Quantcast Converting VHS/SVHS, mini DV/HDV to digital? - digitalFAQ Forum
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06-13-2017, 04:47 PM
VideoGeek25 VideoGeek25 is offline
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I'd like some advice on a proper setup.

After reading the guides here, I feel that I have the proper SVHS machines. e.g. JVC HR S9500U, JVC HR S9911U, HR S7900U, HM DH30000U, HM DT100U

My first question is about VCRs. After watching a youtube video comparing the PQ of the JVC HR S9900U to the Panasonic AG 1980P, I noticed that the Panasonic had a sharper, better blacks, while the PQ quality outputted from the JVC was too brighter, and paled in comparison to the Panasonic.

I plan to be converting tapes, not only my own, but for other people as well. Is the Panasonic deck a worthy investment to obtain the best PQ? I completely understand that not all tapes play equally, which is why I have multiple machines on hand.

Next, I have several computers, an old Dell Dimension 8300 (2004), and a Dell XPS 8700 (2014). Which PC is recommended for video work, and should I dedicate an entire hard drive for this purpose? I've had issues before with previous machines where I'd capture the video and there would be parts where the audio would playback in slow mo.

Next, which is the best capture card for the purpose of converting VHS/SVHS to DVD? I have several cards at my disposal, a Happuage Collossus card, as well as a Canopus ADVC 110. Should I look for a better card? My goal is to capture these tapes in the highest quality as possible.

Next, I also plan on converting mini DV and HDV tapes to digital, and have several camcorder/playback decks e.g. Sony HDR HC3, Sony HVR Z1U, Sony HVR M25U. I have absolutely no issue with transferring mini DV footage to the computer, but seem to have issue with HDV, regardless of which machine I use. I also have issues whether I transfer it via firewire or HDMI. How can I resolve this issue?

Lastly, what video editing software is the best? I have used Roxio Media Creator's Video Wave for both VHS/SVHS, as well as HDV.
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06-13-2017, 08:20 PM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Welcome to digitalfaq!

Partial answers:

I see no ":brightness" difference between the Panasonic and JVC VCR's (do you really think YouTube is a source for authoritative discussions about video quality?). For various VHS tapes you'll need multiple VCR's. If your tapes are 4-hour or 6-hour slow-speed recordings, JVC is not recommended.

Neither of the capture cards you mention will give the "highest quality" from analog sources.

You said nothing about video restoration and cleanup, mentioning only "editing" with an entry-level NLE not designed for serious video work from analog or consumer DV sources. I don't know how seriously you regard your own video sources but, except for the high quality VCR's which would be rather wasted if used with the other components and software described, the operation you propose could be done by any pharmacy or camera shop selling typically poor quality "digital conversions" from tape. I hope you don't intend to charge real money for using those methods with other people's videos.

DV and HDV sources are not captured. They are copied 1:1 without re-encoding, directly to a computer using various transmission means including FireWire. Never re-encode digital source by re-recording using lossy codecs. Analog sources, meanhile, are optimally captured using devices designed for analog video capture without compression damage (i.e, not devices designed for DV or lossy capture) into lossless working files for archiving and cleanup before encoding.

I'd spend a little more time in preparation and skill-building by browsing some of the many analog capture posts and threads that have appeared here for quite a few years, none of which recommend DV cards for highest quality VHS captures. If you have an older XP machine you can expect some of the world's most accurate captures from analog sources using ATI All In Wonder devices in AGP or PCIe mounts. Slightly higher quality is available (and lower quality as well) at prices 5 to 10 times higher -- price is not an accurate guide, by any means.

The primary DV direct- transfer method for consumer DV source is via FireWire and WinDV. The primary apps for video cleanup/ repair/restoration by serious videophiles and pros alike are Avisynth and Virtualdub (or you can acquire shop grade gear, but for most people that's overkill and budget crazy), after which any NLE from entry-level Cyberlink to Adobe Pro can handle cuts, joins, and encoding (the latter activities describe the meaning of the word "edit", which does not include activities like repair and restoration).

Other readers can offer many more ideas and opinions. Anyway, good luck with your endeavor at whatever quality level you decide to pursue.
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06-13-2017, 11:45 PM
VideoGeek25 VideoGeek25 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
Welcome to digitalfaq!

Partial answers:

I see no ":brightness" difference between the Panasonic and JVC VCR's (do you really think YouTube is a source for authoritative discussions about video quality?). For various VHS tapes you'll need multiple VCR's. If your tapes are 4-hour or 6-hour slow-speed recordings, JVC is not recommended.

Neither of the capture cards you mention will give the "highest quality" from analog sources.

You said nothing about video restoration and cleanup, mentioning only "editing" with an entry-level NLE not designed for serious video work from analog or consumer DV sources. I don't know how seriously you regard your own video sources but, except for the high quality VCR's which would be rather wasted if used with the other components and software described, the operation you propose could be done by any pharmacy or camera shop selling typically poor quality "digital conversions" from tape. I hope you don't intend to charge real money for using those methods with other people's videos.

DV and HDV sources are not captured. They are copied 1:1 without re-encoding, directly to a computer using various transmission means including FireWire. Never re-encode digital source by re-recording using lossy codecs. Analog sources, meanhile, are optimally captured using devices designed for analog video capture without compression damage (i.e, not devices designed for DV or lossy capture) into lossless working files for archiving and cleanup before encoding.

I'd spend a little more time in preparation and skill-building by browsing some of the many analog capture posts and threads that have appeared here for quite a few years, none of which recommend DV cards for highest quality VHS captures. If you have an older XP machine you can expect some of the world's most accurate captures from analog sources using ATI All In Wonder devices in AGP or PCIe mounts. Slightly higher quality is available (and lower quality as well) at prices 5 to 10 times higher -- price is not an accurate guide, by any means.

The primary DV direct- transfer method for consumer DV source is via FireWire and WinDV. The primary apps for video cleanup/ repair/restoration by serious videophiles and pros alike are Avisynth and Virtualdub (or you can acquire shop grade gear, but for most people that's overkill and budget crazy), after which any NLE from entry-level Cyberlink to Adobe Pro can handle cuts, joins, and encoding (the latter activities describe the meaning of the word "edit", which does not include activities like repair and restoration).

Other readers can offer many more ideas and opinions. Anyway, good luck with your endeavor at whatever quality level you decide to pursue.
Thank you for the honest feedback, I truly appreciate. So it seems that for VHS/SVHS media, I should use one JVC deck, (preferably the 9500U), and purchase a Panasonic AG 1980 (I own the AG 1970), but from what I've read, the AG 1980 is superior. Is it recommended to get my VCRs of choice fully serviced before using them to convert tapes?

Since I am seriously committed to achieving the best possible PQ from VHS and SVHS, I forgot to mention this before, but I'm interested in purchasing a TBC as I feel that is it vital to improving the PQ. After reading the Video Hardware Suggestions, I still have a few questions. Would I be better off with the TBC 1000 or the AV 8710? It appears that I can't purchase the TBC 1000 brand new anymore. Which TBC would be the best for restoration and cleanup? (TBC 1000, AV 8710, TBC 4000, TBC 6000?) Would I need anything else aside from a TBC to clean up the video?

As for capture cards, would it be best for me to obtain an NLE capture card such as Canopus DVstorm or the Matrox RT.X100? What makes these cards superior over the Colossus?

As for the mini dv/HDV, is firewire the best way to copy to the PC?

Thanks again for helping out a newbie!

Last edited by VideoGeek25; 06-14-2017 at 12:07 AM.
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06-14-2017, 11:33 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
Thanks again for helping out a newbie!
That's the pruose of forums like this. Except for a few broadcast and restoration pros who've been around, I think everyone here was a newbie at one time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
So it seems that for VHS/SVHS media, I should use one JVC deck, (preferably the 9500U), and purchase a Panasonic AG 1980 (I own the AG 1970), but from what I've read, the AG 1980 is superior. Is it recommended to get my VCRs of choice fully serviced before using them to convert tapes?
The AG-1980 is superior to the 1970 (which itself is not s "bad" player), but don't discard the 1970. Experienced users keep several VCR's to settle tracking issues that another player might not play nice with. The 1970 doesn't have the aging capcaitor issues of a 1980, and most used 1980's you find have been burned to a crisp and really need work. No one pretends that they'[re not expensive, and only a well-trained expert can fix them. We recommend the servics of TGrantPhoto, who also sells rebuilt 1980's and will work on a 1970. https://www.tgrantphoto.com/sales/in...fessional-vcrs

Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
After reading the Video Hardware Suggestions, I still have a few questions. Would I be better off with the TBC 1000 or the AV 8710? It appears that I can't purchase the TBC 1000 brand new anymore. Which TBC would be the best for restoration and cleanup? (TBC 1000, AV 8710, TBC 4000, TBC 6000?) Would I need anything else aside from a TBC to clean up the video?
The main difference between the TBC1000, TBC 400, etc., is that bigger numbers mean more inputs/outputs. One is all you need. The AVT-8710 has had QC issues for some years now, the only ones suggested are those sold in our own marketplace section -- mainly because the sellers know these 8710's actually work as advertised, something not easy to find. The other TBC's you mention tend to soften videos, but they're still favorites if you can find a proper unit. None of these used-and-working units are cheap.

A couple of discussions about tbc's, if you haven't seen these posts already. Each discusses the two typesw of tbc and what they do. Both types are essential:
Recommended TBC? AVT-8710 vs. TBC-1000?
What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes
One workaround if a decent frame-level tbc isn't available would be a pass-thru unit, used by many. The downside is that they don't defeat Macrovision if that's an issue, but they do offer a decent level of frame sync. One log thread on the subject with a great many posts and tests: https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/...hat-do-you-use


Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
As for capture cards, would it be best for me to obtain an NLE capture card such as Canopus DVstorm or the Matrox RT.X100? What makes these cards superior over the Colossus?
The software packages that come with those cards are nice editors, but not restoration tools. Neither will capture VCHS/SVHS to losssless media. If you plan on repair, color correction, etc., capturing noisy analog to lossy media will cripple your effort from the start. When it comes to DV, remember that DV is copied, not captured, so neither card would be a choice for DV source direct-copy. Those who've used the cards you mention can correct me on the relevance of certain models, as I gave up capturing analog tape to lossy DV media years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
As for the mini dv/HDV, is firewire the best way to copy to the PC?
Yes.

Among the best products ever made for analog capture were the ATI All In Wonder series, with the old AGP mounts preferred, newer PCIe mounts second, and the hard to find ATI 600 USB device still offering excellent capture-only performance. A run-down on the history of the AIW line, plus some other AIW discussions and divers in this thread: ATI All In Wonder Hacks, Drivers, Codecs and MMC

Analog source is usually captured to losslsessly compressed YUY2 using huffyuv or Lagarith losssless codecs. AIW's can also capture to broadcast-grade high bitrate MPEG2 for archiving, although it's a step down from lossless when it comes to restoration and repair and requires smart rendering NLE's for simple edits. The favorite capture software for lossless capture is the free Virtualdub (which you'll need anyway) or AmarecTV.

If you want to know what's involved with restoration and repair, especially with VHS/SVHS, there's good news and there's bad news. Many pristine, well-kept tapes go through with very little work, others are more commonly a challenge. Try browsing the restoration forum for samples, both nice and not-nice, of what you can expect from some analog sources: http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-restore/
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06-16-2017, 09:23 PM
VideoGeek25 VideoGeek25 is offline
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Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
That's the pruose of forums like this. Except for a few broadcast and restoration pros who've been around, I think everyone here was a newbie at one time.

The AG-1980 is superior to the 1970 (which itself is not s "bad" player), but don't discard the 1970. Experienced users keep several VCR's to settle tracking issues that another player might not play nice with. The 1970 doesn't have the aging capcaitor issues of a 1980, and most used 1980's you find have been burned to a crisp and really need work. No one pretends that they'[re not expensive, and only a well-trained expert can fix them. We recommend the servics of TGrantPhoto, who also sells rebuilt 1980's and will work on a 1970. https://www.tgrantphoto.com/sales/in...fessional-vcrs


The main difference between the TBC1000, TBC 400, etc., is that bigger numbers mean more inputs/outputs. One is all you need. The AVT-8710 has had QC issues for some years now, the only ones suggested are those sold in our own marketplace section -- mainly because the sellers know these 8710's actually work as advertised, something not easy to find. The other TBC's you mention tend to soften videos, but they're still favorites if you can find a proper unit. None of these used-and-working units are cheap.

A couple of discussions about tbc's, if you haven't seen these posts already. Each discusses the two typesw of tbc and what they do. Both types are essential:
Recommended TBC? AVT-8710 vs. TBC-1000?
What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes
One workaround if a decent frame-level tbc isn't available would be a pass-thru unit, used by many. The downside is that they don't defeat Macrovision if that's an issue, but they do offer a decent level of frame sync. One log thread on the subject with a great many posts and tests: https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/...hat-do-you-use


The software packages that come with those cards are nice editors, but not restoration tools. Neither will capture VCHS/SVHS to losssless media. If you plan on repair, color correction, etc., capturing noisy analog to lossy media will cripple your effort from the start. When it comes to DV, remember that DV is copied, not captured, so neither card would be a choice for DV source direct-copy. Those who've used the cards you mention can correct me on the relevance of certain models, as I gave up capturing analog tape to lossy DV media years ago.

Yes.

Among the best products ever made for analog capture were the ATI All In Wonder series, with the old AGP mounts preferred, newer PCIe mounts second, and the hard to find ATI 600 USB device still offering excellent capture-only performance. A run-down on the history of the AIW line, plus some other AIW discussions and divers in this thread: ATI All In Wonder Hacks, Drivers, Codecs and MMC

Analog source is usually captured to losslsessly compressed YUY2 using huffyuv or Lagarith losssless codecs. AIW's can also capture to broadcast-grade high bitrate MPEG2 for archiving, although it's a step down from lossless when it comes to restoration and repair and requires smart rendering NLE's for simple edits. The favorite capture software for lossless capture is the free Virtualdub (which you'll need anyway) or AmarecTV.

If you want to know what's involved with restoration and repair, especially with VHS/SVHS, there's good news and there's bad news. Many pristine, well-kept tapes go through with very little work, others are more commonly a challenge. Try browsing the restoration forum for samples, both nice and not-nice, of what you can expect from some analog sources: http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/video-restore/
Ok, after reading everything, I have put put together a list of items that are necessary to obtain the pq I want in transferring VHS/SVHS/mini dv/HDV to digital. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Video decks:
JVC Super VHS deck
Panasonic AG 1980 (for 4 hour and 6 hour tapes)
Multisystem VCR (I have an AG W1, are there any SVHS multi system decks?)
Sony HDV VTR (I have the M25U)
3 High Quality S Video cables
3 High quality stereo cables
2 High quality Video (yellow) cables
1 High quality IEE1394 cable
AVT 8710 TBC

Computer Equipment: (Is Windows XP necessary? One of my Dells is a Dimension 8400 with a P4 and 3.4 ghz. The other is a Dell XPS 8700 core i7)
3 TB HDD dedicated to video transfer
NLE capture card (either Canopus DVstorm or Matrox RT.X100)
mentioned capture software
DVD or Blu Ray burner
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06-17-2017, 03:57 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
JVC Super VHS deck
Panasonic AG 1980 (for 4 hour and 6 hour tapes)
The 1980 is the best way to play slow-speed tapes. But the idea behind owning more than one VCR is to pick the best player for individual tapes. Very few advanced users would limit themselves to a single VCR for many reasons, one reason being tracking issues.

Note on the AVT-8710:
- Make sure you get one that actually works.
- DV and HDV sources don't need the AVT-8710. The 8710 is for analog tape captures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoGeek25 View Post
Ok, after reading everything, I have put put together a list of items that are necessary to obtain the pq I want
.....NLE capture card (either Canopus DVstorm or Matrox RT.X100)
I can appreciate your research, but I'm afraid you're confused about the analog capture process and the DV/HDV transfer process.

Firewire transfer of DV-to-DV via Firewire direct copy is best done with WinDV software, which requires XP. Here's where you can download the original free software: http://windv.mourek.cz/. Get it before their website disappears because DV is an obsolete format whose support is quickly disappearing from many systems.

The Canopus and Matrox cards should not be used to capture analog VHS/SVHS to lossy media unless you want to start your analog capture process with lower wuality captures, using methods and media that ensure further quality loss down the road. Since you have XP machines for capture, use any of the ATI All In Wonder AGP or PCIe cards for capture to lossless media (ATI All In Wonder Hacks, Drivers, Codecs and MMC). Or use a newer recommended USB analog capture devices such as the ATI 600 USB, the Hauppauge 610 USB-Live 2, or the Diamond VC500. The VC500 is still in production, is in popular use, works at least as well with lossless capture as the other USB's recommended, and has updated drivers for everything from Windows XP to windows 10. Using a capture device optimized for capture of analog source, the best recommended capture software would be the free VirtualDub or AmarecTV. Losslessly compressed working files can be used with avisynth, Virtualdub, and just about anyone's NLE for further enhancement and final encoding.

The best quality will come with the All in Wonder cards and one of your XP machines. ATI All In Wonders also offer very good capture directly to high-bitrate MPGE2, if that's in your workflow and if extensive repair or image enhancement is not your main target.

Firewire direct-copy transfer of HDV tape is also disappearing. I'm not completely familiar with it, but it's important to avoid re-encoding lossy HDv by simply re-recording with the expensive cards you mention. I was under the impression that HDV cameras came with software for transferring HDV content to a computer. In any case, the last recommended HDv/Firewire software I recall reading about was difficult to search down, but it's HDVSplit and a few other ideas (https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/...PC#post1454604). HDV Split is here: https://www.videohelp.com/software/HDVSplit.

Other HDV users in the forum might have better ideas for HDV. You'll need a newer and faster computer to work with HDV. I don't think your older PC's will be fast enough.
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06-17-2017, 11:05 AM
VideoGeek25 VideoGeek25 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlyn View Post
The 1980 is the best way to play slow-speed tapes. But the idea behind owning more than one VCR is to pick the best player for individual tapes. Very few advanced users would limit themselves to a single VCR for many reasons, one reason being tracking issues.

Note on the AVT-8710:
- Make sure you get one that actually works.
- DV and HDV sources don't need the AVT-8710. The 8710 is for analog tape captures.

I can appreciate your research, but I'm afraid you're confused about the analog capture process and the DV/HDV transfer process.

Firewire transfer of DV-to-DV via Firewire direct copy is best done with WinDV software, which requires XP. Here's where you can download the original free software: http://windv.mourek.cz/. Get it before their website disappears because DV is an obsolete format whose support is quickly disappearing from many systems.

The Canopus and Matrox cards should not be used to capture analog VHS/SVHS to lossy media unless you want to start your analog capture process with lower wuality captures, using methods and media that ensure further quality loss down the road. Since you have XP machines for capture, use any of the ATI All In Wonder AGP or PCIe cards for capture to lossless media (ATI All In Wonder Hacks, Drivers, Codecs and MMC). Or use a newer recommended USB analog capture devices such as the ATI 600 USB, the Hauppauge 610 USB-Live 2, or the Diamond VC500. The VC500 is still in production, is in popular use, works at least as well with lossless capture as the other USB's recommended, and has updated drivers for everything from Windows XP to windows 10. Using a capture device optimized for capture of analog source, the best recommended capture software would be the free VirtualDub or AmarecTV. Losslessly compressed working files can be used with avisynth, Virtualdub, and just about anyone's NLE for further enhancement and final encoding.

The best quality will come with the All in Wonder cards and one of your XP machines. ATI All In Wonders also offer very good capture directly to high-bitrate MPGE2, if that's in your workflow and if extensive repair or image enhancement is not your main target.

Firewire direct-copy transfer of HDV tape is also disappearing. I'm not completely familiar with it, but it's important to avoid re-encoding lossy HDv by simply re-recording with the expensive cards you mention. I was under the impression that HDV cameras came with software for transferring HDV content to a computer. In any case, the last recommended HDv/Firewire software I recall reading about was difficult to search down, but it's HDVSplit and a few other ideas (https://forum.videohelp.com/threads/...PC#post1454604). HDV Split is here: https://www.videohelp.com/software/HDVSplit.

Other HDV users in the forum might have better ideas for HDV. You'll need a newer and faster computer to work with HDV. I don't think your older PC's will be fast enough.
I completely understand about having multiple VCRs as even the best machine isn't the answer for all tapes. I've got that base covered, as I almost own every single JVC SVHS deck from the HR S7000U to the HM DT100U. I only decided on the HR S9500U as imo the pq was much closer to a standard def DVD than any other machine. I also own most of the later JVC machines (JVC HR S7500U, JVC HR S9500U, JVC HR S7900U, JVC HR S9911U, JVC SR V101US, JVC SR W5U). Although the original SVHS machines were built like tanks, given their vintage ('87 - '95), their video image had much more video noise, and the colors were washed out when compared to the later machines. In my tests, the 9500U also beat out the DVHS models.

I'll start searching for one of the ATI All in Wonder cards for the XP PC.

Given that HDV wouldn't work well with the XP PC, I can use the XP PC for the VHS/SVHS, and then use my core i7 machine for HDV.
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06-17-2017, 11:31 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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All sounds good. The XP units are also best for DV 1-to-1 transfer with WinDV, which won't work with later OS's. I've captured for years with AIW cards and older XP PC's, archiving those lossless captures on external USB drives and pulling them off as needed with a newer machine for faster restoration work and encoding -- which is the way many advanced users do it. It's nice to have huge hard drives on a computer but the consensus is that external drives are safer and more efficient for storage than a working PC, which is best used for the grunt work. Working PC drives are subject to more stress than external storage drives.
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06-18-2017, 11:33 PM
msgohan msgohan is offline
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Despite the name, the Canopus DVStorm actually can capture to lossless, but since it's limited to XP anyway you may as well get an AIW instead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldwingfahrer View Post
I have tested the Matrox with the Canopus DV Storm ..... has won the Canopus.
test is available from the INet, but only in German.

Advantage of the DV Storm ... I could order in uncompressed UYVY capturen.Perfekt.
In the old Canopus forum with over 5000 members, I was the only one who has it figured out.
First, many members have laughed ... but later no longer.
I think VideoGeek25's leaning toward those two super-old cards was based on the old guide that's posted up on the main pages of DigitalFAQ that talks up those "$1000 cards". In the newer thread the above quote is from, lordsmurf says that he never bothered buying them because the AIW did the job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldwingfahrer View Post
I can only write for Pal.

The whole thing is quite simple.
Canopus NX Map [PCI, or PCI-E]
or if an old PC with Win XP is available this also with the Canopus DV Storm via Y / C [UYVY]

With the NX card Edius must be installed ... version. 4.xx or 5.xx or 6.08 or 7.50

With the DV Storm can be capturt with VirtualDub.
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06-19-2017, 03:56 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Some interesting news about the old Canopus model, but why bother when a legacy AIW could perform about as well without installing a ton of software that can't compete with Avisynth/VirtualDub for restoration.. If Virtualdub+lossless compression is possible with the product, and if a user happens onto a working model, of course it could work. I would imagine there are many more used AIW's around in AGP or PCI mount than $1000 DataStorms. But you never know these days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by msgohan View Post
I think VideoGeek25's leaning toward those two super-old cards was based on the old guide that's posted up on the main pages of DigitalFAQ that talks up those "$1000 cards". In the newer thread the above quote is from, lordsmurf says that he never bothered buying them because the AIW did the job.
The old capture and restoration guide is still one of the best around, in principle, but its dated portions can easily confuse newbies. So I always hesitate these days before recommending it. When I do so I have to post a paragraph of cautions and caveats before posting the link.
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06-28-2017, 10:17 PM
VideoGeek25 VideoGeek25 is offline
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Well, so far I've ordered:

ATI All in Wonder 9800 Pro
2 X Hitachi Ultrastar 2TB HDD
Panasonic AG 1980P (Southern Advantage)
AVT 8710
cables
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06-29-2017, 03:46 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Those are all good choices. If usage tweaks are needed or problems occur, there are hundreds of posts in this forum you can consult. There are many readers who use those same components and who can reply to questions posted.

A tip on large, multiple hard drives. Computers are busy working devices, not storage warehouses. Active internal hard drives are subject to continuous stress. Most experienced users store original captures, many working project backup files, special download archives such as original filter downloads, specialty program and utillity downloads, saved internet articles, and other valued data on external hard drives. If you want to know how this stuff adds up, over the past few years I've collected six 1-TB drives strictly for storage. That doesn't even count other drives that contain only saved movies. From other posts I understand that some users have even more storage than I do (I don't know how they manage!). In short, use internal hard drives for active work. Use external drives for storage. You'd be surprised how tough it is to maintain big internal drives that are in constant use.
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06-29-2017, 09:37 PM
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Although I happen to think that the Dynamic Drum machines give me the best picture quality, I'm concerned about the overall reliability of the machines due to the Dynamic Drum gears. I found the 9500 to have great picture quality, but hate the idea of those gears seizing up, and having to open the unit to reset the gears.

Since I plan on using a JVC machine quite a bit, what are some good alternatives to those Dynamic Drum machines? With the exception of an HR S9400U, any other machines I've gotten in the 9500 7500 9800 have seized up on occasion.

Here are some of the machines I was thinking of: JVC SR VS30U, Sony SLV R1000
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