Quantcast DVD to H264. To De-interlace? - digitalFAQ Forum
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07-18-2018, 01:08 AM
naripeddi naripeddi is offline
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I have about 200 movies that I captured from Satellite box (Standard Definition) using Canopus ADVC as DV-AVI and then created DVDs. The DV-AVI files are gone. All of the movies are old black & white era without action scenes.

Now that I have the DVDs (the discs), I would like to load all the movies on a hard drive, connect it to my TV directly or via NVidia Shield (Plex or Kodi) for playing.

I tried converting a couple of DVD movies to H264 using Handbrake, and the quality seems fine even after further compressing an already compressed DVD. The advantage I got was reduced file size (4.3 GB reduced to half, thus, saving space on the hard drive).

Having been satisfied with the quality of the conversions for the few movies, I would like go ahead with converting the rest of the movies. I might probably use the program Selur Hybrid for this purpose if possible, or if it is too difficult to learn, I will settle with Handbrake. I do NOT plan to get rid of the original DVDs.

My question is, should I de-interlace while converting to H264? If I should, then is Handbrake or Hybrid's de-interlace mechanism good enough or should I be doing it with something else?

I am in PAL world and I do not plan to upload these videos for online streaming. Just local playback only within the house.

Thanks for your help.

Regards
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07-18-2018, 05:41 PM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naripeddi View Post
I tried converting a couple of DVD movies to H264 using Handbrake, and the quality seems fine even after further compressing an already compressed DVD.
It would seem hardly likely that quality is "fine", particularly after 3 stage of lossy compression. It would not be possible to avoid quality loss.

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Originally Posted by naripeddi View Post
My question is, should I de-interlace while converting to H264?
If what you recorded were movies, the recordings -- or most of them -- aren't interlaced. They're hard-telecined. Are you saying that your playback system isn't good enough to handle interlace or telecine?
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07-18-2018, 10:43 PM
naripeddi naripeddi is offline
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Agreed on the lossy compression point. But visibly I do not see compression artifacts and I am ok with the quality. These are old black and white movies without any action sequences. Are you suggesting that I retain and play them in DVD format only? The only reason for me to compress to H264 is to save space on hard drive.

Hard telecine point: I do not have much idea about this. When I captured the movies, they were captured as DV-AVI and then I encoded them to DVDs myself. So, all settings (capture, encode) were for interlaced. Nowhere I saw any settings for telecine. Should I have captured with a different technique in the first place (for movies)? These are not Hollywood movies. They are Indian.

My playback system is flat screen LED TV (Full HD). It can play all these formats natively by itself when hard drive is connected via USB. Also, I have another option to play them via NVidia Shield box (using Plex or Kodi) on the same TV. I also have WDTV Live box but I am no longer using it.
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07-19-2018, 10:45 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Hollywood-style movies and the UK/European film industries shoot "movies" as purely progressive film media at 24fps; USA and Canadian movies are shot at 23.97fps progressive. In preparing these film sources for PAL TV, the originals are often just speeded up to 25fps and encoded (and broadcast) as interlaced even though they are physically progressive. Other film originals use various forms of pulldown (duplicate frames added periodically to change the frame rate to 25fps) which are progressive frames but are encoded as interlaced for broadcast use. In some instances, UK/European 24fps films use a form of pulldown (occasional duplicate-field interlaced frames) and are encoded as interlaced to achieve 25fps for broadcast. NTSC movies that have already been shot at 29.97fps or telecined with 3:2 pulldown to reach that speed are often field-blended using various formulas to reduce the number of full frames for 29.97->25fps slowdown. Many PAL movies-for-TV-series are shot as 25fps interlaced.

So there is no single answer for the number of frame structure variations you will encounter with PAL video, especially broadcast PAL video that has been recorded off air or cable. If any form of duplication, pulldown, or other telecine method has been used, deinterlacing will give you damaged results and duplicate frames. In any case, software deinterlacing is always degraded to some degree. It's something newbies do and something that has to be done for playback systems with no talent for interlace or telecine. So, if your movies already play properly, why are you going through all this trouble?
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07-19-2018, 10:58 PM
naripeddi naripeddi is offline
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Ok thank you. That's a lot of technical information which I need to digest.

Why am I going through the trouble? My only intention is to convert them to H264 (so that file size can be reduced) and I read somewhere that H264 is not good at interlaced video.

The title of my thread is whether to de-interlace or not. :-)
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07-20-2018, 03:16 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naripeddi View Post
Why am I going through the trouble? My only intention is to convert them to H264 (so that file size can be reduced) and I read somewhere that H264 is not good at interlaced video.
I understand. But note that re-encoding is a definite quality loss, so be aware that it's a lossy process. "Lossy" inherently means that degradation can't be avoided.

Quote:
Originally Posted by naripeddi View Post
The title of my thread is whether to de-interlace or not. :-)
Again, you should learn how to determine the file structure of any video. It isn't difficult, but you have to know what to look for. Improper deinterlacing or sloppy inverse telecine results in faulty playback, choppy or jerky motion, etc. It's best to allow your playback system to manage playback completely, because that's what they are designed to do.
Neuron2: How To Analyze Video Frame Structure
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07-20-2018, 04:04 AM
naripeddi naripeddi is offline
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ok thank you.

Let me go through that link and understand.
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