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rocko 07-10-2015 03:59 PM

Poor-man's monitor calibration techniques?
 
I found out that my 2 New ViewSonic VP2365 monitors have sRGB as a color option. I know that that this is the easy way out of calibration, but I currently have no other ($$$) choice? can I use this as a starting point to view semi-accurate colors for now?

sanlyn 07-10-2015 06:10 PM

RGB should be the default profile. You can modify what you see by using the monitor's image controls. Basically, most monitors out of the box are 200% too bright for graphics work. Setting contrast and brightness down by about 20% is a decent start. The default color temperature for video and graphics work is 6500K -- that usually means a general setting of "warm" or "movie" on some monitors, others have a 6500K setting. If your monitor has separate controls for red, green, and , blue, it's impossible to adjust them accurately by eye. You should also install the basic monitor driver that identifies your monitor precisely in the Windows desktop Properties.

Some basic manual moniytor test patches are here: http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/.

Check the setup CD that came with your monitors. Many setup discs have a monitor calibration app of some kind. You might be able to find one to download on the OEM's website. The best of them that I've seen are for HP's monitors, the worst is from Samsung. Those download apps usually check your system to see if you're using the brand's product, so don't just download anybody's app if you find one. Windows 7 has a display color adjustment wizard in the desktop setup options, usually OK for a basic contrast/brightness adjustment, a little iffy for color balance -- but set your monitor's basic controls first before using it. Right click on the desktop, then click "Properties". I don't recall exactly where the wizard is, but not difficult to find. Use your monitor's built-in controls for the adjustments -- don't use your graphic card's settings, or you'll get mixed up about which adjustment profile is doing what.

Adjust monitors in subdued light. Don't try to work on video by sitting in bright light, or by having lamps placed directly behind you and reflected off the monitor. Don't work next to windows open to daylight. But don't wok in complete darkness, either -- your eyes will think the monitor is too bright and will shut down. Besides, you won't be able to see your keyboard, LOL!

dpalomaki 07-11-2015 08:39 AM

The lagom.nl link provides some interesting stuff. Well worth visiting!

If you are serious about calibrating your video card-monitor combination, keep an eye open for specials on moderate cost calibration gear; e.g., Data Color's Spyder or X-rite's ColorMunki. Every now and then B&H has them on special.

Goldwingfahrer 07-11-2015 11:14 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

If your monitor has separate controls for red, green, and , blue, it's impossible to adjust them accurately by eye.
But works very well, as Step 1, with Spyder Elite Pro 3

A lot of time and patience.

Tolerance is at 0.05 Dab
maximum I have reached is, see Screen

Do not forget then to save the whole thing off,[.icm]

rocko 07-11-2015 11:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sanlyn (Post 38791)
RGB should be the default profile. You can modify what you see by using the monitor's image controls. Basically, most monitors out of the box are 200% too bright for graphics work. Setting contrast and brightness down by about 20% is a decent start. The default color temperature for video and graphics work is 6500K -- that usually means a general setting of "warm" or "movie" on some monitors, others have a 6500K setting. If your monitor has separate controls for red, green, and , blue, it's impossible to adjust them accurately by eye. You should also install the basic monitor driver that identifies your monitor precisely in the Windows desktop Properties.

Some basic manual moniytor test patches are here: http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/.

Check the setup CD that came with your monitors. Many setup discs have a monitor calibration app of some kind. You might be able to find one to download on the OEM's website. The best of them that I've seen are for HP's monitors, the worst is from Samsung. Those download apps usually check your system to see if you're using the brand's product, so don't just download anybody's app if you find one. Windows 7 has a display color adjustment wizard in the desktop setup options, usually OK for a basic contrast/brightness adjustment, a little iffy for color balance -- but set your monitor's basic controls first before using it. Right click on the desktop, then click "Properties". I don't recall exactly where the wizard is, but not difficult to find. Use your monitor's built-in controls for the adjustments -- don't use your graphic card's settings, or you'll get mixed up about which adjustment profile is doing what.

Adjust monitors in subdued light. Don't try to work on video by sitting in bright light, or by having lamps placed directly behind you and reflected off the monitor. Don't work next to windows open to daylight. But don't wok in complete darkness, either -- your eyes will think the monitor is too bright and will shut down. Besides, you won't be able to see your keyboard, LOL!

Yes, my Viewsonics have "Color Adjust" menu, with sRGB/9300/7500/6500/and 5000K/User Color as choices. Came with install CD and Installed drivers and .inf(?) file..I thought there was calibration included,but could not find anything on CD or thier site..but they ARE ID'd in windows And my Nvidia Card.
And yes in Win 7: Right click on Desktop>Personalize>Display>Calibrate Color for Wizard, Instructions say to select sRGB if monitor has that option. And thanks for info about not using Graphics Card Settings!..I was confused about that! Nvidia control panel has 2 separate places (Desktop color,and also Video playback) to choose option to "Use applications or Nvidia to control color", I will set to Use Applications.... And light is pretty low in room most all day, In fact, I Have to turn ON lights to see my keyboard in here! (exept for morning):salute:

lordsmurf 07-12-2015 05:45 PM

The VP2365 is already really, really accurate. That's one reason it's suggested. It's not overly bright, nor tinted.

For photo, the best way to calibrate on the cheap is to print a color photograph (on a good printer!), and then match the monitor to the output. But it must be a good printer ($$$), otherwise you're just matching it to the printers offset.

For video, use a color matching tool. See http://www.digitalfaq.com/forum/prem...m-members.html

Spyder is best for photo, but not cheap.

I do all methods, and find the ideal in-between. Pictures send to AdoramaPix.com come out perfectly matched, as does all the video work.

rocko 07-14-2015 03:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lordsmurf (Post 38832)
The VP2365 is already really, really accurate. That's one reason it's suggested. It's not overly bright, nor tinted.

Set to sRGB or 6500k?...Also downloaded the AVIA calib file from prem member section, and burned with IMGBurn, But the sound/narration fades in and out a bit, I may have burned too fast,or something else? may have to try that again at slower burn speed.


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