Quantcast Bad sectors on playable DVD - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
04-27-2010, 05:28 PM
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I have a dvd (movie that probably has macro on it) that plays fine, at least I don't see any problems when watching, but it won't copy, the read say's can't read and errors and using decrypter it won't copy off as an ISO, I even turned off the read errors, it just gave me over 1000 re-tries ...how is the best way to handle this?
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  #2  
04-28-2010, 06:40 AM
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Two possible options here...

1. Is this a retail DVD?

If so, then it may have a new form of "copy protection" (intentional corruption of the data by the studio), that cannot be understood by the legacy software DVD Decrypter.

You'll want to try ripping the disc with the newer applications that are available. I'm not a fan of the workflow or features of modern rippers, so I suggest only using them on discs when needed. DVD Decrypter is fine for most discs, especially TV shows and most "non-blockbuster" type movies. In other words, the $5 bin movies at Walmart will work fine in DVD Decrypter, while this week's newest movie (Avatar, for example) probably won't.

These include:
There's also the free-while-Beta DVDFab Passkey (an AnyDVD-like program), but I'm not a fan of beta testing software. It may not only not work, beta software can sometimes screw up a computer.

2. Is the disc good?

The DVD uses error correction for DVD-Video players, and DVD players have the ability to gloss over finer errors. A DVD player need not read bit-for-bit accurate to mostly playback a video.

But a computer does need bit-for-bit accuracy, and will fail to read the disc image/data if it's not good data.

ISO Puzzle is a great tool for recovering data on bad discs, but you'll have to use AnyDVD or DVDFab Passkey for copy-protected discs. More on using ISO Puzzle for optical disc data recovery, and some other methods, at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/show...a-bad-421.html

...

That's really the only two options. Good luck!

And remember ... post a reply, to let us know what works! (That goes for anybody reading this post -- yes, you!)

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  #3  
04-29-2010, 01:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by admin View Post
Two possible options here...

1. Is this a retail DVD?

If so, then it may have a new form of "copy protection" (intentional corruption of the data by the studio), that cannot be understood by the legacy software DVD Decrypter.

You'll want to try ripping the disc with the newer applications that are available. I'm not a fan of the workflow or features of modern rippers, so I suggest only using them on discs when needed. DVD Decrypter is fine for most discs, especially TV shows and most "non-blockbuster" type movies. In other words, the $5 bin movies at Walmart will work fine in DVD Decrypter, while this week's newest movie (Avatar, for example) probably won't.

These include:
There's also the free-while-Beta DVDFab Passkey (an AnyDVD-like program), but I'm not a fan of beta testing software. It may not only not work, beta software can sometimes screw up a computer.

2. Is the disc good?

The DVD uses error correction for DVD-Video players, and DVD players have the ability to gloss over finer errors. A DVD player need not read bit-for-bit accurate to mostly playback a video.

But a computer does need bit-for-bit accuracy, and will fail to read the disc image/data if it's not good data.

ISO Puzzle is a great tool for recovering data on bad discs, but you'll have to use AnyDVD or DVDFab Passkey for copy-protected discs. More on using ISO Puzzle for optical disc data recovery, and some other methods, at http://www.digitalFAQ.com/forum/show...a-bad-421.html

...

That's really the only two options. Good luck!

And remember ... post a reply, to let us know what works! (That goes for anybody reading this post -- yes, you!)
I always try to reply as to what works, like you, I like to share the knowledge.
This disk is probably a year to two old and I have 2 others from the same studio in the series that ripped fine with decrypter, this subject disk had some scratches (I have seen much worse) so I used my old trick of a little toothpaste and the scratches are 90% gone, still gets to like 61% and cant read the sectors, I have not tried to copy using the Liteon (dvd to dvd), maybe it will get around the macro, probably not.

I was hoping there was some way to just bypass what the computer could not read and see if I could get the majority of it anyway...or get rid of the advertisements, previews and menus and just record off the main movie, or is this complicated?
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04-29-2010, 01:59 AM
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The "toothpaste" trick is more of a myth than anything else. Here's why:
  1. Many times "scratches" are just smudges or dirty spots, in a linear pattern. Any detergent/soap and water would clean it.
  2. If the disc DOES actually have scratches or other abrasions on the surface, the non-clear toothpaste material would actually work to block more light from passing! Yes, this means you just made the disc worse!
  3. Sometimes fine scratches can really be buffed out, although it's unlikely. More common, you just add more to it, be they visible or not. (Think: microscratches!) And if it were the case than you could buff a small scratch out without causing more damage, again any detergent/soap would work.
  4. Most toothpastes have additives that are more harmful than not.
"Brasso" is another myth.

Yes, there is anecdotal evidence that this "works", but it reminds me of the story of the lady who stands on her porch every morning and shouts "go away lions" and is convinced that's why she's never been attacked by a lion -- nevermind that she lives in inner city London (or Dallas or Tokyo or wherever you've not likely to run into a lion).

To truly "repair" a disc surface, it needs a professional re-buffering. Many local mom-and-pop video rental stores have these devices. My local store carries the $5K+ RTI DiscChek Eco Senior from http://www.discchek.com and charges $3 per cleaning/resurfacing. You can only do it a few times, and then the machine has settings for CD, CD-R, DVD, DVD-R, etc., because each media has it's own specs on how much can be shaved and buffed.

Excluding, the #1 and #2 items from a few posts up, and this new cleaning information, all you can do is put the DVD in a player, hook it into a DVD recorder, and do an analog copy. Oh, and cross your fingers and hope the DVD player doesn't also choke on the disc -- which is unfortunately the case, most times.

Good luck!

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  #5  
04-29-2010, 03:52 PM
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Not disagreeing with what you said, but I learned about the toothpaste trick when I was renting movies and had many that would not play correctly on my player till I did the toothpaste treatment, I have seen this at least a dozen times, so something happens...maybe just good cleaning?

And by choke do you mean.."copying has been stopped because of copyrighted material" crap...
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  #6  
04-29-2010, 04:04 PM
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Yeah, you were just giving it a good cleaning. Dish soap would have been just as good. That's actually what I use on stubborn rentals -- an old sock (rag under sink) and soapy dishwater.

Yep, choke with anti-copy, or choke because disc is bad and stops playing.

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