014, 11:56 PM
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An old VHS VCR is usually (99.9%+ of the time) not worth repairing.
And this model is not an exception.

These are the VCRs that are suggested here: VCR Buying Guide (S-VHS, D-VHS, Professional) for best video capturing

Panasonic VCRs of this era were full of image-quality and mechanical-quality issues.

Take this opportunity to upgrade!

- Did my advice help you? Then become a Premium Member and support this site.
- Find television shows, cartoons, DVDs and Blu-ray releases at the TVPast forums.
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