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12-25-2008, 12:31 PM
beavereater beavereater is offline
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Not sure this term exists or not...I use it as a way to express the following "Taking a series of pictures that tells a story." I don't know if that's something I picked up somewhere or if there's another term used BUT I want to do this...I made this image earlier this year and thought it would be a good "Vengeful get the bad guy that killed my family" kinda story...
Mean_Beaver.jpg



Last edited by beavereater; 12-25-2008 at 12:45 PM.
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  #2  
12-25-2008, 12:41 PM
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Looks like I need a vB plugin that limits image sizes to a certain width. Hmmm....

Anyway, what you want to do has a very easy name: "photo story". Yes, it's really that easy. Another term is "photo essay", but I find it to be less used than "photo story".

It's a photojournalism concept, one that I've used for many years. I've shot quite a few photo stories in the past.

There are several key factors that go into a good photo story. The three most important ones are:
  • Overall shot -- you need an image that, taken alone, could tell a lot of the story by itself. It's the main shot. it often serves as the "page 1" teaser (usually in the masthead, or other promotional space) that goes to the full photo story page, be it single page or a double-truck (both pages on a single broadsheet).
  • Closing shot -- something that is the definitive end of the story, be it a sunset, people leaving, the final action, etc
  • The detail shot -- this is a close-up on an object, maybe a body part, but usually an object. If it were a story on war, it might be a close-up of a grenade. If it were sports (a basketball tournament, for example), it might be a close-up of a ball going through the hoop. It's a little something that makes it less of a group of images.
More shots to consider:
  • The setting, but empty. Sometimes in a magazine like National Geographic, you'll see stories about people, but they'll have one shot of scenery only, to take in the environment alone. It re-enforces the importance of the environment, when needed.
A good story is usually about 6-8 images in size, rarely more than 9-10. It's good to shoot at least 15-20 shots, and then edit down to the winners. Choosing the shots should be a very tough decision, it should not be easy. Easy means you didn't get enough good images, or you didn't tell the story well enough.

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  #3  
12-25-2008, 12:46 PM
beavereater beavereater is offline
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Width issue solved
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  #4  
12-25-2008, 12:49 PM
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I still might look for one that caps at ~800px in-forum-page and then does a lightbox to full screen in the z-layer window.

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