Quantcast Blaupunkt rtv936 hifi - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
10-23-2009, 07:56 AM
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Hey guys, im just wondering if anyone has any information on this product? 'S-VHS BLAUPUNKT RTV936 HIFI' It has almost NO info on the net on it, anyone know anything about it? Does it have TBC? Are BLAUPUNKT machines reliable and high quality?

thanks
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  #2  
10-23-2009, 09:42 PM
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I'm only familiar with that brand from car audio -- and even then that was about 15+ years ago! Don't have much need to play with car audio.

Looking around online a bit, I came across a Youtube video that shows a photo of the Blaupunkt RTV920, which is apparently a clone of the Panasonic NV FS100. If not mistaken, I believe the FS100 is the PAL version of the AG-1970P. The FS200 is the AG-1980P.

The Blaupunkt you ask about may be the AG-1980P -- or maybe not. I just don't know. Do you have a photo of it? That would be the most telling.

On a similar though unrelated topic, here's a comparison of the AG-1970P and AG-1980P units: http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/AG1980.htm

The Youtube video is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0Td0OizOmo - the person turned the VCR upside down and filmed the mechanics in action. Some people sure get bored! Amazing what gets filmed and uploaded these days.

Watch it here:
"Reload page to view video."

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  #3  
10-24-2009, 01:27 AM
ramrod ramrod is offline
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Thanks for the info!
I asked the seller about the player and it doesnt have TBC, its suppsoedly a good player, but doesnt have any of the features im lookign for. so im giving it a miss. Time to keep looking for a pal SVHS player, its impossible to find, its like im asking for the head of Latoya Jackson on a plate. X_X.

Hmmm actually, maybe you can help me here. 95% of the VHS tapes im wanting to transfer are the japanese NTSC VHS. Would i be better off just importing a NTSC SVHS player (i already have a power adapter converting american power plug to australian) and use that? Would it be better quality cos its RAW/ORIGINAL NTSC signal? Would the signal / quality of the video be better if i use the NTSC SVHS player? If so, im tempted in doing that actually.

thanks mate
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  #4  
10-24-2009, 05:03 AM
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Yes, I would suggest an NTSC native player for an NTSC native tape. Use a computer capture card capable of NTSC input, and create NTSC DVDs.

This is actually how I do PAL -- using a native JVC PAL HR-S7965EK player. Everything stays PAL, from VCR to capture card to final DVD. Only when requested to convert PAL to NTSC, will I do so -- and even then, I strongly suggest against it, due to quality loss. Even with our best methods in use, there are various losses because of interlaced framerate changes.

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  #5  
10-24-2009, 05:43 AM
ramrod ramrod is offline
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ohhh wow! im glad i asked, saved me wasting alot of money getting an unnecessary SVHS player. Thanks for that! I experienced when i was using my pal vcr on ntsc tapes, that there was bad interlacing issues etc!

There are only very few VHS tapes in PAL (family ones), that i dont think i would even really bother getting a PAL SVHS recorder for those few. So then i'll still get an NTSC one (and thank god there are quite a few on the market compared to PAL equivalent).

Could you please link me to anyone useful capture card setup guides, or would you be able to state exactly what programs you use? From the best hardware, best software and the best devices to give the best quality capture possible! (For these tapes, im literally wanting MAXIMUM quality possible! I'm going to research it myself too, but since you're an expert, i trust your opinion over alot of what i read on the internet. Im basically wanting best possible video quality cos im a quality freak haha). Does my computer need to be of a certain standard? Do i need a great gfx card? Just incase, ill give you the specs.

Pentium 4 @ 2.6GHz
512 mb ram.
Geforce 4 MX 440 128mb. AGP8x
DX 9.0c
(not sure the rest).
Bought in 2003.


Will this be sufficient PC wise for great quality recordings? I'm a bit phobic when it comes to reencoding things which is what ill have to do with the raw video right? You prefer capture card over DVR? especially for what im intending to achieve?

thanks in advance !!
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  #6  
10-24-2009, 05:50 AM
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Also, my DVR is a pioneer 530-H 160GB that can capture NTSC / PAL 60 streams. Would it be better to use that with an NTSC SVHS player instead of the capture card? the pioneer also comes with some inbuilt filters / controls mentioned in my other posts.
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  #7  
10-24-2009, 09:17 PM
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sorry to comment again lol.
I wasl ooking up capture cards etc, this will be so expensive for me, so i looked into my current setup.
Im thinking it should be OK if i get a NTSC compatible SVHS player (the JVC HR-DVS1ETK miniDV can play NTSC) , my current pioneer DVR-630H http://www.welectronics.com/dvd/pion...DVR-630HS.html has its own TBC and can record both pal and ntsc streams, (not pal60, cos it has colour etc). So would this setup be OK?, it seems to work fine when i recorded the VHS tapes to DVD, (although there was interlacing issues, which i showed you in the other thread), Would that setup be ok? basically. NTSC SVHS > grex > DVD-R Pioneer.
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  #8  
10-24-2009, 10:11 PM
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At 512MB of RAM, your computer may be a little low on memory. Video capture itself does not need the RAM, but the added stresses of video capture may tax the system a bit. What you end up with are dropped frames and audio sync issues, when the system bottlenecks and cannot keep up with the video stream. 1GB of RAM would be better, if you use the computer.

Replacing the AGP video card with an ATI All In Wonder 9000 series card would work well for you. Even a 7000 series card would capture well, although it might be a downgrade on the graphics side, if you play video games that like to eat framerates. I have some older ATI AIW cards that I've considered selling.

Your DVD recorder may work out perfectly fine, if it truly records in NTSC, not just PAL60. From what I've read online and heard from peers, PAL60 is not very common as a capture format anyway, not in DVD recorders. It probably is true NTSC. You'd simply have to test out a NTSC VCR playing an NTSC tape into it, see what it does.

Your Pioneer DVD recorder does not really have a TBC by the definitions we use when discussing advanced capturing. The TBC inside the Pioneer is more closely in line with being a simple frame synchronizer, and is therefore still subject to anti-copy and false anti-copy detection. That is, where your machine thinks your homemade VHS tapes have copy protection. Or when trying to convert commercial video releases. Your Grex would usually serve to remove that signal data, although it's not as foolproof as a full TBC. Works most of the time, not all of the time. How often it fails totally depends on your tapes. For some folks, it's flawless with zero fails.

TBC is such a loose term. It can be defined widely or narrowly, which leads to the confusion about what a TBC does. Or more appropriately, there is confusion over what the "full" definition of a TBC has become in the past 10 years. This is the one I operate on, not the barely-passable definition (older one from decades ago) utilized by marketing goons trying to sell DVD recorders, cameras and other devices.

It sounds like you have a game plan now.

This is the USA version -- http://support.jvc.com/consumer/prod...lId=MODL022175 -- but it looks like a really nice deck. Same gold finish as the HR-S9600 to 9900 models.

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  #9  
10-24-2009, 11:00 PM
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Yeah!!! i finally have a game plan i think will work great!! sorry for all the schizophrenic questions, i bombard you with too many question sometimes haha.

You remember that video clip i sent you (.vob?) you notice the interlacing there? Thats what i get when i record the NTSC VHS onto the Pioneer DVD recorder. I believe im recording it as a NTSC stream and burning a NTSC DVD. Are those interlacing comb lines suppose to be there? its a bit annoying. Or will that be removed when i use an NTSC SVHS player? Is it normal for my NTSC stream to have those? Or will it happen no matter what i do, even if i record on a PC capture card? its just a bit annoying thats all. Is there any way im able to capture the VHS without having them in the recording?

Basically i need to save up for and buy either a JVC HR-DVS1ETK cos it gives a pure NTSC signal, or a decent NTSC SVHS player with TBC. I'll have to keep an eye out on ebay etc, or if someone will sell one.

my setup im thinking is now.
NTSC SVHS > Grex > DVDR
All maintain the NTSC signal. Do you suggest anythign else? If i get a decent TBC in a SVHS player, there is no need for an external TBC like an ADVC300 is there?

thanks again
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  #10  
10-24-2009, 11:31 PM
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I don't recall the VOB at this point in time, no.
VHS is a composite interlaced video format, so you'll get composite color quality with interlacing, yes. But televisions are interlaced displays, so you won't see those comb lines on anything other than computers. And even then, software like VLC has playback filters to decomb the video.

You don't want to deinterlace permanently, you'll damage the quality. Only do it on playback, using the "active" temporary filters in the player program.

You just missed the HR-S7900U I had, sold it to somebody else not 24 hours ago. I do have a HR-S3800U that works very well. It does not have a TBC+DNR to fully remove all possible noise, but it does have some mild filters to control the playback quality. It works best on SP mode tapes. It probably has 2,000 hours (at most) of use, and it was a backup recording deck for about 2-3 years. Most of its life has been on a shelf in a closet. It was tested for playback and recording 2 days ago. Price on it would be $75 USD plus shipping. If you want better than consumer VHS VCR, get this. If you want "the best possible", then pass on it and save up for the high-end VCRs.

NTSC S-VHS VCR > Grex > DVD recorder
No, no external TBC needed.

The ADVC-300 is also not really a "TBC" by our full definition of what most modern TBCs do:
  • namely the ability to ignore copy protection (especially the false anti-copy detections) in a full-frame external unit,
  • and remove/reduce/prevent chroma noise in embedded line TBCs
TBC is such a loose term, in the hands of marketing folks and salesmen. The Canopus products do some frame synchronization. If there is a TBC in there, then it appears to be quite a bit weaker than the one built into JVC VCRs. The device is an expensive consumer/hobby device -- I've never seen one in a professional environment.

The Internet is full of complaints of this unit filtering badly, thinking home movies (weddings, babies, etc) are copy protected and refusing to convert, and just generally not performing as you would expect a $500+ range device.

According to reports from trusted peers, the ADVC-300 filtering quality is similar to that used by Panasonic DVD recorders -- it can over-filter temporally and cook the NTSC color palette. I've seen some samples on projects, it's not very delightful to watch on even a partially calibrated monitor. On top of that, it's using NTSC DV colorspace compression. For PAL captures, color cooking and DV colorspace compression is not an issue -- PAL appears to be largely unaffected.

Some folks consider "TBC" and "frame synchonizer" to be interchangeable terms. I don't know where, why and how the definitions got so mixed up. Studio 1 Productions has an interesting read here: http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/TBC.htm -- I sometimes wonder if Canopus has done just this, confused what a TBC is.

In the high-end S-VHS VCRs, it's actually the TBC that enables the DNR to function well. That's why they units are almost always tied together (for better or worse).

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  #11  
10-26-2009, 04:36 AM
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Ahhh i think i finally understand! because the VHS is analogue (not digital), it is therefore interlaced and will appear on any recordings of VHS! i think i get it now!
Bummer!! i might have bought it!! how much did you sell it for? what prices do they go for usually?
Re: the VCR you're selling, i might give it a miss, thanks anyways, i really prefer a SVHS and am willing to pay extra for the features!

Ahh ok, ill just stick to the JVC SVHS system, cheaper and from what you said ,higher quality!

Now i know where to go from here! i need an NTSC compatible SVHS player. thanks for everything.
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  #12  
11-01-2009, 03:21 PM
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From what I have researched, the Blaupunkt RTV950 (PAL) is the equivalent of the Panasonic NV-FS200 (PAL) and Panasonic AG-1980P (NTSC)

Just FYI.

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