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-   -   How to best transfer analog to digital? (http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-capture/10100-how-best-transfer.html)

three4rd 11-07-2019 10:11 AM

How to best transfer analog to digital?
 
Hi,

Like many people, I have a large collection of vinyl and tapes that I'd like to begin converting to digital. I already have this device https://www.amazon.com/M-Audio-Track.../dp/B000BD31ZW that I use to do guitar recordings directly into my computer garageband software, so I was wondering if all I'd need would be RCA to 1/4" cables? I assume I could run cables from my (vintage!) Kenwood receiver's RCA output jacks into the M-audio's mic / instrument inputs? Or won't that work? Someone suggested that I should use RCA to RCA and use the "unbalanced" outputs (wouldn't that be inputs?) on the M-audio. I've never done any of this transferring before so need to know how best to accomplish it. Thanks....

latreche34 11-07-2019 01:01 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I'm not sure if that device is suitable for capturing audio line level and phono levels for turntables, you probably would need a dedicated USB audio capture device that has the option to accept line level and phono level with a selection switch, Some devices have option to select the phono cartridge impedance like the Terratec device in the picture:

http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/atta...1&d=1573153282

three4rd 11-07-2019 02:00 PM

Interesting, and thanks for the reply. Let me ask this...what do you feel is the simplest way to accomplish what I'm trying to do? I would think that this is something many people have done. I know they make those cabinet-like devices that have a built-in turntable, tape and CD player, etc. that can make the conversions, but can't imagine that it produces real high quality.

I came across this bit of info... "Unlike line level audio sources you connect to a stereo (DVD/CD players, tape decks, TV audio, minidisc, etc.), the output from a magnetic cartridge installed in a good quality turntable is MUCH lower, and requires an additional stage of amplification to bring it up to the same volume as the other sources you listen to thru your stereo. This additional amp stage, the phono preamp, is built-in to most older receivers and amps, allowing direct connection of a turntable. However, newer stereo equipment (including virtually all mini-systems and home theatre units, as well as many stereo receivers and amps), have NO phono input (this because records and turntables are supposedly obsolete in today's world dominated by CDs and DVDs). In order to utilise the inputs such units DO have (Aux, Tape, Line, Video, CD, etc.) to connect a turntable, you need to first pass the signal thru an external phono preamp to bump the level. The same level increase is needed if you're connecting a turntable to a computer sound card's line input so you can make CD-Rs from LPs; again, the external phono preamp provides it."

So, given that my receiver definitely qualifies as one of the "older" units - being a '76 model - do I still need a separate phono pre-amp? I had assumed that I'd be taking the audio signal directly out of my Kenwood receiver rather than from the turntable directly to a digital interface. If coming from an older receiver such as mine, isn't the signal that would be coming out of it already a satisfactorily amplified one?

lingyi 11-07-2019 08:34 PM

Are you using a old regular turntable or a newer turntable (i.e. meant to output directly to line level device). If it's an old turntable, you'll need to use the phono input as a preamp to boost the signal.

There's another crucial aspect of why you must use the phono input or old turntables. RIAA Equalization which was applied to the recording on the record. The curve compresses the lower frequencies and boosts the high frequencies. The pre-amp in your receiver expands the signal in the exact opposite way to get a flat signal. If you want to experiment, you can plug your turntable output directly to the line input on your receiver. The sound will be extremely shrill with almost no bass.

Also, it's unlikely that you have one, but the output of moving coil* (vs. regular moving magnet) cartridges, is so low that an additional phono preamp must be placed between the output from the turntable and the phono input on your receiver.

*Moving Coil cartridges are typically mid-high to extremely high end. With a few exceptions, the best cartridges, even today are moving coil.

lingyi 11-07-2019 08:46 PM

Are you using a old regular turntable or a newer turntable (i.e. meant to output directly to line level device). If it's an old turntable, you'll need to use the phono input as a preamp to boost the signal.

There's another crucial aspect of why you must use the phono input or old turntables. RIAA Equalization which was applied to the recording on the record. The curve compresses the lower frequencies and boosts the high frequencies. The pre-amp in your receiver expands the signal in the exact opposite way to get a flat signal. If you want to experiment, you can plug your turntable output directly to the line input on your receiver. The sound will be extremely shrill with almost no bass.

Also, it's unlikely that you have one, but the output of moving coil cartridges (which are typically mid to high end), is so low that an additional phono preamp must be placed between the output from the turntable and the phono input on your receiver.

latreche34 11-08-2019 11:50 AM

1 Attachment(s)
The capture devices with phono input do have built in phono preamp and that's why I suggested looking for one, By flipping the switch from line in to phono in it activates the built in phono preamp. But if you want to use your receiver that has a phono input and use the line output from it that's fine it's just an extra device in the mix but like lingyi said what kind of phono cartridge it was designed for, Usually most mid 70's and later receivers are designed for moving magnet cartridges.

I personally own the German Terratec device that has 3 settings for phono cartridges and can be used in line in or phono modes, it captures up to 24bit 96Khz, Unfortunately they are no longer made but I would assume similar products should exist.

http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/atta...1&d=1573235776


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