Quantcast Getting MPEG2 artifacts with DVD encoding from AVI/HuffYUV source - digitalFAQ Forum
Go Back    Forum > Digital Video > Video Project Help > Encode, Convert for discs

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
08-16-2010, 01:16 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
I am taking a 5GB (12 min) AVI file captured from ATI 9000 AIW using the HuffYUV codec (720x480 NTSC, 48-kHz/16-bit PCM audio), transferring it a Mac and then using Final Cut Studio 2's Compressor application to encode to MPEG2. (Note: This is a proof test, to check out some issues I was seeing with the MPEG2 encoding output when using FCP to edit this source file and then encode later for DVD using DVD Studio Pro. FCP requires intermediate codec conversion, and the rendered editable material still looks very good, but the MPEG2 final result does not. So now I am ruling out the intermediate compression step).

So even with this straight encode from the AVI/HuffYUV file to MPEG2, I see artifacts in the output that look like mostly vertical lines (maybe a little horiz too), some unwanted "texture", wherever there is motion. Kind of like the image is being viewed through piece of glass with small ridges in it, just around the items that are moving. Is this macroblock noise? It's not terrible, but it certainly is not as clean as the source AVI when viewed with VLC player, and I don't feel that it's acceptable enough for the final DVD. My final DVD will need to store 2 hours of similar source video, so it may only get worse.

I have read your guide on converting using TMPGenc, and can see that more control over the compression would probably be helpful. I may be able to do this in Compressor, but want to understand the cause first. The setting I am using is called "High Quality DVD 90 minute" (for up to 90 min on single side DVD), and it looks like it's using 6.25 Mbps CBR. It results in an output file size that is 1/10 the size of the original (~5GB to ~500 MB). This is the highest quality setting it offers for the DVD category, so that seems low for the bit rate. I have done several conversions of DV-source (from camera) to DVD with Compressor and those do not show this type of noise, so I suspect I need to tweak something to work better with this type of source video.

I am wondering if this is surprising for a short video to be encoding with visible noise at that bitrate. I don't have it in front of me to give some of the other settings for this encoder choice, but can get those if it would help. I am wondering which encoding settings will best beat down this type of artifact.

thanks!!

Last edited by bbartley9; 08-16-2010 at 02:09 PM. Reason: add more info
Reply With Quote
Someday, 12:01 PM
admin's Avatar
Ads / Sponsors
 
Join Date: ∞
Posts: 42
Thanks: ∞
Thanked 42 Times in 42 Posts
  #2  
08-16-2010, 05:03 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
Adding attachments to show details of source and output files, and the encoder settings


Attached Files
File Type: txt HuffYUV_AVI.txt (2.0 KB, 6 downloads)
File Type: txt Mpeg2Output.txt (1.7 KB, 3 downloads)
File Type: txt MPEG2_encoder.txt (748 Bytes, 2 downloads)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
08-17-2010, 03:06 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
Quote:
Final Cut Studio 2's Compressor application to encode to MPEG2
This is the weak link in your chain.

Compressor is not, and never really was, a great encoder. It was simply one of the few Mac OS MPEG encoders available during a certain era. Prior to that, your choices were really limited to Quicktime or Cleaner.

Quite a few encoders have come and gone, for OS X. Mostly gone.

While this may be out of your budget, it's worth mentioning that MainConcept only recently (just a few weeks ago!) released a Mac OS X version of their MainConcept Reference encoder.

Download demo here: http://downloads.mainconcept.com/mdl...Mac_v2.1.0.zip
Buy it here ($520): http://esd.element5.com/product.html...teid=200090279

Reference is an open "free" application. You buy the codecs you want to encode into. Some codecs operate in demo mode (adds watermark) until purchased. For example, I bought the MPEG-2 and AVC/H.264 codecs for this computer.

Quote:
The setting I am using is called "High Quality DVD 90 minute" (for up to 90 min on single side DVD), and it looks like it's using 6.25 Mbps CBR. It results in an output file size that is 1/10 the size of the original (~5GB to ~500 MB). This is the highest quality setting it offers for the DVD category, so that seems low for the bit rate.
That's a terrible setting for noisy 720x480 video. Even at two-pass VBR, you'd be compressing into a range that would start to easily show noise. CBR is simply not good enough here. Save CBR for 8000+ kpbs (8.0Mbps+).

Either configure it to use VBR with higher bitrates (especially a max in the 8.0 range), or use another encoder.

Quote:
I have done several conversions of DV-source (from camera) to DVD with Compressor and those do not show this type of noise, so I suspect I need to tweak something to work better with this type of source video.
Okay, now you're on to something here. The DV source from the camera is what we could call "clean" source. (Excluding the motion aspect, unless it was tripod shot or otherwise steadied by hardware or electronics.)

Analog-in source, especially from VHS, S-VHS, Video8 / 8mm and Hi8 is very noisy. All that HuffYUV did was preserve all the picture detail AND noise, so that you could filter it out cleaner before encoding to a compressed format, as well as apply multi-pass VBR encoding.

Compression by its very nature enhances noise. This is why hardware (and sometimes software) filtering is most important. The higher the compression (lower the bit rates), the more obvious the noise. The lower the compression (more bitrate), the less obvious the noise. Noise inhibits the effectiveness of compression, allowing for noise (like visible macroblock edges) to more easily happen as compared to the clean source.

Quote:
I have read your guide on converting using TMPGenc, and can see that more control over the compression would probably be helpful.
While I like TMPGEnc for various uses, and suggest that everybody owns a copy, given the cheap $37 price, it's going to fall between Compressor and Mainconcept for quality. It's a slower encoder, and can somewhat soften video in its avoidance of block edge noise (compared to just MC, not all MPEG encoders), and then it reaches a noise threshold faster than MainConcept will do. In other words, the same video encoded in both programs may appear slightly noisy and maybe softer from TMPGEnc, as compared to what MainConcept Reference outputs.

MC is simply a great encoder. It's like comparing a good highway car that you or I would drive to a professional race car. Yes, the highway car you can afford goes fast, but the pro race car is in a class of its own, when discussing speed. Thankfully, $520 is still affordable for this "race car". (Not cheap, no, but doesn't require the re-mortgage of a house, either!)

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
08-17-2010, 04:26 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
Thanks for the help! MainConcept may be out of my budget range for now, though it may become a necessity if I can't get better results with Compressor. Compressor came with DVD Studio Pro (in Final Cut Studio 2) so I expected it to be good quality. Maybe the pros use their own encoders in this case, for DVD authoring.

I did find out how to setup custom encoding profiles for Mpeg2 in Compressor, and it seems to give about the same level of control as TMPGenc, and some filters, so I will be experimenting to see what I can improve.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
08-17-2010, 04:42 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
Apple bought out a number of products and companies, and then proceeded to shun Adobe at it's own peril. DVD Studio Pro was a redo of Spruce-Up, while Compressor was (I believe) based off something else Apple had gobbled up. At the time, it was noted as a cheap encoder, but with decent performance on non-noisy encoding. Again, that reflects your observations between DV camera material and analog transfers.

So no, don't assume it's good quality just because it came with DVDSP and FCP. In those early days, Apple video software was well behind what was being offered on Windows. It mostly suffered a time delay, as the Windows-origin software was being ported to Mac hardware, with little made by way of advancements.

Had Apple not made the bonehead move to shun Adobe, the old cliche of "Mac is for artists" might still have truth to it. As it stands, even with the addition of Adobe products (as of CS3) and the return of MainConcept to Mac (v1.5 was short-lived), there are so many Windows-entrenched videographers out there, and software to meet their many demands, that Mac is out of the game. It's a great DV workflow solution, but it pretty much sucks at everything else. It either cannot do certain tasks, or it's wholly inferior to the options available on a Windows-based system.

IMPORTANT NOTE: I have nothing against Mac. I've been using Apple computers longer than Windows computers. But both are just tools to me, and the best tool is always used. for the task at hand For many things video, a Mac is the wrong tool. I would have to say that most pros do not use a Mac for MPEG encoding. Most pro software and hardware has been Windows-only for almost a decade now, with few exceptions. On the other hand, DVD Studio Pro is a wonderful authoring package, and I mostly use a Mac for this sole purpose.

If you really filter the video, and tweak the settings at a custom level, Compressor may give decent results. Note that it may be softer quality, similar to TMPGEnc. That's been noted many times, too, in various encoder tests and amongst pros. MainConcept will be much better. Newer versions of Compressor should be much improved, too.

Sorenson Squeeze is often regarded as better than Compressor. And in turn, MainConcept is often placed above Squeeze (especially at H.264). Not all SDK use of the MC encoder is the same, either. MainConcept's own app is arguably better than implementations used by Adobe, Sony, Apple, etc.

Episode is another option, but that's one I've not used to date. Opinions on better/worse vary, in comparison to MainConcept. I'd say it's near-unanimous at Episode being better than Quicktime or Compressor. Epsiode is often touted as better than Squeeze, although Sorenson has its fans.

All of the pro encoders run about $500 range.

If you want to compare to open-source options, use FFMPEG in Handbrake. That one can be better than some of the pro options (sadly), though not MainConcept. This one's for H.264, however, not MPEG-2 for DVD-Video. ffmpegX encodes to MPEG-2 for DVD-Video.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
08-18-2010, 07:32 AM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
Great, thanks for the help. I was able to reduce the noise quite a bit in Compressor by copying one of the canned settings to a new one, and editing all the controls to increase bitrate and apply a noise filter (tried with and without the filter). Yep, soft output with no noise. It's better, but not as good as it probably could be.

Then I downloaded MainConcept (demo) and tried that. Wow, big difference! Came out looking almost identical to the source when viewed with VLC (except . Too bad watermarks aren't in vogue So, I'll have to consider that, and I'll also look at some of the other options you mentioned here. Thanks again, it has been a big help.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
08-20-2010, 01:34 AM
Steve(MS) Steve(MS) is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 126
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by admin View Post
Not all SDK use of the MC encoder is the same, either. MainConcept's own app is arguably better than implementations used by Adobe, Sony, Apple, etc.

All of the pro encoders run about $500 range.

If you want to compare to open-source options, use FFMPEG in Handbrake. That one can be better than some of the pro options (sadly), though not MainConcept. This one's for H.264, however, not MPEG-2 for DVD-Video. ffmpegX encodes to MPEG-2 for DVD-Video.
Concerning AVI to MPG,
TMPGenc 2.5, around 40 dollars and the next step
up is a 500 dollar encoder?
That appears to be a big chasm, wonder why no one has tried to fill the void?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
08-20-2010, 10:05 AM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
I have been experimenting with ffmepgX on Mac, which is a GUI for the ffmeg and mpeg2enc encoders, among others. It works pretty well, and I like the .m2v outputs better than anything I can get from Compressor (v 3.0.3). Problem is, everything I have encoded using ffmpegX gives me an "internal muxer error" in DVD Stuido Pro 4 when it comes time to build/burn it. I have tweaked just about every setting I can in ffmpegX to see if they are causing the issue, but so far to no avail. These files play fine in VLC, and the output from MediaInfo for Mac doesn't show any strangeness that I can see. DVDSP just doesn't like them. So I posted the question & info on ffmpegX's support forum (set up at videohelp.com) and hopefully can get some help on resolving that. I still like the MainConcept Reference (for Mac) output the best, but am not sure I can swing the purchase right now.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
08-20-2010, 10:22 AM
Steve(MS) Steve(MS) is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 126
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Some of the guys over on videohelp like hcenc better than anything else.
I just downloaded but haven't got beyond that.
It appears it needs other programs for it to work to tell it what to do, some mention avisynth and cd fit.
I think it can use other programs also but some of them are buggy.
I am hoping to find an easy guide somewhere to try it out.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
08-20-2010, 12:33 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
I'm not all that fond of the majority of free encoders. I would say HCEnc is maybe better than others in the same price range ($0), but that's about it. Even TMPGEnc for $37 can be better, although slower. A lot of those free MPEG encoders are designed for speed, not quality. TMPGEnc was designed for quality, not speed. High end pro software like MainConcept and Procoder were designed with both quality and speed in mind, with quality being the more important of the two. That's one reason you pay so much for it.

A lot of free encoders are just programmers reverse engineering commercial coding, and then stealing code from each other, to make the next "best" free encoder. I often think there's not a lot of talent -- it's a shallow pool. The real talent is being paid by the software companies. (I would note that some of them did start out making freeware, such as the creator of DVD Shrink, who moved on to Ahead/Nero software, and then no idea where he went from there.)

Indeed, most of the freeware encoders are very raw, requiring other interfaces to actually use them. Unfortunately, some of those GUIs and front-ends are not made all that well, either, picking poor settings or not fully understanding the encoders. Again, that's the difference between MainConcept, which comes with a full GUI of all available options, and something like x264, which is either command-line or relies on a GUI/front-end programmer knowing what he's doing.

More often than not, the encoders work okay (not the best quality, but not awful), and it's the interfaces made by others that are buggy. The same is true of many audio encoders, such as Lame, which relies on something like Besweet or what-have-you to actually interface with it. Unless you want to go back to DOS-style computing, that is!

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
08-20-2010, 12:37 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbartley9 View Post
Problem is, everything I have encoded using ffmpegX gives me an "internal muxer error" in DVD Stuido Pro 4 when it comes time to build/burn it. .
I don't use this software enough to know all it's intricacies, but I have seen strange things in the past. For example, a program stream (muxed M2V + nothing) with a .m2v extension. It was not a proper elementary stream. I had to rename the file to .mpg and then demux it in TMPGEnc.

See what that does for you.

I don't really have any other guesses for you right now. I have a feeling I'm missing some information, however. DVDSP4 is being given a M2V file? Separate audio file is encoded properly?

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
08-20-2010, 01:04 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
DVDSP4 does take the .m2v file (and a little progress bar pops up that takes about 5 secs to complete ... not sure if it's just loading/copying it or doing some conversion). Then I import the audio file (AC3) and it imports OK and plays back in "preview" (both video and audio do) in DVDSP4. ffmpegX also creates a .MPG file, but DVDSP won't import that, only the separate video & audio.

I can try the step you mentioned. Here is the output of the analysis done on the .m2v (using MediaInfo for Mac), and I think things look OK. The total number of frames (4509) is higher than the original source (4503, I think), but I am not sure if that's normal:

Report for file: wed422HQTitling.mov.ff.m2v

General / Container Stream #1
Total Video Streams for this File.................1
Video Codecs Used.................................MPEG-2 Video
File Format.......................................MPEG Video
Play Time.........................................2mn 30s
Total File Size...................................138 MiB
Total Stream BitRate..............................7 698 Kbps
Video Stream #1
Codec (Human Name)................................MPEG Video
Codec Profile.....................................Main@M ain
Frame Width.......................................720 pixels
Frame Height......................................480 pixels
Frame Rate........................................29.970 fps
Total Frames......................................4509
Display Aspect Ratio..............................4:3
Video Standard....................................NTSC
Scan Type.........................................Inter laced
Scan Order........................................TFF
Color Space.......................................YUV
QF (like Gordian Knot)............................0.713
Codec Settings (Matrix)...........................Default
Video Stream Length...............................2mn 30s 434ms
Video Stream BitRate..............................7 386 Kbps
Video Stream BitRate (Nominal)....................7 800 Kbps
Video Stream BitRate Mode.........................VBR
Bit Depth.........................................8 bits
Video Stream Size.................................132 MiB (96%)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
08-20-2010, 01:12 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve(MS) View Post
Concerning AVI to MPG, TMPGenc 2.5, around 40 dollars and the next step up is a 500 dollar encoder?
That appears to be a big chasm, wonder why no one has tried to fill the void?
Not really. Most professional grade software relies on ground-up research and development (R&D), and that carries high costs.

Once upon a time, programmers were paid "too much", but various economic and IT industry factors have wiped that out, as far as I know. They get normal salaries like everybody else. There is still some issues with "corporate profits" of course, but I don't know that somebody as small as MainConcept or Adobe is as vulgar with executive pay as large companies like Exxon, Microsoft or Sony. These days, I think a lot of it does actually go towards the research and development (paying teams of programmers).

A lot of other software is one-man/few-man copycats, often reverse engineering what was done, then trying to "do it cheaper". In the case of time-oriented tasks, like video encoding, they also promise to "do it faster". The compromise always comes at quality. You see this a lot with cheap and crappy $30-50 Chinese software, using all sorts of random names you've never heard of -- and in a few years, they'll disappear again.

TMPGEnc Plus is an anomaly, more than anything else. It's an extension of the Tsunami MPEG Encoder, an MPEG-1 encoding program shareware/freeware from 2000. At one point in time, TMPGEnc Plus was quite a bit more than $37. I don't remember the price anymore. It may have been as high as $99. I would wager that it's only still available due to demand. It's not often that you see a program sell, almost unchanged, for 8 years straight. It's just that good.

Canopus and CinemaCraft both released consumer versions of their encoders several years ago for under $100 -- Canopus Procoder Express and CinemaCraft Basic. But I guess both flopped in the market, as these only last for one version. Or at least, I only remember one version, for about a year, around 2005 or so. The programs were too limited for most needs (720x480 only, DVD MPEG-2 only, etc), for the audience that likely would have paid $100. And the tool was too limited for the dumb consumer that expects one program to edit, encode, burn a DVD and make them breakfast with two mouse clicks, with a $50 budget. Even something as simple as the ability to encoder 352x480 for MPEG-2 would have pleased many users. But no, that required the "full version" for about $600 to Procoder, or $2000 to CCE. Instead of pleasing those users, and selling them a sub-$100 program, many of them simply resorted to piracy or defected to mid-priced program like MainConcept. Canopus and CCE made $0 from that boneheaded move.

Earlier on, MainConcept was in the $150-250 range, from the pre-Reference era (MC versions 1.3 to 1.5). The price has gone up quite a bit in the past 6 years, since it was released. When it moved to the Reference system, cost about doubled for the MPEG-2 encoder. This may be due to the inclusion of HD resolution encoding options.

I often think Adobe learned from the mistakes of the MPEG encoders, when it created the "Elements" series of Premiere editors. It provides a basic editor, MainConcept-based encoder and authoring workflow in a simple sub-$100 program. It's mostly good for a DV workflow, however, and controls can be limited for more advanced users. But still not as bad as the Procoder/CCE consumer encoder snafu.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
08-20-2010, 01:16 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
RE: bbartley9 / DVDSP4
Nothing in the video analysis is jumping out at me as being wrong or bad.
I'd almost rather see an analysis with Gspot on Windows. It may give more data on the container.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
08-20-2010, 01:18 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
I can do that this evening and post it. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
08-20-2010, 11:59 PM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
Attached are two outputs from Gspot. One works in DVDSP and the other does not (as labeled in filenames). I see that VIDEO_MPEG2_PPF is PPF in the non-working, and VIDEO_MPEG2_TFF is TFF in the working one. Both should be TFF I think, right? I'm not sure what PFF means. Also, the non-working shows a bitrate of half what it was set to in the ffmpegX settings (should be ~9000), and the frame count and video duration show up as twice as long (should be 4503 frames, 2:30 duration).

Thanks in advance for any help in looking these over. I am definitely in learning mode. BTW, the working file here was encoded using BitVice demo ($196) which seems to have pretty good output as well. I downloaded that today to try out.


Attached Files
File Type: txt wed422HQ_WORKS.txt (2.5 KB, 0 downloads)
File Type: txt wed422HQ_DOES_NOT_WORK.txt (2.5 KB, 1 downloads)
Reply With Quote
  #17  
08-21-2010, 12:15 AM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
I was never fond of BitVice. It crashed a lot.
ffmpegX seems to have made field-based encodes? That's odd.

I really, really want a Mac again. I could spend 10 minutes and have this figured out, instead of having to guess and go off memory.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
08-21-2010, 12:46 AM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
The interlace setting in ffmpegX was set to "Field". There is also a "Frame" setting (better?) and Not Interlaced. I can try Frame and see if it helps the situation.

I realized I could (and just did) attach screenshots of the ffmpegX settings, and I think these are all I have available to play with for the mpeg2enc encode. Maybe that'll be more clear as to what it's trying to generate. The bitrate calculator section under Video tab is a little confusing. I'm still not sure if it's a config setting or just informational, but I've been typing in 8000 for the rate for these tests, to compare.


Attached Images
File Type: png ffmpegX_settings1.png (73.4 KB, 2 downloads)
File Type: png ffmpegX_settings2.png (76.3 KB, 1 downloads)
File Type: png ffmpegX_settings3.png (71.8 KB, 1 downloads)
File Type: png ffmpegX_settings4.png (61.0 KB, 1 downloads)
File Type: png ffmpegX_settings5.png (69.8 KB, 1 downloads)
File Type: png ffmpegX_settingsSumm.png (61.6 KB, 1 downloads)
Reply With Quote
  #19  
08-21-2010, 12:52 AM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,338
Thanked 616 Times in 448 Posts
Try a short test clip with GOP headers and Closed GOP checked. See if DVDSP imports it then.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
08-21-2010, 01:49 AM
bbartley9 bbartley9 is offline
Free Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago suburbs
Posts: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Send a message via AIM to bbartley9
OK, success... I think it may have been the interlace setting of "Field" causing the problem, as I set it to "Frame" and now it muxes. I also then set GOP headers and closed GOP, but Closed GOP makes the titling choppy when it's scrolling vertically. So I turned that off for now. The test clip muxed in DVDSP to completion. Thanks a ton for stepping through this with me. As always, extremely helpful!
Reply With Quote
Reply




Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Download Google Books (as JPEG/PNG source files for printing to PDF) lordsmurf Computers 0 11-16-2010 06:56 AM
Camera, tripod, light source and mic for shooting videos? kpmedia Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting 0 09-03-2010 03:12 AM
Water scenes have noticeable artifacts on DVD? kpmedia Encode, Convert for discs 0 04-11-2010 04:03 AM
Artifacts (macroblocks) on HDTV set mlaviolette Capture, Record, Transfer 7 08-17-2004 04:30 AM
ATI 9000 Capture Artifacts inchga Capture, Record, Transfer 10 02-22-2004 01:59 AM

Thread Tools



 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:54 AM