Quantcast HDD vs SSD in 2019? - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
02-01-2019, 07:38 PM
Reading Bug Reading Bug is offline
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As I previously asked about HDDs in 2017 here, I thought Id update for the new year to ask the state of SSD and just how close we are to them becoming more affordable and more trustworthy (several years ago the expert advice was that their reliability/longevity is not on par with traditional HDD).

Has anything improved? The prices mostly look the same.
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  #2  
02-01-2019, 08:30 PM
Angies_Husband Angies_Husband is offline
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I am not sure that SSD will ever pass HDD for cheapest $/byte of storage...

I personally have never had issues with SSDs (for my OS). I think that Win 7 and beyond have native support for all that SSDs need to function well (TRIM, etc...)

I will say that in the past few years the new M.2 form factor SSDs are ridiculously fast. Samsung 970 EVO is the leader in the space I think (best price/speed/value). You will need a newer motherboard that can take that type of drive though.

I can't comment on external drives. I use WD Red 4TB drives in RAID 1.
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  #3  
02-01-2019, 10:21 PM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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The #1 issue with SSD failure is that when it fails, it fails completely and usually without any sign (i.e. noisy platters, failed/failing blocks/sectors, slow performance, etc). There are a couple of companies that claim to be able to recover data, but it's a lot more expensive than the already very expensive HDD recovery.

They're great for OS drives, but they're not archival and good for specialized applications such as games which require a large amount of disc activity.
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  #4  
02-01-2019, 10:29 PM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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Reading your 2017 post (which I remember reading), the bottom line is nothing's changed and won't likely change in the near future. SSDs are coming down in price, but so are HDDs. Price per TB is down to less than $20/TB for 4TB+ drives and seems to have stabilized in the past couple of years at that price.

My personal strategy is to buy large 8TB+ HDDs and actively use them until they're near their warranty end (1-3 years), then move them to archive status and replace with new cheaper/larger drives. A couple of years ago, I swapped out all my 4TB drives for 8TB+ with the idea that less drives = less chance of failure.
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  #5  
03-11-2019, 01:17 AM
Tig_ Tig_ is offline
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Reading Bug,

Both hard drives and SSDs can fail without warning, and if you search long enough you'll find anecdotes decrying each technology and every brand because someone had a drive go bad. Key point: either way, you need data redundancy.

That said, I trust today's SSDs over today's hard drives. No contest. Not just because unlike hard drives, SSDs contain no moving parts; nor because wear leveling techniques and the underlying NAND flash memory have become sufficiently sophisticated that you'd have to read/write tens of terabytes daily to kill a mainstream current-model SSD in the next decade.

No, the real reason I trust SSDs more now is that in addition to the above, they're much, much faster. Performance is relevant to resilience if you're following good practices (having redundancy through RAID, backups, etc.) because the faster you can restore data from a backup, the lower the odds the backup drive will fail before you're done.

Those odds are dangerously high with modern HDDs, because hard drives have increased in capacity faster than they've increased in performance, to such an extent that eventually losing both a main drive and its backup is more likely than not for anyone storing lots of data today. Given the amount of video-centric conversation on this forum, I'd say that applies to most of us here. I can expound on this later if you'd like, with some numbers.

Price is obviously the rub. Only in the past few months have I seen SSDs hit $100/TB on sale. HDDs drop to $20/TB as frequently, so if you're going to spend 5x more you better have a damn good reason. And I'll give it to you.

Let's say you need a new drive for your OS and apps, to free up your hard drives for video capture and storage. You're considering a 1TB SSD and a 2TB hard drive for this task. The SSD is $100 while the HDD is $50 for twice the capacity. The SSD looks bad at a glance.

But let's say that SSD saves you 5min/day of waiting for little things (mine do: apps loading, etc., just a few seconds here and there). That's 30hrs per year. If you have the drive for 5yrs (the HDD might not last that long, but I bet the SSD will), you've saved 150hrs.

My point is that, even if you value your time at only $1/hr, the SSD pays for itself even if it doesn't save your butt from a botched restore from backup. Meanwhile, you enjoy the responsiveness of working with an SSD.

That's for an OS drive. Would I do it for my main data archive? No, not yet; the costs would outweigh the benefits in my case.

My opinion: today's SSDs are better in every way, including resilience. You pay 4x for it though (more for m.2 SSDs), so use it wisely. Make sure you regularly back up anything you're not prepared to lose, and if possible, use realtime redundancy like RAID (personally I've switched to DrivePool for that).
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  #6  
03-12-2019, 11:55 PM
Sergei316 Sergei316 is offline
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Now is the time to start acquiring some SSD drives. Prices have and will continue to plummet this year into the end of the 2nd quarter. Manufacturers have slowed down production to offset the bottoming out of DRAM prices. Capacities are starting to increase and the price per gigabyte is way better than it was in March of 2018.

Currently on Newegg https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...82E16820167461, Intel 660p 2tb NVME drive is agressively priced.

I am still concerned with reliability. I have smoked 2 Mushkin SSD drives over the last few years. Although, I also smoked a WD Black 1 TB HD drive during the same period.

For OS and CACHE drives for an NLE system, you cant go wrong. For long term storage HD are still the way to go.

You can checkout BlackBlaze's Annual Hard Drive report for a good reference to drive reliability.
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-...tats-for-2018/
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  #7  
03-13-2019, 12:19 AM
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... huh ... oh ... wake me when 8tb SSD is $499, or at least 4tb for $299 ... (5 more minutes?) ...

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  #8  
03-13-2019, 06:30 AM
Tig_ Tig_ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sergei316 View Post
You can checkout BlackBlaze's Annual Hard Drive report for a good reference to drive reliability.
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-...tats-for-2018/
I forgot to mention that in my post; large-scale model-specific statistics are far more useful than "avoid brand x," as every manufacturer's drives vary in reliability from model to model. Also important to note that we all eventually have drives fail, but those experiences are statistically insignificant. Even Backblaze's statistics are a drop in the pond but are the best representation most of us can get.
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  #9  
04-06-2019, 07:08 AM
peco99 peco99 is offline
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Quote:
As I previously asked about HDDs in 2017 here, I thought Id update for the new year to ask the state of SSD and just how close we are to them becoming more affordable and more trustworthy (several years ago the expert advice was that their reliability/longevity is not on par with traditional HDD).

Has anything improved? The prices mostly look the same.
Quote:
Now is the time to start acquiring some SSD drives. Prices have and will continue to plummet this year into the end of the 2nd quarter. Manufacturers have slowed down production to offset the bottoming out of DRAM prices. Capacities are starting to increase and the price per gigabyte is way better than it was in March of 2018.
Currently on Newegg https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167461, Intel 660p 2tb NVME drive is agressively priced.

I am still concerned with reliability. I have smoked 2 Mushkin SSD drives over the last few years. Although, I also smoked a WD Black 1 TB HD drive during the same period.

For OS and CACHE drives for an NLE system, you cant go wrong. For long term storage HD are still the way to go.

You can checkout BlackBlaze's Annual Hard Drive report for a good reference to drive reliability.
https://www.backblaze.com/blog/hard-...tats-for-2018/
Still SSD is costly compared to HDD. However, those who are not concern money and give importance to the performance choose SSD over HDD.
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