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03-13-2010, 06:27 AM
robjv1 robjv1 is offline
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I would certainly like to see that in action. How much did those run at the time? I wonder if I could find one on Craigslist.

I haven't seen VHS stuff on a Sony LCD, but I can't say that I've been pleased with VHS quality stuff on the other LCD TVs I've seen, but it's been a limited selection. I hope someday something lighter than 200lbs comes along that displays my stuff just as well, but until then I suppose I'll lug my HD CRT around
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03-13-2010, 07:04 AM
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Moved this topic to it's own thread...

At their peak, about $2500, down to about $1500 by end-of-life of the product line. The best ones were the final ones, the KDS-50A3000 (50"), KDS-55A3000 (55") or the KDS-60A3000 (60"). It was such a good model, that even online reviews tended to be all 5 star (our of 5), 10/10, A+, Excellent, etc. It's not often that idiots and perfectionists alike agree on something, but this was one of those rare items that achieved it.

These were NOT "LCD" sets, but projection. However, it's not the "projection" you're thinking of, either. This was a very specialized tech, Sony-proprietary "SXRD" technology, which was based on the Intel LCoS chips -- sort of like an LCD, sort of. A tiny LCD inside the set had light projected through it to show the large image. The benefit was a lightweight set with great color, and a low cost. The ONLY really bad thing was a it could end up with bad pixels just like any LCD.

It was only 18" thick at the base, and it tapered up to just a few inches thick at top. Weight-wise, it wasn't too bad at all, two people could handle it with no problem -- or one very 'roided up gorilla of a man probably could handle it fine, too.

Most HD CRTs suffer from terrible geometric distortions. I think it was due to the products being based off SD CRTs, including the 4:3 aspect.

Another excellent TV were the Sharp EDTV -- extended definition 4:3 LCDs. These were popular around 2005-2007, and I have one of these too. It's a great set, and an LCD that doesn't suffer from the common "pixel look" you see so often on LCD sets. It also comes with a number of filters, for both quality and color management.

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03-13-2010, 06:02 PM
robjv1 robjv1 is offline
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Sounds great! I wish I had been in the market for a TV when they were out.

Yeah, the geometry on HD CRTs can be hard to get right and in some cases getting them perfect is impossible. I've been lucky with both of my sets, although one has a geometry problem in the over-scan area (but no big deal for the obvious reasons).

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Most HD CRTs suffer from terrible geometric distortions. I think it was due to the products being based off SD CRTs, including the 4:3 aspect.
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