Quantcast Small piece of curved black plastic in Nikon lens mount? - digitalFAQ Forum
Go Back    Forum > Digital Photography > Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
12-24-2010, 04:17 AM
Sossity Sossity is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 434
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
I just recently got the nikon 1.8D 50mm lens, & I wanted to put back on the 18-105 mm lens that it came with back on, I had a little difficulty reattaching it to the body, I lifted it a little, & I see a small piece of curved black plastic inside the lens mount, I removed it, & proceeded to put the 18-105mm lens back on, I finally got it on, it screwed in with a click into place. It freaked me out a bit, I tried a snapshot with it & all seemed to work, so hope it is ok. From my camera drop, I am still very nervous about handling the camera, I feel a bit like the bull in a china shop, as my hands fumble with it.

While out in town, I had a little trouble attaching the 50mm lens & getting it to work, I placed it on & the aperture setting just kept blinking, & I could not get the shutter button to press release & take a picture. I then fiddled with it back home & realized that there is a lock that is set at f22, I did this & got it to work.

I think I would prefer to have the closest all round lens & leave it on the camera most of the time, & use the 50mm for when I shoot things like my artwork. This may be the safest with me, I dont like the idea of swapping out lenses for different purposes, especially outdoors around the beach etc when riding my bike, or in hurry to catch the moment. It increases the odds of something going wrong, & being a newbie to DSLR's this might be best.

I figure if I want minimal distortion, I could just use photoshop or something to make corrections? isn't photoshop the big fancy program that can do alot fixing like this? & if I want to get close ups, I could step back from the subject & use the zoom. In addition, if I want to capture low light I will just have to use a tripod to compensate for lower shutter speeds.

I notice the 18-105mm lens has a good range, a zoom, but with some wide angle capability. Would it work for shooting artwork?

are there any other good all round lenses for the d7000 like the 18-105mm it came with that I could use most of the time?

I notice there is the nikon 18-200mm lens. Is it much better than the 18-105mm that came with the nikon d7000?
Reply With Quote
Someday, 12:01 PM
admin's Avatar
Ads / Sponsors
 
Join Date: ∞
Posts: 42
Thanks: ∞
Thanked 42 Times in 42 Posts
  #2  
05-26-2011, 11:50 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,337
Thanked 633 Times in 452 Posts
Did you ever figure out what this was?
(I think we had answered it for you in another related D7000 post, when you first had the camera and were posting questions here a lot.)
Loose black plastic would imply something had broken, or that some loose junk had gotten into the SLR when you changed lenses.

Also, how goes the photography? It's been a few months. Getting any good shots?

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
06-01-2011, 01:45 AM
Sossity Sossity is offline
Premium Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 434
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
No, I never did, I just removed it, I think I may have even placed it in a tiny plastic bag to save in case I needed it or something, & just screwed my lens back on, everything seems to be working ok, so I am hoping it was nothing serious.

Photography is ok, I just completed an online class of Adobe photoshop 1 from my local community collge & got an A for the course.

I like how I can get instant shots one right after another, a point & shoot is slow in comparison. The only downsides are & they are minor, it is a bit bulky to carry around along with my day purse, & a little awkward to carry on my bike along with my purse. Also, the movie mode shoots in .mov format, which is a little awkward, as my family likes me to burn my movie files onto blank discs to watch a on a setop DVD player with our standard def tube TV. That is why I have like my sony cybershots for this, it shoots in .mpg format, which allows instant burning of footage to a disc. Other formats require time consuming conversions to .mpg format. It seems movie modes in cameras & camcorders are made in formats more for the web, as companies assume most people upload their video to youtube & facebook, where as in my case video is shot to watch on our older TV. Also it seems most setop DVD players do not support .mov format straight off the camera. Our DVD player is a Philips, it supports .mpg, .avi & divx.

I know the camera is not meant to be a camcorder, I like it it for it's photo capabilities, but family will not let me go away from video they still insist I shoot some when I am out & about every now & then. I am also the one who gets stuck messing with the footage as none of them are as computer savy as I am.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
06-15-2011, 05:16 PM
admin's Avatar
admin admin is offline
Site Staff | Web Development
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 4,337
Thanked 633 Times in 452 Posts
Quote:
Photography is ok, I just completed an online class of Adobe photoshop 1 from my local community collge & got an A for the course.
Good for you!

Quote:
I like how I can get instant shots one right after another, a point & shoot is slow in comparison.
Yes, this is what is known as "shutter lag". A point-and-shoot camera simply does not have good shutter speed (referring to lag, not the technical "shutter speed"). Also, the buffers are tiny, meaning you have zero chance of getting repeat frames per second. Your Nikon D7000 SLR has at least 5fps, from what I recall off-hand. That's nice.

Quote:
Also, the movie mode shoots in .mov format, which is a little awkward, as my family likes me to burn my movie files onto blank discs to watch a on a setop DVD player with our standard def tube TV. ..... It seems movie modes in cameras & camcorders are made in formats more for the web, as companies assume most people upload their video to youtube & facebook, where as in my case video is shot to watch on our older TV. Also it seems most setop DVD players do not support .mov format straight off the camera. Our DVD player is a Philips, it supports .mpg, .avi & divx. I know the camera is not meant to be a camcorder, I like it it for it's photo capabilities, but family will not let me go away from video they still insist I shoot some when I am out & about every now & then. I am also the one who gets stuck messing with the footage as none of them are as computer savy as I am.
It's not so much that video cameras are recording in formats meant for web videos (i.e., Youtube and Facebook videos), but simply that there's a shift going on right now from MJPEG and MPEG to AVCHD (H.264 MPEG-4). The file sizes are greatly increased when shooting HD with MJPEG ("AVI") and MPEG-1/MPEG-2 formats, and that causes issues with FAT32 used on memory cards, as well as RAM buffers on-camera. The Nikon D3s, for example, uses MJPEG for 720p24 video, which limits it to a somewhat lousy 5 minutes max time per clip. MJPEG is great for editing, not so great for file size. Your D7000, on the other hand, shoots AVCHD, which is how/why you can get 20 minutes per clip at 1080p24. H.264 is compressed quite a bit more. The trade-off, however, is that H.264 was never really meant as a "shooting format", so it can be harder to edit on a computer. It's yet another reason a lot of editors use intermediary transcode formats like Apple ProRes or Cineform. The most recent versions of Adobe Premiere support AVCHD natively, though it still lags quite a bit when trying to preview your editing work, due to the source compression.

The Quicktime container is Apple proprietary technology, and is probably why the "extra featre" type DVD players don't want to mess with it. The "AVI" files support by Philips, for example, are really Divx/Xvid MPEG-4 files in an AVI wrapper. MPEG-4 is decently supported in popular and/or open-source containers like AVI, MP4 and MKV -- the ones commonly supported by DVD players with added file playing features.

If your DVD player supports downscaling of 1080p24, and also support MP4 or MKV files, then you may be able to simply re-wrap the files. There's several programs on Mac that can do this. (If you want to learn how, let us know, and we'll create a guide for this process. It's a very quick process, no encoding of video is necessary. Just dump the files to the Mac, re-wrap, and then upload to your flash drive or blank DVD for viewing.) I'd need to know exact model number of your DVD player, to know if it can support 1080p24 MKV or MP4 files, and assuming the info is in an online manual. If you still have the manual, you may be able to look on your own for supported file types.

Another option is to buy a better player, like the very small and inexpensive WDTV: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B003O85A96
Those cost all of about $65 + free shipping, and work well as "media center" players.

- Did this site help you? Then upgrade to Premium Member and show your support!
- Also: Like Us on Facebook for special DVD/Blu-ray news and deals!
Reply With Quote
Reply




Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Photo lens attachment for Nikon 50mm lens on Nikon D7000 Sossity Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting 3 12-06-2010 03:44 AM
Nikon 50mm lens on eBay a good buy? Or not? Sossity Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting 5 11-21-2010 12:18 AM
What lens to use for DSLR like Nikon D7000 while bike riding? Room for only one lens. Sossity Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting 4 11-15-2010 05:25 PM
Comparing Nikon vs Canon, lens and prices? Which is best dSLR? admin Photo Cameras: Buying & Shooting 0 10-18-2009 06:00 PM

Thread Tools



 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:29 PM