Quantcast Good Panasonic VCR for PAL VHS-C tapes? - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
08-24-2019, 09:30 PM
mohammad84 mohammad84 is offline
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Since everyone in the forum recommended to avoid using JVCs to play VHS-C tapes, I am looking for a good Panasonic VCR to capture my VHS-C tapes. (Except a couple LP, they are all SP)

Is the Panasonic NV-FS200 a good VCR for PAL VHS-C tapes?
Or the newer models like NV-HS950 are better due to the 3DNR feature?
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  #2  
09-11-2019, 06:42 PM
ofesad ofesad is offline
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There are some mix opinions regarding VHS-C tapes. Somes don't like to use the VHS-C to VHS adapter. Others do. Currently I do a bit of both.

Just a couple of weeks ago I bought a JVC camcoder (GR-SXM747UM) wich was a pretty good model with built in TBC.
Here in Argentina the adopted norm is PAL-N but there are a lot of mix tapes formats. In my personal case I have a old JVC vhs-c camcorder wich is NTSC, but my PAL decks are Panasonics AG4700 (a very well recommended PAL Deck too along with the HS1000).

So for the PAL VHS-C I use the adapter and play'em in the AG4700s while the NTSC VHS-C tapes I use the new JVC Camcoder wich has S-video output plus the built-in TBC (a built-in TBC it's not always recommended but in this particular case it does a pretty good job stabilizing the picture).

The FS series of panasonic is superb but expensive and also has a well known problem with the surface mounted capacitors that most likely will go bad and will have to recap the entire deck (sometimes it's easier than try to find wich cap did go bad).

The AG4700 and HS1000 has common (radial) electrolitics caps so it's easier to work with it when repairing.

I don't know where you are from, but any JVC SVHS Deck series models 7000 or higher are worth getting.

Any Noise reduction feature is welcome but be sure (check the manuals) that it could be turned on/off. When capturing sometimes it's better to do a raw capture and then aplly filters (with avisynth / virtualdub) for cleaning the noise.

For example the AG4700 has a Picture control (sharpness) and a AI Switch. When the AI switch it's ONthe picture control it's disabled. Then the AI feature takes over and Sharpens/Soften the image according to a it's built in TBC and image-processor-who-no-one-knows-how-it-works (magic). It's best to leave it off.
Also the built-in TBC aint very good, at least compared to JVC's built-in TBCs.

I know there a lot of people here with more experience than I, but my personal advice: try to find good deals for prosumer grade equipment. SVHS are always on demmand. (I am still hunting for a JVC). It could take some time to get all the proper equipment if you don't wanna spent much money.


Ofesad
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  #3  
09-11-2019, 07:59 PM
hodgey hodgey is offline
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I can't speak for other camcorders, but I've used the JVC GR-SX22 S-VHS camcorder little. It has a built-in TBC like the slighly newer model ofesad has. My JVC GR-FXM41 (not SVHS) does too, seems some 2000s JVC and Panasonic camcorders do. I have barely even tested the latter one though.

The luma part of the image on the JVC GR-SX22 is actually pretty decent, but the chroma is a bit smeared compared to my VCRs, and I seem to remember it being a bit offset as well. The TBC is a bit hit and miss, it works well most of the time to stabilize the image, though it is a bit like the Sony Hi8 cameras in that it bluescreens if the image is too bad. I have found it useful on a few tapes where vertical jitter was an issue, and the camcorder worked better than using a VCR.

I've never had any tape eating issues with using VHSC tapes in JVC/Philips decks as I've heard stories of here, though the TBC in these seem a bit sensitive to vertical jitter on VHSC tapes (more so on our Philips VR1100 than my JVC HR-S8500). I've I tend to resort to the TBC in my Sony DVD recorder instead, or the Panasonic NV-HS1000 if the tape is in very good condition.

Both the FS200 and the 950 should be good though, I would say it's more about what you can find in good condition.

Quote:
I don't know where you are from, but any JVC SVHS Deck series models 7000 or higher are worth getting.
Mainly from 7600 and newer, 7500 and older doesn't feature a TBC. (For the x500 PAL lineup only the 8500 and 9500 has TBC, older lineups don't at all.)
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  #4  
09-11-2019, 08:23 PM
ofesad ofesad is offline
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Here I upload a personal family capture using the GR-SXM747UM.
Side-to-side comparision with the built-in TBC ON and OFF.

For what it it's, it really does a really good job.

I personally would avoid Panasonic camcorders, at least here in Argentina, JVC was king on that matter and I haven't seen a decent Panasonic camcoders compared to JVC's.
Weirdly enough, Panasonic vhs decks are more common than JVC's.

Also try to find a vhs tape cleaner or rewinder. It helps a lot with "hard" tapes and cleaning.
A personal advice: do not rewind tapes in the decks or camcorders, that's the rewinder for.
Most VHS keep the tape against the head (some old Panasonics had a nice feature that retracted the tape from the head to rewind/ff) so rew or ff will cause more wear on the head. Keep in mind that these equipment are around 20 years old, so getting new parts it's rare and expensive, so you wanna take good care of it.

Like hodgey say'd, sometimes it's better to have the camcoders. But VHS deck should work ok. Also keeping the VHS-C > VHS adapter in good condition helps a lot.

Ofesad


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  #5  
09-14-2019, 07:09 PM
mohammad84 mohammad84 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ofesad View Post
I don't know where you are from, but any JVC SVHS Deck series models 7000 or higher are worth getting.

Ofesad
I am from Middle East. I bought a JVC HR-S9600EU recently, but I am afraid to play VHS-Cs on it, as I read past posts about JVCs eating VHS-Cs. Therefore, I am looking for a professional Panasonic deck to capture my VHS-C tapes.
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  #6  
09-15-2019, 12:14 PM
josem84 josem84 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammad84 View Post
I am from Middle East. I bought a JVC HR-S9600EU recently, but I am afraid to play VHS-Cs on it, as I read past posts about JVCs eating VHS-Cs. Therefore, I am looking for a professional Panasonic deck to capture my VHS-C tapes.
That's a waste of money... money that you can spend on something else. What you're saying about JVC's eating VHSc tapes is pure nonsense. As long as your VCR is in good working condition and well lubricated, you shouldn't have any problem. Make sure you use a good quality VHSc adapter. VCRs eating tapes are mostly due to dirty mode switches & dried up gears. Just for your information... I also have a JVC HR-S9600 and I use my Hama VHSc adapter (fully manual) regularly with it without any problems.

Last edited by josem84; 09-15-2019 at 12:56 PM.
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  #7  
09-15-2019, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josem84 View Post
What you're saying about JVC's eating VHSc tapes is pure nonsense.
My decades of experience with the format disagrees.

Quote:
As long as your VCR is in good working condition and well lubricated, you shouldn't have any problem.
VCRs eating tapes are mostly due to dirty mode switches & dried up gears.
That's not it whatsoever. The problem is the transports themselves. Most JVCs are designed to be a bit rougher with tapes, where the Panasonics are more solid. (Don't confused "solid" with better, especially when it comes to image quality. Just the Panasonics work better than JVCs for the flimsier VHS-C and S-VHS-C formats.)

Quote:
I also have a JVC HR-S9600 and I use my Hama VHSc adapter (fully manual) regularly with it without any problems.
Then consider yourself lucky. At least so far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammad84 View Post
I am from Middle East. I bought a JVC HR-S9600EU recently, but I am afraid to play VHS-Cs on it, as I read past posts about JVCs eating VHS-Cs. Therefore, I am looking for a professional Panasonic deck to capture my VHS-C tapes.
Do you still have the tape that was already converted for you? If so, test with it.

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  #8  
09-15-2019, 02:40 PM
josem84 josem84 is offline
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Quote:
Then consider yourself lucky. At least so far.
I've had several JVCs in my collection and I've never had any problems. I still think the actual condition of the VCR + the VHSc adaptor used are the key factors here.

Quote:
That's not it whatsoever. The problem is the transports themselves. Most JVCs are designed to be a bit rougher with tapes, where the Panasonics are more solid. (Don't confused "solid" with better, especially when it comes to image quality. Just the Panasonics work better than JVCs for the flimsier VHS-C and S-VHS-C formats.)
Could you please elaborate on this? I don't think the transport mechanism has anything to do with what I was saying.
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  #9  
09-15-2019, 05:32 PM
latreche34 latreche34 is offline
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I've used cassette adapters on JVC VCR's never had once the VCR eat the tape, But if someone is doing this for a living capturing tapes and had problems with JVC VCR's I would believe it but I have to know how much the frequency of use of JVC VCR's vs other brands, If 90% of the time capturing with JVC and 10% with other brands I would say it is not a fair statement.
To the OP, chances of inserting that tape adapter in your VCR and the tape gets eaten in the first try is slim, So I would try the least important tape first and go from there, If the incident happens more than once it's a good reason to buy a camcorder.
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  #10  
09-15-2019, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josem84 View Post
Could you please elaborate on this? I don't think the transport mechanism has anything to do with what I was saying.
It has everything to do with it. It's the mechanics of the VCR, no just the ingest/eject process, but the way to FF/REW, tensions and slack allowed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by latreche34 View Post
it's a good reason to buy a camcorder.
Not really. Camcorders are generally worse than the JVC S-VHS decks on playback.

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  #11  
09-16-2019, 07:08 AM
josem84 josem84 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
It has everything to do with it. It's the mechanics of the VCR, no just the ingest/eject process, but the way to FF/REW, tensions and slack allowed.
What I was saying was that there's no reason for a perfectly working machine (Panasonic or JVC, I don't care) to eat up a tape. I listed you the most common causes for this to happen. Obviously if you're using a shitty adapter or a trashed VHSc tape you will have problems.

I asked you about this statement...

Quote:
Most JVCs are designed to be a bit rougher with tapes, where the Panasonics are more solid.
... because I sincerely don't know what you're referring to with this.

Again, If I was the OP, I would spend that money on something else, like a TBC for example. You're right about opting for a S-VHS player for transferring VHSc tapes instead of using a camcorder. But buying a second S-VHS with the sole purpose of transferring VHSc tapes is NONSENSE. Just my humble opinion.
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