Quantcast VCR Buying Guide (S-VHS, D-VHS, Professional) for restoring video - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
09-08-2009, 10:22 AM
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First the FAQ, then the list on VCRs...



Preface / VCR Buying Guide FAQ:

Before we get to the list of suggested VCRs, let's answer some common questions...



Q: Why use one of these VCRs, instead of one I already own?
A: By using a good VCR, you can get more quality out of those VHS tapes! The signal can be cleaned before forever committing what you see to adigital format (DVD/Blu-ray/etc). The VCRs listed below all have some degree of noise reduction, or otherwise play a tape cleanly.

Q: What's the difference between prosumer and professional?
A: "Prosumer" is consumer gear with pro features, and was often marketed to serious hobbyists or professionals with only basic pro-end needs. Prosumer equipment lacked BNC connections, genlock syncing, and other features that are not needed for video capturing. In the case of the JVC SR decks, "Professional" was just branding. The "professional" VCRs were just a continuation of the prosumer 7000s series.

Q: Why are some VCRs bold while others are not?
The most respected machines are in bold. However, that does not mean the other units are in any way bad. All of the VCRs list here are suggested.



Q: Why use a VCR with a TBC vs. one with no TBC?
A: Timebase correctors (TBCs) almost always exist in the pro VCRs suggested by the video community. In general, a TBC is a must for acquiring the best quality out of your tapes. If you will only own one or two good VCRs, then you need a model with a TBC.

Q: But why are VCRs without TBC listed here?
A: These no-TBC VCRs have impressive tape transport, which result in a very stable video signal. These are best used on for videos that already have clean video. Those VCRs are best for preservationists (zero cleanup with uncompressed capturing), and not your typical capturing needs.



Q: Are good VCRs available new in stores?
A: No. At this late date, you're not going to find any of these units new in stores, offline or online. The best VCRs are no longer made, thanks to VHS and S-VHS being dead formats. You'll have to shop for these on second-hand markets, such as eBay, Craigslist, Amazon, and our marketplace forum. Or try a video specialty shop, such as TGrantPhoto.

Q: How much do these VCRs cost?
A: In the 2010s, a quality unit fetches anywhere from $150 to $400, depending on the model and the condition. And before thinking these are expensive, realize the professional/prosumer decks originally commanded prices in the $400 to $2K range. These were not something that were found at low-end stores Best Buy or Walmart, but instead video/photo specialty stores like B&H.

Q: Shopping tips for testing used VCRs?
A: Read post#7 below for tips on how you, or a seller that you'd like to buy a VCR from, can test a S-VHS VCR and see how well it works. Plugging in a VCR and seeing the clock flash 12:00 is not a test. Pushing a tape in a VCR and seeing any kind of picture is not a test. Read these tips, so you don't buy a lemon!



Q: Where can I download instruction manual or service manual?
A: We've been archiving instruction/user/service manuals for many of these VCRs for years now, and continually try to add new ones. The downloads are all organized in this thread: Index of User Manuals and Service Manuals for VCRs (and other A/V gear)

Q: Do you think a VCR is missing from this list?
A: If you have, or come across, a similar model as mentioned on this list, do not simply assume it was an oversight. Nor should you assume that it is not suggested. Feel free to reply to this thread, or create a new thread, and ask us. While some models have been intentionally omitted from this list, others may not be.

Q: Find this page helpful? Then please support this site...
A: Guides like this take a lot of time to maintain. To support this site, become a Premium Member for only $20, and join a community of quality-seeking video professionals and enthusiasts. Or just drop us a quick thank-you donation of $2/$5/etc that we can use to pay for the site costs.



And now, the VCRs...

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Last edited by lordsmurf; 03-14-2015 at 05:21 AM. Reason: Moved VCRs to next post... -LS
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  #2  
09-09-2009, 05:22 AM
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NTSC

JVC S-VHS (NTSC)

There's two main reason to get a prosumer/professional JVC S-VHS VCR: the TBC, and the image "picture mode" filters (Auto/Norm/Soft/Sharp), which drastically improve the quality of VHS tapes. Most of the 9000-series decks also have the Dynamic Drum, which can be very helpful for tracking. Though not important, the 7000 series has 2mb TBC memory, and while the 9000 series has 4mb.

Note that the "professional" SR decks are simply a continuation of the prosumer 7000 series. The "Professional" badge is just branding/marketing, and does not make these better units. Several of the SR series machines were part of professional-quality "combo" decks that mixed in DV player/recorder and hard drives.
  • GoVideo SDV-650 - JVC HR-S9800U rebadge
  • JVC HR-S7500U
  • JVC HR-S7600U
  • JVC HR-S7800U
  • JVC HR-S7900U
  • JVC HR-S9500U
  • JVC HR-S9600U
  • JVC HR-S9800U
  • JVC HR-S9900U
  • JVC HR-S9911U
  • JVC SR-V10U / SR-V10
  • JVC SR-V101US / SR-V101U
  • JVC SR-VS30U
  • JVC HR-DVS3U - same as SR-VS30
  • JVC HM-HDS1
A complete list of all known JVC VCR model is here: VCR Buying Guide (S-VHS, D-VHS, Professional) for restoring video

Not suggested: 2x00, 3x00, 4x00, 5x00 and 6x00 series. None of these have TBCs. Anything older than HR-Sx500 lacks the features required, and is either an 1980s or early 1990s VCR. With few exceptions (see below), only the 7500+ and 9500+ decks should be used. NTSC has no 8x00 series.


Panasonic S-VHS (NTSC)


NTSC professional editing decks, with full-field (multi-line) TBCs instead of a standard line TBC. The Panasonic Picture Control slider on the 1970/1980 is a variable version of the JVC Picture Control selections (by default, it tends to already sharpen a little at the "normal" notch setting). While the picture quality is generally not as clean as JVC VCRs, its benefits include better EP/SLP tape playback.

  • Panasonic AG-5710 - same as 1980, without tuner
  • Panasonic AG-7650
  • Panasonic AG-1960P / AG-1960 - has no TBC
  • Panasonic AG-1970P / AG-1970
  • Panasonic AG-1980P / AG-1980 - a.k.a. Panasonic NV-FS 200 for PAL version

JVC D-VHS (NTSC)

These decks have a lot of the same features as the prosumer S-VHS line, but also has an added ability to cure VHS tearing, much like the Panasonic DMR-ES10 DVD recorder does on pass-through.
  • JVC HM-DH30000U
  • JVC HM-DH40000U
  • JVC SR-VD400U - same as HM-DH40000U
  • JVC HM-DH5U
  • JVC SR-VDA300U
  • Marantz MV-8300 - JVC HM-DH40000U rebadge

Mitsibishi D-VHS (NTSC)


These VCRs have all the TBC, DNR, Calibration, Picture Modes and 3D Y-C filters seen on the suggested JVC D-VHS models.
  • Mitsubishi HS-HD2000U D-VHS

JVC W-VHS (NTSC)


These decks have a lot of the same features as the prosumer S-VHS line. However, these units are almost impossible to fix (no parts available), and tend to be heavily used by the original studio/broadcast owners, so never buy an unknown-condition deck.
  • JVC SR-W5U / SR-W5
  • JVC SR-W7U / SR-W7

JVC S-VHS (NTSC) without TBC

These are prosumer decks that pre-date the TBC/DNR system. Although these decks are often considered inferior in some ways to latter-generation JVC VCRs, the playback is still quite excellent. These decks have known-excellent tape transports, which leads to stable playback that can, in some circumstances, with some tapes, outperform the later JVC TBC models, and provide a comparable EP/SLP performance to Panasonic transports.
  • JVC SR-S365U
  • JVC HR-S5000U
  • JVC HR-S5800U
  • JVC HR-S6800U
  • JVC HR-S6900U
  • JVC HR-S7100U
  • JVC HR-S9400U

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09-10-2009, 06:13 AM
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PAL

JVC S-VHS (PAL)

There's two main reason to get a prosumer/professional JVC S-VHS VCR: the TBC, and the image "picture mode" filters (Auto/Norm/Soft/Sharp), which drastically improve the quality of VHS tapes. Most of the 9000-series decks also have the Dynamic Drum, which can be very helpful for tracking. Though not important, the 7000 series has 2mb TBC memory, and while the 9000 series has 4mb.

Note that the "professional" SR decks are simply a continuation of the prosumer 7000 series. The "Professional" badge is just branding/marketing, and does not make these better units. Several of the SR series machines were part of professional-quality "combo" decks that mixed in DV player/recorder and hard drives.
  • JVC SR-S388E / SR-388EK
  • JVC HR-S7600EK
  • JVC HR-S7800EK
  • JVC HR-S7955EK
  • JVC HR-S7965EK
  • JVC HR-S8955EK
  • JVC HR-S8965EK
  • JVC HR-S9600EK/EU
  • JVC HR-S9700EK/EU - same as NTSC JVC HR-S9600U
  • JVC HR-S9850EK/EU - same as NTSC JVC HR-S9911U, final PAL prosumer model
  • JVC SR-V10E / SR-V10
  • Philips VR1000 - JVC rebadge
  • Philips VR1100 - JVC rebadge
  • Philips VR1600 - JVC rebadge
A complete list of all known JVC VCR model is here: VCR Buying Guide (S-VHS, D-VHS, Professional) for restoring video

Not suggested: HR-S7500, HR-S9500, as the models lack . Same for the 2x00, 3x00, 4x00, 5x00 and 6x00 series; same reasons as NTSC models.


Panasonic S-VHS (PAL)


PAL professional editing decks, with full-field (multi-line) TBCs instead of a standard line TBC. The Panasonic Picture Control slider is a variable version of the JVC Picture Control selections (by default, it tends to already sharpen a little at the "normal" notch setting). While the picture quality is generally not as clean as JVC VCRs, its benefits include better EP/SLP tape playback.
  • Blaupunkt RTV-950 - Panasonic NV-FS200 rebadge, comparable to NTSC Panasonic AG-1980P
  • Blaupunkt RTV-965 - Panasonic NV-HS1000 rebadge, comparable to NTSC Panasonic AG-1980P
  • Blaupunkt RTV-966 - Panasonic NV-HS1000 rebadge, comparable to NTSC Panasonic AG-1980P
  • Metz S-VHS VC62 - Panasonic NV-HS 950 rebadge
  • Panasonic NV-FS 200 - comparable to NTSC Panasonic AG-1980P
  • Panasonic NV-HS 1000 - comparable to NTSC Panasonic AG-1980P
  • Panasonic NV-HS 950
  • Panasonic NV-HS 860
  • Panasonic NV-HS 930
  • Panasonic NV-HS 960
  • Panasonic NV-SV 121

JVC D-VHS (PAL)

These decks have a lot of the same features as the prosumer S-VHS line, but also has an added ability to cure VHS tearing, much like the Panasonic DMR-ES10 DVD recorder does on pass-through.
  • JVC HM-DR10000U

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09-10-2009, 06:13 AM
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SECAM

Panasonic Multi-Format (PAL/NTSC/SECAM)


These so-called "professional" VCRs were simply consumer-grade VHS VCRs capable of playing all tape formats: PAL, SECAM and NTSC. This includies the obscure variants like PAL-M and SECAM-L. The specific conversions available varied per units.

In terms of video quality, you're better off using a PAL S-VHS VCR to play a PAL tape, and NTSC S-VHS VCR to play NTSC tapes; only use these for the exotic tape formats such as PAL SECAM. PAL>NTSC conversion is also better performed with complex software methods, or studio-grade conversion hardware from Snell & Willcox. Outside of a simple blurring function, these VCRs have no special filters for improving quality.
  • Aiwa WHVMX100- Panasonic AG-Wx rebadge
  • Panasonic AG-W1
  • Panasonic AG-W2 - no SECAM-L
  • Panasonic AG-W3
  • Samsung SVW-5000W - Panasonic AG-W2 rebadge
  • Samsung SVW-7000W - Panasonic AG-W3 rebadge


I hope this helps you with high quality conversion work.

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  #5  
02-20-2010, 01:18 PM
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Here's the user manual and spec sheet for the JVC SR-S388E PAL S-VHS VCR with timebase corrector, DNR and other filters.


Attached Files
File Type: pdf JVC-SR-S388E-Instruction-Manual.pdf (1.95 MB, 119 downloads)
File Type: pdf JVC-SR-S388E-Spec-Sheet.pdf (209.6 KB, 71 downloads)

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  #6  
04-13-2010, 06:01 PM
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A number of the Panasonic AG series S-VHS VCR manuals can be downloaded from http://service.us.panasonic.com/oper....aspx?model=AG

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07-15-2010, 07:18 AM
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Tips for Testing Out a Used VCR

Physical Inspection:
First, open it up. Look at it. Are the heads smooth and clean? No visible damage? Are all the internals clean and in good shape? Nothing rotted (dry rot included), broken, brittle, sludgy, etc?

Play SP Mode Tapes:
Second, play some SP mode tapes. Preferably something that can be "eaten," like a commercial VHS release. I keep old copies of tapes like Liar Liar, Batman Returns and TMNT -- something that is both easy to replace, and already exists in better quality on DVD. Does the tape play perfectly?

Play LP, EP, SLP mode tapes:
Third, try an EP mode tape. Again, preferably a commercial release. Find one of those cheapo budget releases, like public domain cartoons. I would hesitate to use personal recordings, unless it's (again) something easy to replace. I have recordings of the Dukes of Hazzard from about 1998 on VHS. I've long since bought the DVDs, don't need the tapes. These are not original recordings, so no value to commercials either. See if those tapes play rather clear and perfect. No tracking problems. (Or minimal problems, depending on crappiness of the tape.)

Test the Switches:
Next, test the switches. For example, on a Panasonic AG-1980P:
  • Does the sharpen slider actually blur/sharpen?
  • Does the "audio out" button put it to mono?
  • Does the B&W slider dump the chroma (color)?
  • Detail/nor/edit?
  • TBC works?
Inputs and Outputs:
Finally, tests the inputs and outputs. Can you get signals in and out of the deck?

Remote Notes:
For a JVC model, you really need the remote. Although many models have menus that can be accessed from the front of the unit, some do not. Watch for this. The one thing NOT on a Panasonic deck itself is the counter reset. I could never do advanced editing projects, with all their timecodes, without the ability to reset the timer easily. For this, you'll need the remote. Or possibly a programmable remote.

Originally posted at: http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/showthread.php/advice-preserve-svhs-2254.html in response to a question.

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  #8  
12-26-2010, 07:23 AM
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Tip for testing SVHS deck: Record/Playback tape in SVHS mode. Dropouts are more evident in SVHS playback than in normal VHS playback. This is based on my own experiences with worn/dirty heads on SVHS decks, YMMV. Good test pattern for dropouts is quick transition from white(preferably maximum white) to black and vice versa.

edit: I have a deck which has horrible dropouts with SVHS but works great on VHS. From this it could be deduced that if SVHS playback is ok, there's a long life ahead in VHS mode. Of course this needs more testing than one unit but this is not possible at the moment for me.
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01-01-2011, 08:08 PM
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Tip: Do you have a JVC and the S-Video in doesn't seem to work? My machine HR-S5910U has an option available by menu only to allow Svideo input in the rear input. Without a remote, you can't access this option.
There's a way to deal with not having the original remote. The IR codes are available in Pronto format. This can be converted to URC format. URC is a company which makes a large variety of programmable remotes. In fact, my cable settop box came with one. In the battery compartment are some exposed pins. With a bit of work, you can download the new codes. I cut apart an old printer cable for this to make the cable.
Another way is to convert the codes into a wav file and play back the sound through an IR transistor. This is a cheap way to make an IR extender. You can then "Learn" the code into a universal remote.
I can make a guide for this if someone is *really* interested.
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  #10  
02-11-2011, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post
Tip: Do you have a JVC and the S-Video in doesn't seem to work? My machine HR-S5910U has an option available by menu only to allow Svideo input in the rear input. Without a remote, you can't access this option.
This is one of the downsides of the cheaper VCRs. As equipment gets pricier, you'll find that more and more controls are physically placed onto the unit, with dedicated buttons, knobs, levers, switches and sliders. The 7600+ and 9600+ JVC S-VHS decks, for example, have full options available with either dedicated buttons or by using the front menu button and navigation/OK buttons. In fact, my remotes stay in a drawer most of the time, as I prefer to use deck controls.

Quote:
There's a way to deal with not having the original remote. The IR codes are available in Pronto format. This can be converted to URC format. URC is a company which makes a large variety of programmable remotes. In fact, my cable settop box came with one. In the battery compartment are some exposed pins. With a bit of work, you can download the new codes. I cut apart an old printer cable for this to make the cable. Another way is to convert the codes into a wav file and play back the sound through an IR transistor. This is a cheap way to make an IR extender. You can then "Learn" the code into a universal remote.
Interesting.

Quote:
I can make a guide for this if someone is *really* interested.
Please do. Just make a new post in this forum. I know questions like this have come up in the past, and will surely come up again. Maybe next time, we'll finally have a good answer, aside from "look on eBay for a replacement". A homemade DIY approach is always appreciated.

Add this when you get a chance!

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02-13-2011, 12:21 PM
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[Notes]

I'd like to see these VCRs models either added to, or specifically excluded from, the above list. What we'll need, however, is the reviews of owners -- those who have a decent grasp of VCR tech, and can compare performance between several models.

List of models...
  • Panasonic NV-FS90 EG PAL S-VHS VCR
  • Panasonic NV-HS860 PAL S-VHS VCR
  • Panasonic NV-HS930 PAL S-VHS VCR
  • Panasonic NV-HS960 PAL S-VHS VCR
  • Panasonic NV-HS1000 PAL S-VHS VCR
  • Panasonic NV-SJ210 PAL VHS VCR (no TBC, not SVHS)
  • Toshiba SV-771C (TBC? no TBC?)

Will update this list as I notice more models discussed online, which do not appear in our current list.

If you can provide some insight or input onto any of the models of VCRs discussed anywhere on this page, or even to discuss some new models NOT mentioned here, please do so!

Thanks.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

And then this Panasonic VCR information may good to integrate into either the VCR recommendations list, or the associated Service Manuals / User Manuals threads, as this list (I believe) compares transports and/or internals:

Panasonic S-VHS PAL G2 decks:
  • Panasonic NV-FS100
  • Panasonic NV-FS100B
  • Panasonic NV-FS1B
  • Panasonic NV-FS200
  • Panasonic NV-FS88
  • Panasonic NV-FS90
  • Panasonic NV-FS90B
  • Panasonic NV-FS95
Panasonic S-VHS PAL K decks / K-Mech:
  • Panasonic NV-HD100B/EB
  • Panasonic NV-HD610, NV-HD605
  • Panasonic NV-HD620
  • Panasonic NV-HD625
  • Panasonic NV-HD630 NV-HD628
  • Panasonic NV-HD650
  • Panasonic NV-HD650
  • Panasonic NV-HD700
  • Panasonic NV-HD90
  • Panasonic NV-HD90B
  • Panasonic NV-HS1000B/EC
  • Panasonic NV-HS800B/EC
  • Panasonic NV-HS900
  • Panasonic NV-HD660 K-MECH
  • Panasonic NV-HS1000 K-MECH
  • Panasonic NV-HS800 K-MECH
  • Panasonic NV-HS900 K-MECH
Panasonic S-VHS PAL Z-decks:
  • Panasonic NV-HD680 Z deck
  • Panasonic NV-HS850EG/B/EC Z deck
Listed, but unmarked on source list:
  • Panasonic NV-HS950
  • Panasonic NV-HS200
... and it would be interesting to see how these compare to the ones already found on the "suggested models" list at the top of this page. I will say this: It's going to be very hard to displace the FS-NV200 (PAL AG-1980P) as the best Panasonic model. And then displacing JVC is a bit of challenge, too, as JVC VCRs give cleaner quality video output.

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02-17-2011, 07:22 PM
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Adding to the list. It looks like the Marantz MV-8300 DVHS VCR is a clone of the JVC DH-40000U. I have not been able to find a manual for the unit to confirm this though. Some reviews state its based on the JVC chassis with some Marantz sourced electronics.
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  #13  
02-21-2011, 02:13 AM
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Link Panasonic K machine
http://rochired.altervista.org/pg002.html

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03-16-2011, 03:58 PM
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Adding to this list, how about the JVC HR-S6900U Super VHS VCR from 1993 It doesn't have a built in TBC, but the picture quality and sound are even better than the JVC HM-DH30000U. Also, what about the JVC HR-S9400U Super VHS VCR from 1997? The unit doesn't have a TBC but it has a function that cleans up EP tapes. Also, it has the dynamic drum. I don't know about you guys, but I find that using the later made machines like the JVC HM DH30000U and the JVC SR-V101US don't give me good quality on some tapes unlike the older machines. Also, I own 2 JVC HM DT100U's, and the quality of Super VHS looks more grainy compared to those older machines

Also, could a external TBC do better than an internal TBC? I ask this because I have owned both a Panasonic AG 1970 and a JVC SR V101US, and I've found that on some tapes, while having the TBC active, it causes the image to shake.
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03-17-2011, 02:09 AM
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You make some excellent points, and I've slightly re-structured the list in the first post, to reflect your suggestions. Indeed, there are several models of VCR that, even without TBCs, are known to perform quite well due to their transport system. The older JVCs are a consistent name-maker in that area. And the models you mention are amongst those.

Note this new section: JVC S-VHS (NTSC) without TBC. Some models were moved out of the with-TBC list.

To address your other observations and issues...

Quote:
JVC HR-S6900U Super VHS VCR from 1993 It doesn't have a built in TBC, but the picture quality and sound are even better than the JVC HM-DH30000U
This is commonly mentioned amongst peers, online and real-world, for both the 6800 and 6900 series machines. I don't (yet) have the honor of owning one, but it's on the shopping list, should I see one in good condition and for a fair price.

Your experience is very typical, for a deck in good condition, without heavy wear, and when used to play back a certain kind of tape (reference to its condition, and need for restoration/filtering).

Quote:
Also, what about the JVC HR-S9400U Super VHS VCR from 1997? The unit doesn't have a TBC but it has a function that cleans up EP tapes. Also, it has the dynamic drum.
Similar comments are made about the HR-S9500U. I've seen these in action, and while better than some lower end VCRs, they're maybe not quite as good as the 6800-6900 units. And then the 9600 was a real game changer.

Quote:
I don't know about you guys, but I find that using the later made machines like the JVC HM DH30000U and the JVC SR-V101US don't give me good quality on some tapes unlike the older machines.
It's very true that the quality of VCRs after the 9800 and 7800 tanked a little bit. The 7900/SR-V10/SR-V101 and 9900/9911 weren't really bad, but the x600 and x800 decks were just better machines. My person 9800 has been in service for 10 years now, performingly flawlessly. I do service it every other year, either at a shop or with self-maintenance.

Quote:
Also, could a external TBC do better than an internal TBC?
No. An external TBC has a different intended function from the internal TBC.
Read this: What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes

Quote:
I ask this because I have owned both a Panasonic AG 1970 and a JVC SR V101US, and I've found that on some tapes, while having the TBC active, it causes the image to shake.
That's a tape signal issue, in most cases. Sometimes it's a sign of a defective VCR, but don't let me scare you -- that's not common. It's almost always a tape flaw. This is a known issue.

Read this: Basic Playback Hardware (to Convert Tape to Digital)
That's another guide I authored years and years ago.

Thanks much for your helpful post.

And I hope my response has clarified some of your observations, concerns and issues.

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03-17-2011, 11:51 AM
Jpass992 Jpass992 is offline
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Thank you very much for adding both the JVC HR S6900U and the JVC HR S9400U to the list. I truly appreciate it. I do have a couple of questions though. Since the quality of these machines were so good, I would like to use them in converting tapes over to DVD. However, since my original machines died along time ago, I had spent time trying to hunt them down off of ebay. Since I am trying to dub people's tapes over to DVD, would it be wise to have them serviced and get new upper drums and audio heads? Afterall, one wouldn't know how much play time or record time those drums have had.

I had read your post on TBCs, and I would like to ask you which do you prefer to use? External TBC's or TBC's that are built into the VCR? The reason why I ask this is because I am trying to open up a business and since I will be taking many tapes whose conditions will probably range from good to bad. For my set up, I would like to take one of those Super VHS VCRs that I had mentioned and send it through one of the TBCs, that you had mentioned, and then from there send it to be JVC HM DT100U, where I would take the HDMI out and plug it into my Hauppauge Colossus HD PVR card. I figured that this might be the best set up, since I would like to try to upgrade the signal to at least 480p.

Also, that Panasonic AG 1970 unit was bought second hand off of ebay, and I had to throw it out after the second day I had used the machine as the heads were shot and showing red and blue all over the screen. I did some research and had contributed this to head wear so I just decided to toss the machine since the price of a new drum would have been so expensive. The JVC SR V101US I still have, it even has the original box with it. However, the machine has developed an alignment problem and won't playback the hi-fi audio. I've contemplated getting that machine repaired as well since it has the TBC, however, the transport mechanism on that machine is so flimsy.

Lastly, what do you think of the JVC HR S7000U? That was my father's first Super VHS VCR back in 1987, however I believe that it had a problem with the eject mechanism and the machine had some buttons that had broken off of the flip down panel. I checked on ued.net and I can still get the panel if I wanted to for $46.19. Since my father had recorded on that machine from 1987 to about 1994, I thought that it might be worth getting repaired since that machine would track the tapes recorded on it from '87 to '94 the best.
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03-19-2011, 05:53 PM
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Thanks for the VCR Buying Guide.

After some research I came to the conclusion that Panasonic NV-HS1000 would be a great machine for me.
But I got a bit confused when finding different sub-versions.

Does anyone know what these titles means?

NV-HS1000B
NV-HS1000BYP
NV-HS1000EC
NV-HS1000ECP
NV-HS1000EG
NV-HS1000EGC

I got some help with the version history from "Panasonic NV-HS1000EGC. NV-HS1000BYP. NV-HS1000ECP (Service Manual. Simplified).pdf"

Chapter 1-1
"The following charts show the difference between the basic model NV-HS1000EG and the new model NV-HS1000EGC."

Chapter 1-2
"The following charts show the difference between the basic model NV-HS1000B and the new model NV-HS100BYP."

Chapter 1-3
"The following charts show the difference between the basic model NV-HS1000EC and the new model NV-HS1000ECP."


Would any of those sub-versions make any difference for digitalizing old VHS-cassettes?
Are they references to different frequencies (for different countries / regions) for the channel tuner?
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05-10-2011, 01:16 PM
Tasuke Tasuke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpass992 View Post
what do you think of the JVC HR S7000U? That was my father's first Super VHS VCR back in 1987, however I believe that it had a problem with the eject mechanism and the machine had some buttons that had broken off of the flip down panel. I checked on ued.net and I can still get the panel if I wanted to for $46.19. Since my father had recorded on that machine from 1987 to about 1994, I thought that it might be worth getting repaired since that machine would track the tapes recorded on it from '87 to '94 the best.
it is very similar to, and the direct forerunner of the HR-S8000U; i think you should get the 7000U serviced, and get yourself an 8000U as well. you will then have BOTH of JVCs first two format-introducing flagship S-VHS VCRs, as well as two of the very best VCRs of all time, in terms of build quality and overall cosmetics.

they are fantastic performers, too. perhaps not as good for archival use as the DNR and TBC laden 1990's models recommended at the top of this thread, but nonetheless smashingly good VCRs in their own right, and highly recommended for average use, with looks to die for and build quality second to none...


Attached Images
File Type: jpg HR-S7000U.jpg (23.8 KB, 95 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000U52.jpg (19.4 KB, 84 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000U22.jpg (70.9 KB, 73 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000UJOHN5-4-111.jpg (45.2 KB, 65 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000UJOHN5-4-112.jpg (49.4 KB, 65 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000U7.jpg (84.9 KB, 68 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000U19.jpg (91.8 KB, 68 downloads)
File Type: jpg HR-S8000U9.jpg (55.9 KB, 67 downloads)

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05-24-2011, 05:33 PM
NJRoadfan NJRoadfan is offline
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Just a quick addition. It appears that JVC cheaped out the 9911 over the 9900. The 9911 looses the Dynamic Drum/Pro Slow system in exchange for a pretty flip down door that usually breaks off.
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06-10-2011, 01:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJRoadfan View Post
Just a quick addition. It appears that JVC cheaped out the 9911 over the 9900. The 9911 looses the Dynamic Drum/Pro Slow system in exchange for a pretty flip down door that usually breaks off.
The HR-S9911 is more like the cheap low-end HR-S2901 than it is the HR-S9800U that came before it. However, it does still act quite decently, with a line TBC, and is the reason why it made the list. I would not pay more for it over an earlier model, unless it's new and unused (i.e., no head wear! no wear at all!). But that's really about it.

The SR-V101U is in the same situation -- cheaped out a bit.

The HR-S9911U, SR-V101US and HR-S2901U were the final models of VCR only made by JVC in the S-VHS lines.

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