Quantcast Avisynth: Convert 23.976 to 25 fps? - digitalFAQ.com Forums [Archives]
  #1  
10-20-2004, 10:10 AM
kev23m kev23m is offline
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I have a source which is Progressive 29.97 , have saved d2v with forced film.

I wanna change this to Pal to make a 2 in 1 dvd as the other movie i have is encoded and ready in pal system.

What would be the best way to changefps to 25 and will i have to redo audio as i plan to use the original 5.1 ac3 file.

Thanks
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  #2  
10-20-2004, 10:28 AM
Dialhot Dialhot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev23m
I have a source which is Progressive 29.97 , have saved d2v with forced film.
If it is progressive 29.97, then the source in in VIDEO mode, not FILM mode. So you mustn't force DVD2AVI to use this mode ! Your source is completly destroyed by doing this.

Quote:
What would be the best way to changefps to 25 and will i have to redo audio as i plan to use the original 5.1 ac3 file.
You don't have other choice than using "ChangeFPS" in avisynth. But there is no real chance to obtain somethign really good.
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  #3  
10-20-2004, 10:55 AM
Boulder Boulder is offline
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There's no such thing as a progressive 29.97fps stream, only interlaced ones or telecined ones which are actually progressive 23.976fps.

You can

1) use Force FILM to restore the progressive frames at 23.976fps and then use AssumeFPS(25) in your script

or

2) IVTC if it's telecined and use AssumeFPS(25)

or

3) if the stream is truly interlaced 29.97fps, do the conversion to 23.976fps with the specific function (see the sticky thread) and use AssumeFPS(25)

There is no way you can use the original AC3 track, you need to re-encode to maintain a/v sync.
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  #4  
10-20-2004, 11:08 AM
Dialhot Dialhot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boulder
There's no such thing as a progressive 29.97fps stream
And what about new progressive scan camcorder ? They record in true 29.970p.

Look at this for instance : http://bg.broadcastengineering.com/a..._delivers_new/
(jsut the first one I found doing a quick search on yahoo)
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  #5  
10-20-2004, 11:32 AM
incredible incredible is offline
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I think that 29.97p mode of that camera "could" be in real a smart bobbed 60p stream (out of "temporarely" 29.97 interlaced). Thats also done if people want to see real interlaced mpeg4 encodings on PC Screen. Yep, its twice the amount of the data (if not previewed with avisynth but really encoded), but the quality of the view PC-Screen makes it worse )

I dont know a REAL Film/Video industry 29.97p Format, .... maybe thats out of my knowledge or again a marketing trick, like capture card vendors who make it "possible" to record full TV 4:3 on 720x576(480) *lol
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  #6  
10-20-2004, 11:41 AM
Dialhot Dialhot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by incredible
I dont know a REAL Film/Video industry 29.97p Format,
Just theorical supposition (to tired and occupied to verify) but isn't this the future for HD format (both HD-TV and HD-DVD) ?
Progressive scan hardware is developping everywhere and I'm quite sure this is not just for bobbing pre-existant 29.97i material.
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  #7  
10-20-2004, 11:43 AM
incredible incredible is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dialhot
Just theorical supposition (to tired and occupied to verify) but isn't this the future for HD format (both HD-TV and HD-DVD) ?
Yep, could be, but as said, thats maybe out of my knowledge, so we should figure that out.
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  #8  
10-20-2004, 12:32 PM
kev23m kev23m is offline
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This is the dvd for Gone in 60 seconds.
Preview in dvd2avi shows as NTSC Film 98% , so i guess its been telcined to 29.97.

Shall try and use assumeFps and redo the audio and see the result or wait to combine it with another movie later on.

Thanks for the replies.
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  #9  
10-20-2004, 12:46 PM
Prodater64 Prodater64 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev23m
This is the dvd for Gone in 60 seconds.
Preview in dvd2avi shows as NTSC Film 98% , so i guess its been telcined to 29.97.

Shall try and use assumeFps and redo the audio and see the result or wait to combine it with another movie later on.

Thanks for the replies.
Then your source is not 29.970 progressive, but 29.970 telecined. You can obtain, as you do it, with force film in DVD2AVI, a 23.976 progressive.
In avs script you can use assumeFPS(25).
And you need to process audio with Besweet.
2 options:

Code:
1. -ota( -r 23976 25000 )
2. -soundstretch( -r 23976 25000 )
Option 1 will change the pitch (almost nothing, only about 4%)
Option 2 will keep the pitch.

Don't do frequency change at same time that audiorate change (fps change), as with ac3 to ac3 maybe don't works.


EDITED
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  #10  
10-20-2004, 12:50 PM
Dialhot Dialhot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev23m
NTSC Film 98% , so i guess its been telcined to 29.97.
98% film means that the source is progressivel 23.976 with a software 3:2 pulldown that let you (and the player) think it is 29.970. That is what "NTSC film" means (opposite, "NTSC Video" that is 29.970i".

In other words, you did the correct thing in using "force film" in DVD2AVI.

Quote:
Shall try and use assumeFps and redo the audio and see the result or wait to combine it with another movie later on.
If you can use this source with an other movie, it will be better for you !
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  #11  
10-21-2004, 12:03 AM
kev23m kev23m is offline
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Doing that , gonna wait to combine the pal with some other one.

though i did try it out, the sound was out from the start.
Used AssumeFps and redid the audio with beweet using soundstretch as prodater suggested.
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  #12  
10-21-2004, 02:16 AM
Prodater64 Prodater64 is offline
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Does audio (soundstretched or no soundstretched) and video stream have same playtime?
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  #13  
10-21-2004, 07:53 PM
kev23m kev23m is offline
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Did not really check it oo much , cos as soon as i authored and saw sound was out , i just deleted all the temp files.

My Dvd plays NTSC / PAL both so rather wait and make a 2 in 1 Pal combination.
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