Quantcast Never Use a Sticky Label on a DVD !!! - digitalFAQ Forum
  #1  
04-07-2010, 11:35 PM
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For many videographers and serious video hobbyists, this is already old knowledge, but it still plagues many amateurs and newbies.


DO NOT USE A STICKY LABEL ON A DVD.

Period. Never. Nada. No exceptions!

If you want to blame somebody for this, blame
  1. physics
  2. greedy companies
The physics is because a disc is spinning while also needing to remain flat to that axis. If a disc wobbles too much, then it cannot be written or read correctly. You get failed burns (coasters) or reading errors. A paper sticky label adds uneven weight to a disc, causing an imbalance, thereby causing excess wobble, and thus creating read/write problems with labeled discs.

The greedy companies should already know the physics of discs, but selling labels to unsuspecting dupes is another easy profit maker for them. It's honestly a product that is sold because people are dumb enough to buy it. If this is you, I'm sorry, but you've been used. The same is true of "DVD safe" markers, just FYI -- something sold because buyers are gullible.


Then How Do "Other People" Label Discs?

Well, they're not using labels. They print on a disc, or they get discs mass replicated and screen/thermal printed. The discs you buy in stores, retail movie releases, are not using sticky labels -- those image are printed on when the discs are replicated. (Note: Retail DVDs are not burned, they are pressed and replicated in bulk.)

If you feel the need to put images on a disc, then use printable inkjet media, along with an inkjet disc printer. Inkjet media costs about $10-15 more per 100-pack than branded or plain silver discs, but it's worth it.

Suggested blank inkjet DVDs ($25-40 price range):
Examples of disc inkjet printers:

Keep Perspective!

Remember that a disc receives only a few fleeting seconds of viewing time. Compare this to the DVD case, which can get several minutes of viewing/reading time, or the DVD menu, which can also get several minutes of viewing time. The ROI on a disc image is rather low, so budget and plan accordingly. There's no sense in blowing a media budget on disc art, and skimping in other areas. A disc with a "pretty picture" on top should come very, very low on the to-do list.

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  #2  
04-07-2010, 11:48 PM
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Wanted to share a few added thoughts...

Until a few days ago, I thought the sticky label issue was solved years ago, with most people understanding that it's a bad idea. But apparently that's not the case. It appears there are some really misleading articles out there suggesting labels are okay. LABELS ARE NOT OKAY! This thread was mostly written in response to that misguided advice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BAD ADVICE from ezinearticles.com article #69158 -- DO NOT DO THIS!
b. Use adhesive labels. Opt for the full, donut-style stickers that cover the entire disc. Avoid tiny stickers (such as mailing labels) that can affect the balance and performance of your DVD as it spins in your player. Small labels can also easily come loose and damage your player during playback. DVD burning problems are often the result of a compendium of mistakes, many of which can be avoided using good old common sense.
I find it amusing that somebody has suggested using labels -- one of the most causes for playback issues with homemade discs -- and then goes on to discuss disc balance. This was clearly written by somebody that had no idea what they were writing. This article looks to be badly-rewritten, using information found on other sites (including digitalFAQ). This person's only goal was to link to their junkware spam site at easydvdburning.com -- a spammy "DVD copying" site that exists purely for affiliate commissions.

This is just a warning that you need to be very wary of what you read online. Not everybody has your best interests in mind, be it spam-writing idiots (blackhat SEO tricks), or greedy label-selling companies. Buyer (and reader) beware!

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  #3  
04-08-2010, 07:42 AM
thiagoff8 thiagoff8 is offline
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THXXX Ótima dica...

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04-08-2010, 08:00 AM
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Wait a minute!?! O.o not understand. In the 1st post says it is not recommended to put adhesive on the label of the DVD / CD. In the second, I read that you can put adhesive if it is placed around the label of the CD / DVD, not merely a label. Now my doubt is can not or adhesive label of the DVD / CD?
The first post tells you NOT to use sticky labels.

The second post was also pointing out how it is NOT okay to use sticky labels. It features a quote from a badly-written dumb article, and I was pointing out the bad advice. I was also making a statement on how many bad articles are out there these days, existing purely for spam purposes.

DO NOT USE STICKY LABELS ON DVDs!

Comprende?

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  #5  
12-29-2010, 02:05 PM
jmac698 jmac698 is offline
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So what's the best brand of sticky label? *jk* I have a good question, how do I label a DL disc? I can't find DL in Labelflash or printable versions. So I'm left with a marker, and I can't find cd printers either (not at the local Walmart).
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12-29-2010, 06:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmac698 View Post
I can't find DL ... printable versions.
What about these: Verbatim 96862 8.5GB 8X DataLifePlus White Inkjet Printable DVD+R DL, 50 Disc Spindle
$74.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B0024TNXNG

That's what I use.

There's also the Verbatim DVD+R DL as LightScribe (and LabelFlash ~ LightScribe)
Verbatim 96689 8.5 GB 8x LightScribe Double-Layer Recordable Disc DVD+R DL, 10-Disc Spindle
Currently $20.69 with Free Standard Shipping
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B001JIHF0U

Either of those fit your needs?

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  #7  
12-29-2010, 07:34 PM
jmac698 jmac698 is offline
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Wow, that's really expensive, but the lightscribe would be cheaper for small projects. I'm also wondering about packaging, if you were putting a home movie on DVD, do you ever use those tall soft cases like real DVD's come in? I've never seen the insert kit for them. I did get some thick jewel cases and a jewel insert kit from an American company called Staples.
I didn't think of shopping online because I needed it now, but I'll have to get supplies ahead of time for later.
Thanks!
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12-29-2010, 07:44 PM
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Expensive? Well, expense is relative. I still have these receipts from 2001-2002 timeframe:
- $9 each, Pioneer 1x DVD-R in 10-pack slim case
- $3 each, Ritek 1x DVD-R in 50-pack spindle
- $5.50 each, Apple 2x DVD-R in 5-pack jewel case

VHS tapes used to be $2-3 each for the good ones, $1 or so for the junk ones. DVD is better than VHS was, in terms of quality of video it can hold.
So considering all of these things, a printable high-quality DVD+R DL for $1.50 isn't really that awful.

Yes, your best bet for good media is online, especially for "specialty" media like inkjet discs.

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  #9  
12-30-2010, 03:07 AM
jmac698 jmac698 is offline
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I thought there might be a more authoritative answer about labels, so I wanted to check the actual quality/manufacturing specs for DVD's themselves.
However, what I ran into is this reference, which is quite interesting.

Quote:
German computer magazine c't (No. 9/2004) has a test of CD and DVD labels, with quantitative results.

They performed the tests under "optimal" conditions, i.e. well placed labels (centered, no bubbles) and short term storage under office conditions for 6 label types from 3 vendors (Avery-Zweckform, Herma and Sigel) on both CDs and DVDs. The physical properties (unbalance, jitter and planarity or "angular deviation") and error rates (BLER or PI Sum 8 ) were measured with a CATS scanner and other devices by Audiodev before and after the labels were applied.

Here a short summary:

* Thinner labels affect the media less than thicker ones
* CD's are not noticeably affected by well placed labels (N.B. this is for scans @1x).

- BLER, 3T-jitter and unbalance weren't significantly affected.

- Angular deviation more than doubled though (typical: 0.8° -> 1.8°), and exceeded the specs (max. 1.6°). This may cause problems at high reading speeds.
* DVD's are essentially destroyed by most labels- PI Sum 8 > 1000 (from 10) and DC-jitter > 13% (from 8%) are typical. The high information density leads to strong reactions to the increased angular deviation, particularly in the outer parts of the discs. Only one make (Herma 8994, a silver plastic foil) was "OK".
In another reference I read the discovery that it's the stiffness of the label which pulls the disc inward (relatively) as it's spinning, causing the outer edges to become bowed. This non-ideal flatness can cause reading problems. Some drive mechanisms are made to deal with warped DVD's and will work better.
This explains why some people never have a problem with sticky labels; either it's the label brand they are using or the drive mechanism they are using.
There *are* sticky labels which work fine. Look for a plastic film based label. Avery sells one, Matte White Film DVD Lablels, #8962 and it's the only American brand that's actually guaranteed to work with DVD's on the box and mentions the actual problem that labels cause.
Hub labels work fine too.
Paper-based sticky labels which cause problems due to stiffness will have problems playing at the END of the video, which is the outer edge of the DVD, where it will be most bowed.
If a paper-based, sticky label gives you problems, here's what to do: #1 Sponge it with water. This loosens the paper enough to let it play. #2 bend the disc up in the middle. This relieves some stress from the paper #3 Cut score marks in the label. This also reduces stress (just like the expansion grooves in concrete). #4 Avoid the problem by not burning the full length of the DVD.
The entire theory of off balance being an issue in a properly applied label, I would say is suspect anyhow because DVD players only play at 1x speed, this is a pretty low RPM. If it played in a DVD player but not when read at 16x in a DVD ROM, that would be more telling. Envelope labels on one side of a disk *are* a problem, this will cause balance issues.

CD's are not affected because they have larger tracks and are more resillient to warping. This also applies to Video CD's.

Lesson learned; when you see a controversial topic, there is a pattern in there somewhere to be discovered. Both sides are right! The devil is in the details. To say "avoid sticky labels at all costs" is too much of a generalization.
Of course, using a sharpie, label printer, or Lightscribe is another option. Be aware that people have legitimate uses for printed labels despite there being other ways of doing it!

Last edited by jmac698; 12-30-2010 at 03:46 AM.
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12-30-2010, 04:08 AM
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Quick Summary: for the bored eyes: use plastic film sticky labels like Matte White Film DVD Lablels, #8962, or hub labels. These are fine. Avoid paper labels. If you use paper labels, avoid filling the entire disc. Off balance is not the real issue, stiffness is. You can also use a CD printer, Lightscribe, or markers. Tip: use different colored markers to categorize your discs (good/bad movie, drama/action, data/video, widescreen/fullframe). Signs of the label being a problem are, movie breaks up on at the end. Fix paper labels by just wetting the label and reading again. Envelope labels on one side will cause a balance problem. Some drive mechanisms can read warped discs better than others.
Labels of any type are fine with CDs and Video Cds.
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02-11-2011, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
more authoritative answer
Quote:
German computer magazine c't
Well, I'd point out that c't isn't much different than staff at digitalFAQ.com -- i.e., technically inclined journalists willing to spend time on independent research and sharing of the analysis. In years past, c't has indeed had some very interesting articles. I have several issues somewhere in a file.

The major flaw in the c't article, however, as it relates to CD labels, is the lack of aging. There are significant temporal affects on media, as it relates to the changes in the label over time. The glues allow for shifting and bubbling of the labels after maybe 5 years. I have a number of examples of this in the media research spindles.

Quote:
it's the stiffness of the label which pulls the disc inward (relatively) as it's spinning, causing the outer edges to become bowed
I've read this before, but I'm not a believer in this hypothesis. I've yet to see any research that would confirm it. For such a scenario to exist, the label would have to be applied with a warped tool, and pressed on with a decent amount of force. In fact, I'd suggest it's pretty much impossible. If nothing else, the strength of the DVD upper polycarbonate easily outweighs the paper and glue, and the label would give. Maybe not instantly after applied, but definitely within a short amount of time. On a CD, the label would rip the lacquer and foil right off the lower polycarbonate. So I'd have to classify this as a myth. Most times, you see this written in a user forum, by some random person that doesn't really understand the sciences involved.

Quote:
There *are* sticky labels which work fine. Look for a plastic film based label. Avery sells one, Matte White Film DVD Lablels, #8962 and it's the only American brand that's actually guaranteed to work with DVD's on the box and mentions the actual problem that labels cause.
Yes and no. The translucent "label" more closely mimics the inkjet surface that is applied to media, as opposed to a thick paper label. But even then, it can easily off-balance the media and cause errors. I've seen these in use by rental operations, and it still tends to shorten the lifespan of the media. I'd avoid these as well.

Quote:
Hub labels work fine too.
Again, it really comes down to application and glue quality. Although these may not necessarily alter the disc balance, hub labels can cause slippage of the media, as a DVD player holds media by the hub. So again, you're adding an unintended after-market product that was never part of the design specs of the original product. And then there are issue with good placement. I've seen hub labels come apart on player spindles, or otherwise shed paper dust into the unit.

Quote:
I would say is suspect anyhow because DVD players only play at 1x speed, this is a pretty low RPM. If it played in a DVD player but not when read at 16x in a DVD ROM, that would be more telling.
It's all relative. Compared to a 16x DVD read, sure, 1x is pretty slow. But it's really not an issue of velocity anyway, and rather one of weight and balance. For this conversation, the velocity is at best an affected force, as opposed to an effected force.

Quote:
To say "avoid sticky labels at all costs" is too much of a generalization.
Well, I'd argue that generalities exist for reason -- namely that they're generally accurate assessments. I'd also mention that the exception to a rule doesn't override the rule. At best, it adds an asterisk to the statement, with in-depth footnotes for those willing to deal with the more complex information. To make it more agreeable, it could say "Except for these few situations, avoid labels at all costs." Of course, that's too long of a title, and it interrupts the flow of information and the impact of the warning. That's been an off-and-on complaint through the years, against some of the information found on this site -- some people try to nitpick it to death with an information-clogging amount of if's, and's and but's that would turn easy-to-digest guides into complex mini-novels filled with jargon that nobody would ever read. Of course, that was often concerning guides, and this is the forum -- and discussion of complex issues are most definitely encouraged here.

Quote:
Of course, using a sharpie, label printer, or Lightscribe is another option.
I'd suggest this is an ideal approach to marking a disc with visible ID information.

Good chat.

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  #12  
02-11-2011, 07:54 PM
jmac698 jmac698 is offline
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Quote:
is the lack of aging
I agree, the research says nothing about long term effects. The scientific approach is to not judge anything until it's
actually tested. A surprising result is usually welcomed in fact, as this means there is more to learn.
Quote:
I've yet to see any research that would confirm it.
I would argue that there is signifcant evidence for this theory - the c't article definitively pointed to increased angular error,
beyond spec, of the discs with applied labels. This was the cause of the read errors, in fact.
However, I think I understand your line of thought. I agree that the DVD material is stronger than paper, but
any applied force affects it's bending. In this case you have an imbalance of forces; the label side is being pulled
inswards, no matter how slightly, but enough to cause the added 1 degree of angular error. It's not a matter
of the paper label breaking; it's a matter of added tension. Think of the paper more like a rubber band adding tension.
Quote:
I've seen these in use by rental operations, and it still tends to shorten the lifespan of the media.
I found an inkjet printable DVD with sticky label on a commercial DVD (short run) at my local library. It was in
circulation for 5 years, and I was able to read it with no errors. Hardly a generalization, but at least it's possible
for a sticky label to last for 5 years.

I feel hopeful from this fact, but I can't scientifically say I reject or accept long-term use of sticky labels. Do you have any references to further support your opinions? How much does probability affect a recommendation? Certainly it seems possible that one could find ruined discs as well as good ones, but if it's quite unlikely one way, is that reason to totally avoid it? I don't think we really know the answer anyhow.

As much as I'd like to make a nice looking product for a customer, I would unfortunately have to use only LightScribe DVD-DL's as the next best option for now, in the case of long-term, home memories preserving, DVD transfers. Of course I could give them both and if one dies they still have the other There is also the idea of putting the video 'on the cloud' for the younger generation who would most likely watch their childhood-selves on (private) YouTube. (Is there private YouTube? I've never uploaded to it.)

My main interest is in providing the client with a professional looking product. At worst they could come back to me 5 years later and say 'my disc is skipping 2 hours of the way through'. I don't know how important that tid-bit of video is to them. I could use the suggested techniques to copy and re-burn their video. Actually it's unlikely they'd come back to me at all. Of course I don't want them to be disappointed at all.

Last edited by jmac698; 02-11-2011 at 08:12 PM.
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  #13  
02-11-2011, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Think of the paper more like a rubber band adding tension.
But this would imply elasticity in the paper, but that would counter the argument that the paper is stiff enough to cause the warping in the first place. While I can see your point in a hypothetical sense, I would consider the actual products available -- and most of those are cheap crap-grade papers and glues. Given that information, the hypothesis looks less likely.

Quote:
it's possible for a sticky label to last for 5 years.
Absolutely. I have labels that were applied to discs 10+ years ago. However, there are definitive effects on the integrity of the media, and the ability for it to be read error-free. As more time goes by, more of these discs end up in the trashcan. In 2009, I ripped every CD and data DVD that I had, dumping it to a large hard drive -- just in case. And I'm glad I did, because I lost more discs in 2010-2011; most of them were labeled CD-Rs from the 1990s.

Quote:
How much does probability affect a recommendation? Certainly it seems possible that one could find ruined discs as well as good ones, but if it's quite unlikely one way, is that reason to totally avoid it?
My opinion would be "yes" -- it's best avoided if there is a measurable danger, and longevity is important. If longevity is not a concern (not archival use media), then label away. Just be prepared for disc loss, and have a plan in place to easily create a new one (or replace it from another source).

I can't give specific details, but one of our recent projects involved about 100 labeled DVDs. About 10% of them were severely damaged. Of those, half were unrecoverable in whole or in part. And these were recently-labeled media. There were some mitigating issues (scratches, cheap CMC discs), but the problems were still heavily related to labels.

You'd be surprised at what some studios do internally. Shocked, in fact.

I think 5% loss is unacceptable for otherwise-fine DVDs. And that number will climb as months and years go by. I'd suggest it comes in close to the 50% mark, based on my own experiences and observations in the past 15 years of burning media. (And I'm definitely not a casual user.)

Labeling just never ends well.

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  #14  
02-11-2011, 08:27 PM
jmac698 jmac698 is offline
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Thanks for describing your experience. I think that in general, you have reduced your experience to a good 'rule of thumb'. Now I am more convinced that labels are a significant source of error.
I don't know which specific brands of label caused the problems, but I can see how you would say it was to be avoided.

Therefore I have to agree with you. Scientifically, I shouldn't agree with you until I have more facts, which you have now provided.

Avoid sticky labels Thanks for informing me! You have great experience.

My next question would be, name a specific current model of media inkjet printers, and where can I buy it. I can't find *any*. I have one theory for this, perhaps the powers-that-be are pressuring manufacturers to *not* make this equipment as a an anti-piracy measure. Of course it may simply be a product that's not in demand, but I don't understand why; certainly a full color label is more desirable than the LabelFlash alternative.
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02-11-2011, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
As much as I'd like to make a nice looking product for a customer
The ROI isn't there (no return on investment).

Generally speaking, the average consumer customer doesn't care about the disc label. They're far more interested in video and audio quality, and that's honestly the right approach anyway. Those who would want a "pretty" aspect to their work can opt for custom menus and/or custom DVD cases. But few ever opt for these added services. Most appear to be quite content with their own handwriting and empty DVD cases that they've dumpster-dived from behind Blockbuster (or bought in a cheap bulk pack at the local office store). Some video conversion companies try to lure in customers with promises of "free professional custom DVD cases" (translation: amateur template crap), but people are really not swayed by it. The typical response could be summed up with one word: "whatever".

To be quite blunt about it, the few clients who would insist on disc artwork for their one-off single-copy DVDs are often not worth having as clients. Disc artwork is an expensive process, both in time and materials, when it's not being used for mass-produced professionally-screened discs. And the same clients who want custom art for their one-off discs are never willing to pay for the time and costs involved.

One of the biggest challenges with artwork is acquiring the sources. And you can't simply extract a frame from the video, and expect it to look good for print. Most non-business customers are far too lazy (or "busy" as they often say) to scrounge up some nice family photos as artwork sources.

Disc artwork, for non-commercial purposes, is mostly an exercise in futility that doubles as a money vampire.

Quote:
Of course it may simply be a product that's not in demand, but I don't understand why; certainly a full color label is more desirable than the LabelFlash alternative.
Costs of the printer and supplies have made them a not-in-demand type of item. Most home inkjet printers are loss-leader products, and depend on mass-scale sales to create a sustainable market. And most of the profit comes from the ink carts. When demand isn't there, prices skyrocket, making them even less in demand. That's why ink printer prices jump from under $75 to about $500+ for photo/disc printers, and for why far fewer models exist.

Finding these printers isn't too hard. Primera makes most of them. For example, the Primera Bravo SE from Amazon for $890. Notice that most disc printers are "auto" systems designed for printing spindles worth of DVDs. Not to say that you can't print one disc, but rather than the idea of a disc printer is intended for "by the dozens" mass production of the same disc. It's far more cost effective to run with a disc service when you approach 500+ discs.

Even then, you have to question the ROI, both financial and non-financial. (i.e., Does the audience/demographic really care?)

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02-11-2011, 08:37 PM
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p.s., it's interesting how we have certain expectations of certain organizations, like studios. In reality, they are not necessarily some kind of uber-gurus, but ordinary people with no specific hardcore knowledge. I remember finding an error in a pressing of Dire Straits "Money for Nothing", and someone just couldn't believe that a commercial CD could have an error, yet it was clearly not scratched in the slightest. I'm sure they used Pro Tools for Mac like anyone else in the industry, at the time. Some kind of user error. I found another error on a CD where is was distorted due to the volume being too high. I knew the artist as well, practically speaking it was of no significance as the producer had a lot of connections that might help the band, even if I could technically produce a superior CD.

Quote:
They're far more interested in video and audio quality
Wow, I'm learning a lot from your experience. I've not had the customer experience you have had, however I've been dismayed at the total neglect of quality the average consumer sees as important. I've had a course in 'personality dimensions', and I tend to equate this response as the 'practical' type of personality, which dominates by 2/3 of the general population.
However, I had no idea how irrelevant this was. Anyhow, in one particular customer, I did a restoration which wasn't technically perfect, but they seemed to find it OK. I have since learned to do a 'perfect' restoration, which I would like to offer to them for free because I feel bad that I didn't give them the best in the first pass. I have yet to see how they will react to this. Certainly they can get the idea of the video from what was provided. They didn't complain about what they had.
In context, this was a video with extremely bad dropout type defect, which showed as short, white lines in the video. I cleaned up 70% of these, but the result was somewhat blocky. I can now fix this 100%.
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  #17  
08-07-2014, 10:13 AM
monks19 monks19 is offline
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Hi. Sorry to re-open this old thing, but I thought a good updat is long overdu on this. Since now that the lightscribe technology is officially dead (discs and burner no longer made), what are now the alternatives avalaible for customers and prosumers (mostly independants videographers who shoot events like weddings) aside of the sharpie marker ?

I have nothing against the marker, but the people who are hiring me would like a bit more professionalism on that part of the job, but since the pro printers for that are only for large scale and mass marketting, lightscribe was my on viable option.

Thanks to answer
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  #18  
08-07-2014, 11:47 AM
dpalomaki dpalomaki is offline
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I've found that inkjet printable blank CDs, DVDs and BD disks work well.
The TY (now JVC) WaterShield look expecially good.
Epson offers several moderate cost printers that do a nice job on inkjet-printable media, and it they come with printing software. Printing takes around 3 minutes per disc. Graphics can be prepared in a program of your choice e.g., PhotoShop (if you have deep pockets), GIMP, etc.

And of course there are automated (robotic) printers and combination burner/printer production, such as the Primera Bravo series, for higher volume work .
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08-20-2014, 06:23 PM
monks19 monks19 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpalomaki View Post
I've found that inkjet printable blank CDs, DVDs and BD disks work well.
The TY (now JVC) WaterShield look expecially good.
Epson offers several moderate cost printers that do a nice job on inkjet-printable media, and it they come with printing software. Printing takes around 3 minutes per disc. Graphics can be prepared in a program of your choice e.g., PhotoShop (if you have deep pockets), GIMP, etc.

And of course there are automated (robotic) printers and combination burner/printer production, such as the Primera Bravo series, for higher volume work .
Any links to show some exemples of the recommanded devices & discs avalaible, please ? Also, what about the ink ? I know that the ink cartridges can be quite expensieve. Any recommandations on good & inexpensive ink ?

Thanks to answer
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08-21-2014, 09:06 AM
dpalomaki dpalomaki is offline
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Check the Epson Expression Photo XP-850 Small-in-One Printer at EPSON.COM as one example of printer.
Navigate the site: Home > Products > Epson Printers > All-in-One Printers > Expression Photo for Amazing Photos > Epson Expression Photo XP-850 Small-in-One Printer

Which printer to get depends on your overall needs. Some of the higer end printers such as the Stilus Photo R2000 and above have better inks available and do wide format high quality photo paper as well. I have used several different Epson models over the past, all printed DVD nicely (manual feed), but my printers are several years old not, not among the current models. I have not used other brand printers for CD/DVD/BD. But I have found the inkjet printable to be a reliable technology and mostly use TY brand for DVD-R.

As to ink, I tend to shy away from the generics and third party refill kits. I've had inkjet and laser printers clog or start to print poorly using them on occasion, and it is not worth the potential problem to me, but your tollerance for that risk may be different. In any case the ink is a minor portion of the cost to produce a high quality DVD or BD, especially if they are relatively small production runs.

Buy the inkjet printable CD/DVD/BD media from your usual sources. Just be sure the surface is listed as inkjet printable.
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