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  #1  
07-06-2021, 03:25 AM
ZetaSuprema ZetaSuprema is offline
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Hello! I am finalizing the final points for the process of building a closet with crystals where to put all my collection, the thing is, since time does not pass in vain, some boxes and discs are somewhat dirty, since the air in the case when ventilating Well, even if you remove the dust, always find a way to get them dirty

So, i was looking a safe option to clean the CD / DVD / Bluray cases and discs, and basically i have 3 options: Distilled water, isopropyl alcohol from 91% to 99% (with or without water) or a mix of distilled water and ethanol 96

I have been searching info and apparently, the Isopropyl it's not recommendable for polycarbonate discs, because it's can make cracks, in labs use ethanol for Polycarbonate parts due to this (Source: https://labproinc.com/blogs/chemical...ics-in-the-lab)

But, some studies of the media (Source: https://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/sec6/) recommended and i have been looking the compatibility charts of the plastics and it's indicates that Ethanol is "good" but water and isopropyl is "Excellent", so... right now i am a little confused of what could be the safest option, not only for polycarbonate, if not in case it could damage the adhesive or corrode metal that is inside the discs where they have more deep scratches (i have some disks sticky in the edge due to grease of the time i suppose)

So... what in your experience it's the safest option for clean:

-The external part of the case
-The internal part of the case
-The disc back and the edges (i don't think that clean the label is a good idea)

My personal thoughts is to use just distilled water for the less dirty for all (case and disc), and a mix of Alcohol 96 with distilled water for the rest, even though it may leave an oily residue, but I'm afraid it might break down the adhesive of discs, it won't evaporate fast enough to be safe or became "flammable" due to the residue

About the paper cover... if anyone could tell me a safe method to clean it, i would be appreciated, due to that second hand objects it's a complete mess in that aspect, my thought is to use very little of distilled water on a microfiber cloth (if someone could indicate what to use to avoid fluff especially in records it would be great)

In other order of things... what do you think about:

1. Polishing optical discs: Is it a good idea or does it make problems worse in the long run?

2. Polybags for protection of cases and discs

About the first, I mention it because I have some somewhat scratched discs and I don't know if it would be recommended, I have seen a plastic polish that is normally used to remove scratches from CD cases (I do not know if it works for DVD, if someone could confirm it, I would be interested), but I don't know how it will work on the discs, although my question was more about shop polishing machines or those sold for home

About the second... i personally i don't a big fan of that, i used ZIP bags for some steelbooks and i found a bad surprise with some of them (rusted away and paint chipped), so i usually buy PET plastic case to protect them, but are quite expensive for normal plastic cases, so i just order for steelbooks.

Even so it recommended? Any other cheaper option? To protect from scratches or it's bad if it's not PET due to condensation?

Finally, if anyone how to "restore" a rusted steelbook, i am all heard I'm all ears, i am thinking in use WD-40 with isopropyl, clean the rust with a fiber glass pen and paint with transparent paint the damage.

Anyone know if isopropyl/ethanol damage the paint further of the steelbooks? Distelled water could be a option?

I just wondered to used for the plastic internal size of the case, and dry it conscientiously

Sorry if it's too long, but it is a summary of what I have seen in these months and what has me a bit more thoughtful lately, due that i am a little noob on all of this, first of all, thanks to Lordsmuf for the resolution of doubts in previous posts, and I would appreciate any help in this post too, a greeting and have a good day
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  #2  
07-06-2021, 04:52 AM
BarryTheCrab BarryTheCrab is online now
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You seem very familiar, do I know you from somewhere here?
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  #3  
07-06-2021, 06:07 AM
ZetaSuprema ZetaSuprema is offline
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I don't think so, i have done 2 post about optical media, but i mainly have talked with Lordsmurf due to he has large experience in that area
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  #4  
07-06-2021, 10:48 PM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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To clean your discs, lukewarm water, distilled if you want, with a couple of drops of dish detergent. Pat, don't rub with a microfiber cloth, not towel which can leave lint.

Never polish a disc unless you have to. All polishes are abrasive and will add micro scratches. If you're having a problem playing a disc, you can have it buffed, which removes a layer of the polycarbonate layer. Depending on how deep the scratches are, you may have one only chance to buff a disc before you take off too much

According to lordsmurf, there are only one or two buffing machines that can actually make a disc better than worse. Any machine worth using is hundreds of dollars or more.

For the inserts, compressed air and a fine hair (camel hair?) brush. Think cleaning a photo or camera lens. No matter what you use to rub the surface, you'll likely push dust particles into the surface, causing scratches that are worse than the dust itself.

As for plastic bags, read the now thankfully banned gamemaniaco's endless threads about trying to preserve his precious
discs. lordsmurf has told him many, many, many times that plastic traps moisture, as you've found out.

If you're trying to preserve your cases and discs thinking that someday they'll become ultra rare collectors items, it's unlikely to happen. Videos are moving heavily to streaming only and your Super Special Limited Edition Steelbox editions will be surpassed by higher quality remastered versions that will be what's in demand, not the physical disc or box it came in.

The reason old videogames are collectible, other than those just buying to speculate, is because the hardware, consoles and controllers can't be perfectly emulated. A while ago, I paid $80 for a limited edition Japanese SuperNES controller for my Wii because there is nothing that perfectly matches what I remembered from the past. The video emulation of SuperNES games on the Wii is good enough for me, but I needed that feel of a real controller. I paid dearly for it and don't regret the purchase one bit!
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  #5  
07-06-2021, 11:43 PM
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For actual grime, tiny drop of non-fancy dish soap, with water, on a cotton cloth rag. Never paper towels, napkins, as those are made from trees, and you're essentially rubbing the disc with fine tree bark.

Never polish unless needed. And "needed" = remove deep scratches, really nothing else. The machine mentioned is the RTI DisChek.

I store comic books in polybags. I always forget which poly it is, there are several (propyl, ethyl, etc). I'd never store discs that way.

Isopropyl (IPA) of 90%+ doesn't damage discs. It evaporates too fast. You'll get more damage with the removal rags, pressures, and motions. That "lab" site doesn't mention optical media, and it seems to mostly just be a marketing blog to sell stuff anyway, disregard. CLIR is correct.

- Did my advice help you? Then become a Premium Member and support this site.
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  #6  
07-07-2021, 01:00 AM
ZetaSuprema ZetaSuprema is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
To clean your discs, lukewarm water, distilled if you want, with a couple of drops of dish detergent. Pat, don't rub with a microfiber cloth, not towel which can leave lint.

Never polish a disc unless you have to. All polishes are abrasive and will add micro scratches. If you're having a problem playing a disc, you can have it buffed, which removes a layer of the polycarbonate layer. Depending on how deep the scratches are, you may have one only chance to buff a disc before you take off too much

According to lordsmurf, there are only one or two buffing machines that can actually make a disc better than worse. Any machine worth using is hundreds of dollars or more.

For the inserts, compressed air and a fine hair (camel hair?) brush. Think cleaning a photo or camera lens. No matter what you use to rub the surface, you'll likely push dust particles into the surface, causing scratches that are worse than the dust itself.

As for plastic bags, read the now thankfully banned gamemaniaco's endless threads about trying to preserve his precious
discs. lordsmurf has told him many, many, many times that plastic traps moisture, as you've found out.

If you're trying to preserve your cases and discs thinking that someday they'll become ultra rare collectors items, it's unlikely to happen. Videos are moving heavily to streaming only and your Super Special Limited Edition Steelbox editions will be surpassed by higher quality remastered versions that will be what's in demand, not the physical disc or box it came in.

The reason old videogames are collectible, other than those just buying to speculate, is because the hardware, consoles and controllers can't be perfectly emulated. A while ago, I paid $80 for a limited edition Japanese SuperNES controller for my Wii because there is nothing that perfectly matches what I remembered from the past. The video emulation of SuperNES games on the Wii is good enough for me, but I needed that feel of a real controller. I paid dearly for it and don't regret the purchase one bit!
Thanks for the answer

I would investigate the fine hair brush, but yes, it's has to be carefull with the plastic paper, very fragile

Yes, the plastic bags need to be open at leats a bit to let moinsture out, that's because PET rigid plastic case are good for steelbooks apparently, but are expensive and that's because DVD cases have some hole in the paper insert, all have some explanation apparently

The preservation of stuff more than valuable sense (that it is, depends of the object of course, but always the original media would be supperior to a emulated, that's why like you pointed that the Super NES controller) it's for personal satisfaction and having your own availability of (you've gotten the right) video games, I'm not a big fan of the cloud path or DRM, although I understand that it is accessibility and is always welcome, but in the long term, I think having your own access wins more than immediate accessibility
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  #7  
07-07-2021, 01:16 AM
ZetaSuprema ZetaSuprema is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsmurf View Post
For actual grime, tiny drop of non-fancy dish soap, with water, on a cotton cloth rag. Never paper towels, napkins, as those are made from trees, and you're essentially rubbing the disc with fine tree bark.

Never polish unless needed. And "needed" = remove deep scratches, really nothing else. The machine mentioned is the RTI DisChek.

I store comic books in polybags. I always forget which poly it is, there are several (propyl, ethyl, etc). I'd never store discs that way.

Isopropyl (IPA) of 90%+ doesn't damage discs. It evaporates too fast. You'll get more damage with the removal rags, pressures, and motions. That "lab" site doesn't mention optical media, and it seems to mostly just be a marketing blog to sell stuff anyway, disregard. CLIR is correct.
Thanks for the answer

I am not a big fan of dish soap, basically because includes several chemicals in different brand products, that's why i am more fan of the mix of water and alcohol, the alarm with isopropyl was because a user advice me, but it's sounds me a little excesive, maybe if you dip in isopropyl, but a little i don't think it can damage

My main fear is the adhesive of discs, it's know that glue (and adhesive can be removed with alcohol) so... could be a mix of water and ethanol/isopropyl a problem?

CLIR indicates isopropyl and methanol, i understand that ethanol is valid too because it's similar to methanol, maybe (?)

About resurface machine... i have research the machine and it's out of stock apparently, and i have seen 1 at 3.000$ that's makes me jump from my chair, i looked some time one but idk if it's works, it's the SFJ Easy Pro, compatible with Bluray discs apparently, that's the second machine that's works?

I don't have many discs scratched, just second hand, some really old due to i wasn't really carefull when i was more young and some that are in cheap cases, anyone knows what cases are good to store? What brand or specific material name is used for commercial one cases?

Basically the cheap have a interior texture rough that when you moves your discs inside it's scratches as ***** it's makes a vertical line in a Bluray, i just say that, that's why i am interested in a case replacement
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  #8  
07-07-2021, 04:11 AM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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It would take more than a few seconds of exposure to alcohol the break down the adhesive used to seal a disc. Maybe if you soaked your discs for months in 100% alcohol, you'd see some microscopic effect. In addition, alcohol, especially high percent is a poor cleaner of non-greasy grime. On the other hand, dish detergent and soap works well on removing grease, breaking it own. If you're so concerned about the chemicals, use natural soap.

As for cases...*SIGH*...again, read gamemaniaco's nearly eight years of endless posts, he posted every possible, inane, insane question about case, damage to and storage of discs possible.

Be aware that gamey was finally banned because of his incessant posts, so thoroughly read and absorb everything he posted before asking anything more about how to protect your discs.
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  #9  
07-07-2021, 04:23 AM
lingyi lingyi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryTheCrab View Post
You seem very familiar, do I know you from somewhere here?
Just looked at the OP's history and if you've been on Reddit Datahoarder, he/she's posted there too about discs "delaminating" with the evidence being the excess glue being squeezed out during the manufacturing process and the glue somehow being affected by playing in a PS4.

At first I thought it was gamey, but his/her writing is too clear and he/she was around at Datahoarder for a while before coming here asking the same Q's and getting the same answers. It's not delamination and the glue isn't breaking down.

Then again..."A room without windows would be bad too, the humidity concentrated on a room could produce mold grow, and sunlight prevents mold, ventilation is needed" Makes you go hmmm... Maybe we've been played for nearly 8 years after all!

Edit: This is giving me chills. What are the odds?

"Talking about this, i usually live at a place at 18C in winter and 28C on summer with 60% of middle term all the year, with the door of the room closed so and at night humidity rises 69% at much so... could be this humidity a danger?

Basically ask this to find a dehumidifier that turn on and turn off when reach at for example 40/50% and it's silent if i have to turn in on at night, or could safe to leave the door open while I sleep even if the humidity rises to 69% during the hours of sleep?"

Last edited by lingyi; 07-07-2021 at 04:49 AM.
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  #10  
07-07-2021, 06:22 AM
ZetaSuprema ZetaSuprema is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
Just looked at the OP's history and if you've been on Reddit Datahoarder, he/she's posted there too about discs "delaminating" with the evidence being the excess glue being squeezed out during the manufacturing process and the glue somehow being affected by playing in a PS4.

At first I thought it was gamey, but his/her writing is too clear and he/she was around at Datahoarder for a while before coming here asking the same Q's and getting the same answers. It's not delamination and the glue isn't breaking down.

Then again..."A room without windows would be bad too, the humidity concentrated on a room could produce mold grow, and sunlight prevents mold, ventilation is needed" Makes you go hmmm... Maybe we've been played for nearly 8 years after all!

Edit: This is giving me chills. What are the odds?

"Talking about this, i usually live at a place at 18C in winter and 28C on summer with 60% of middle term all the year, with the door of the room closed so and at night humidity rises 69% at much so... could be this humidity a danger?

Basically ask this to find a dehumidifier that turn on and turn off when reach at for example 40/50% and it's silent if i have to turn in on at night, or could safe to leave the door open while I sleep even if the humidity rises to 69% during the hours of sleep?"
If not removes grease... well, i hope that water removes the "sticky" sensation, if not, i take note about the pure soap

Yep, i asked the same questions in Datahoarded, i like to have several opinions on the same topic and then draw my own conclusions

And not, i am not "gamemaniaco", but it don't pretend be him, my idea is ask about some strangeness that I am finding or things too specific about optical media to have them in the best possible way, as you said, I speak too clearly, unless I had multiple personality, it wouldn't make sense, don't you think?

And about the windows, yep, i am "Team Windows", maybe the optimal is a ventilation without them with small openings to the outside, but we do not live in an ideal world and the room where I have the discs is where I sleep and spend most of the time, and it really different when it is completely closed compared to when you ventilate, the house "breathes", especially in summer

And about dehumidifier... being the main enemy of the optimal media (and practically almost everything electronic) the truth is that I have it under surveillance, but I hope that with the maintenance that I plan to do and some improvements, the situation improves notably, but yes, reach the ideal conditions in a house, unless you are rich, it's really impossible, and put a deshumidifier at night maybe it's silly, i don't have to be I don't have to be so fussy about numbers, I admit it, but due that in winter somedays it's really humid during the day, i think that the invest worth it

My biggest problem is the delamination and pinholes, but the first seems that it is not so common and the second I talk to Lordsmurf and it is nothing of "disc rot" apparently, nonsense panic at the internet I suppose, although I will see how it evolves because there are always bad discs (and cardtridges, and everything you can imagine i suppose)
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  #11  
06-07-2023, 02:46 PM
TCMullet TCMullet is offline
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What's wrong with Novus #2 for polishing LDs??? I thought it was MEANT for that.
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