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  #1  
03-21-2011, 05:01 AM
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lordsmurf lordsmurf is online now
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continued from email...
For quick responses, ask in the forum, otherwise I may not answer for weeks.

Quote:
right, i'm a complete noob at this, so treat me like the dunce of the class.
i've got a "ts" file.
i've no idea what type of stream it is - ie is it mpeg2, h264 etc?
so 1st Q: how do i find out what type of transport stream it is? what's
the best tool?
next, when i playback the file, through vlc, i notice "combing".
so 2nd Q: how do i remove this? what tool/s do i need to remove the
combing? or do i just have to live with it?
(side Q: what causes combing?)
3rd Q: how do i find out the bitrate of the ts? what tool do i use?
I'll answer this piece by piece...

Quote:
i've got a "ts" file.
i've no idea what type of stream it is - ie is it mpeg2, h264 etc?
so 1st Q: how do i find out what type of transport stream it is? what's
the best tool?
Use Mediainfo on Windows, Mac or Linux: http://mediainfo.sourceforge.net/en
Gspot is a favorite codec analysis tool, but it's gotten to be much too dated for analysing files like MKV, H.264 or TS. Or at least with any degree of speed or accuracy. I just finished analysing MXF files with Mediainfo on a Mac, and it was accurate -- unlike Gspot.

Quote:
next, when i playback the file, through vlc, i notice "combing".
so 2nd Q: how do i remove this? what tool/s do i need to remove the
combing? or do i just have to live with it?
(side Q: what causes combing?)
Combing is what interlace looks like when viewed on a progressive display.

Interlace was an invention of television engineers at least 75 years ago. It was a trick to show more frames of video, but without consuming more bandwidth. Instead of somewhat jerky 15 fps, interlacing put it at 30fps. Color put it at 29.97, due to yet another cheat/heck to make it work. In Europe, power was based off 50hz instead of 60hz, so it was 25fps. No cheat needed, because PAL color is/was different from NTSC color. (These days, it's all YUV data, no difference between PAL and NTSC in the digital era.)

Anyway, that's why you see it.

The best solution to "remove" it is to simply use a player that deinterlaces. Watched on an older tube TV, you'll see nothing unusual. HDTVs have hardware deinterlacers, so again, nothing looks odd. The only reason you'd want to ever deinterlace is if you're converting for streaming, such as Youtube. But for simple watching, use a player like VLC or GOM, and then simply enable one of the de-interlace filters.

Quote:
3rd Q: how do i find out the bitrate of the ts? what tool do i use?
Mediainfo should have that info, too.

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  #2  
03-21-2011, 06:30 AM
manthing manthing is offline
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as you suggested, a better media player is probably the first thing to try.
cheers.
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