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  #1  
01-23-2016, 07:59 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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I would like some advice on transferring my old VHS tapes to a format on my hard drives that makes the most sense for future needs. I will also be transferring Digital 8 tapes to my hard drives. I would like to focus primarily on transferring the VHS tapes first, and then I will worry about the Digital 8 tapes.

I don't have a video background but I am technical, so if possible, spell out acronyms or give details the first time when explaining new concepts or giving advice as I am in the process of learning. Thanks.

I own the following video cameras:

Panasonic PV-330D (November 1987) video camcorder.

This is the video camcorder that was used to record all my VHS home movies.

Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 Video Camera recorder - broken but D/A pass-through still works

This was the first Digital 8 camera that I owned and recorded 50% of my Digital 8 videos,

The tape transport in the Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 malfunctioned but the Analog-to-digital pass-through still works.

Analog-to-digital pass-through conversion allows analog video to pass through the Audio/Video (A/V) or S-Video input jacks of a digital camcorder and then be output via the i.LINKŪ port as digital video to a computer.

https://us.en.kb.sony.com/app/answer...log-to-digital

Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-350 Video Camera recorder

This is the replacement Video Camera recorder for the Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 (above).

I only have the Sonyy Digital 8 DVR TRV-350 to play my Digital 8 tapes.

I own the following VCR machines:

Panasonic PV-V4523S
Sharp VC-H812U
Sony SVO-2000

I realize that it is very unlikely that anyone will approve of my owning or using the Panasonic or Sharp VCR to playback VHS tapes to capture the analog video to a digital format. Perhaps the Sony SVO-2000 is acceptable. Regardless the main concern is whether any of them suffice to playback the tapes during the transfer process or if it is an absolute must to buy a new VCR and which one would be available, etc. Also, these are VHS tapes with only 240 horizontal lines and not formatted as S-VHS format (420 lines), which means I cannot use S-Video outputs. But, I read on Digital FAQ that it is still better to play VHS tapes on a S-VHS VCR machines "because they come with many embedded filters and enhancers." But can I also use a regular VHS VCR without those embedded filters and enhancers but get those same benefits externally through other hardware or software?

Read more: http://www.digitalfaq.com/guides/vid...#ixzz3y7NP8ACH.

Would I be better off to buy a new VCR with an internal TBC or use my existing VCRs (perhaps the Sony SVO-2000) and an external TBC?

I own the following computer:

Mid-2010 iMac.

Processor: 2.93 GHz Intel Core i7; Memory: 8 GB 1333 MHz DDR3; Graphics: ATI Radeon HD 5750 1024 MB; OS X Yosemite: version 10.10.3 (14D136)

The FireWire port on the iMac mid-2010 is FireWire 800. It has a 9-pin connector.

iMac comes with Bootcamp but I also purchased Parallels Desktop 10. I am currently running version 10.1.1 (28614) and Windows 7 32-bit.

I currently have no plans to upgrade to OS X El Capitan (10.11). Doing so would require upgrading Parallels Desktop too.

Please keep in mind that the iMac does not allow for expansion slots or cards like most PCs.

I will need help understanding what are the right choices. Like I said earlier, I am new to this an d so I won't necessary know all the right things to ask and may have misunderstandings as to how to correctly to complete the process. I guess the main thing is finding out what initial codec and format should be used to capture or transfer video from my tapes and the equipment and software required to make it happen.

One recommendation for capturing analog video on VHS tapes is DV video in an AVI format. How much space does that take up compared to other methods and what about ease in editing, etc.?

It sounds like some recommend the ATI All in Wonder card to capture video, but since the iMac does not have expansion slots, that does not sound like an option for me. What hardware do you recommend to capture the video from my VHS tapes?

There are mixed opinions about using the Canopus ADVC 110 to convert video to DV-AVI. As stated in this forum: "The largest gripe about this device is the codec itself. DV is almost older than I am and by compression standards very outdated for today's needs.DV is lossy, meaning it uses intra-frame compression to reduce file size, but this compression is not as heavy as MPEG-2 or H.264."

Read more: Canopus ADVC 110 Review (2014)

DV uses lossy compression of video while audio is stored uncompressed. So, should DV be used and which codec should be used for DV?

Also, should I purchase an external AVT-8710/TBC-1000 TBC to further improve quality?

Maybe someone could lay out a simple plan for me to archive my old VHS tapes using my existing equipment or new purchases.

Thanks.
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  #2  
01-25-2016, 09:59 AM
msgohan msgohan is offline
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There's a lot to go through in your post. I would recommend you try using what you have now to capture a tape and see what you think of the results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
DV video in an AVI format. How much space does that take up compared to other methods and what about ease in editing, etc.?
Have you captured anything from your Digital8 camcorder yet? That's DV. It would be in MOV rather than AVI container if you use the Mac OS, but that makes no difference.

Quote:
DV uses lossy compression of video while audio is stored uncompressed. So, should DV be used
This is a whole can of worms. You can see one of the debates on this topic in the thread you linked. Please don't make us do this again.

Quote:
and which codec should be used for DV?
The hardware is doing the compression, so for the first half of "codec" you're locked into whatever chip it uses. On the decompression side, it makes no difference as long as chroma interpolation is correctly handled. On Windows, Cedocida is the best decompressor: it's free and highly configurable with good defaults.

You already have a Digital8 camcorder that takes analog input and converts it to DV. That's all the ADVC 110 does, so there's almost no advantage to buying one in your case even if you decide that you want to stick with DV. The only thing I can think of is that because neither offers proc amp controls, one of them may happen to offer better levels for certain tapes. But I'd say this would be better handled by an actual proc amp.
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01-25-2016, 04:06 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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As far as transferring my VHS tapes, should the video be captured as DV using my Sony DCR TRV330? Or would I get a better DV encoding (chipset) using a different device, such as the Grass Valley ADVC110 or 300? Or should I employ capturing in different codec besides DV? Does the Grassy Valley ADVC100 or 300 output the same DV as the Sony camera or is it different? I also noticed that the ADVC300 has a processing amplifier built into it, but no TBC. I am wondering if I should be coming out of my VCR into the Grass Valley AVT 8710 (but it too has a processing amp) to utilize the TBC, and then into the ADVC100 or 300 to produce the DV codec.

I have owned my Sony camera since around 2012. Reading Wikipedia, it differentiates between baseline DV and its variants. After Panasonic came out with DVPRO, Sony responded with DVCAM. Do I assume that my camera is recording in DVCAM then? Do I assume that it is producing 4:1:1 subsampling? Do I care if the sampling is 4:1:1 when transferring my VHS tapes to DV? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DV

"DV uses lossy compression of video while audio is stored uncompressed.[2] An intraframe video compression scheme is used to compress video on a frame-by-frame basis with the discrete cosine transform (DCT)."

"Prior to the DCT compression stage, chroma subsampling is applied to the source video in order to reduce the amount of data to be compressed. Baseline DV uses 4:1:1 subsampling in its 60 Hz variant ..."

"The audio, video, and metadata are packaged into 80-byte Digital Interface Format (DIF) blocks which are multiplexed into a 150-block sequence. DIF blocks are the basic units of DV streams and can be stored as computer files in raw form or wrapped in such file formats as Audio Video Interleave (AVI), QuickTime (QT) and Material Exchange Format (MXF)."

"In 1996 Sony responded with its own professional version of DV called DVCAM."
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01-25-2016, 04:06 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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I would also like to know what is the recommended software to run on my iMac to capture DV or a different choice for another codec/format, etc. When I tried capturing my VHS tapes through my Sony DCR TRV330 with Roxio Toast 12 Titanium it only displayed the video but would not record it.

Last edited by RDM56; 01-25-2016 at 04:14 PM. Reason: Duplicate reply
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01-25-2016, 05:46 PM
msgohan msgohan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
As far as transferring my VHS tapes, should the video be captured as DV using my Sony DCR TRV330? Or would I get a better DV encoding (chipset) using a different device, such as the Grass Valley ADVC110 or 300?
You can tell me how you think Sony's encoder stacks up.

Quote:
Or should I employ capturing in different codec besides DV?
This is the can of worms again.

Quote:
Does the Grassy Valley ADVC100 or 300 output the same DV as the Sony camera or is it different?
Each device will have some differences due to different ADC and hardware encoder chips.

Quote:
I also noticed that the ADVC300 has a processing amplifier built into it, but no TBC.
It claims to have a TBC but it doesn't do much, if anything, and apparently makes the picture worse at times. It can't be disabled.

Quote:
I am wondering if I should be coming out of my VCR into the Grass Valley AVT 8710 (but it too has a processing amp) to utilize the TBC, and then into the ADVC100 or 300 to produce the DV codec.
The AVT-8710 isn't by Grass Valley. The AVT-8710 isn't a line TBC, and people claim that you don't need a full-frame TBC when using an ADVC100.

Quote:
After Panasonic came out with DVPRO, Sony responded with DVCAM. Do I assume that my camera is recording in DVCAM then?
No. The difference between Digital8, MiniDV, and DVCAM is solely in the type and size of cassette that they are recorded onto. Your Digital8 is Digital8, not DVCAM, and both record to the DV data format.

Quote:
Do I assume that it is producing 4:1:1 subsampling? Do I care if the sampling is 4:1:1 when transferring my VHS tapes to DV? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DV
Yes, it is. No, you shouldn't.*

*Can of worms alert! See earlier in the linked thread where Lordsmurf and I went back and forth on this topic.
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  #6  
01-26-2016, 01:28 PM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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Good coverage and summary, msgohan.

I noticed a neglected point or two from the original post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
these are VHS tapes with only 240 horizontal lines and not formatted as S-VHS format (420 lines), which means I cannot use S-Video outputs.
I think you confuse SVHS and s-video. SVHS is a tape format. s-video is a type of signal transmission and cable. The two are not related. s-video can be used to transmit analog signals from VHS, SVHS, VHS-C, DVD players, and the analog outputs of set top boxes and a/v receivers, among other things. s-video can't carry HD signals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
But, I read on Digital FAQ that it is still better to play VHS tapes on a S-VHS VCR machines "because they come with many embedded filters and enhancers." But can I also use a regular VHS VCR without those embedded filters and enhancers but get those same benefits externally through other hardware or software?
No. If without builtin enhancers, you can use post-processing filters. But the line tbc in prosumer players is an absolute essential for tape. A few legacy DVDR's can be used as pass-thru devices for tbc, but by and large the line tbc's in high-end vcr's are better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
Would I be better off to buy a new VCR with an internal TBC or use my existing VCRs (perhaps the Sony SVO-2000) and an external TBC?
No, sorry. VCR tbc's are active only during tape play. They can't be used as external tbc's.
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  #7  
01-26-2016, 02:35 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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I read a previous Digital FAQ article about the differences between line and external TBC that was very informative. It was titled: "What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes"

What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes

Based on a previous thread, it sounds like you need both types of TBC to do the best job of digitizing VHS tapes for the following group discussion:

I read that your work flow include systematically a Line TBC and Full Frame TBC.

It has to. Two TBCs for two separate tasks.
- The line TBC is for cleaning the image quality.
- The external full frame TBC / frame sync is for correcting signal problems.

Read more: Video conversion: Line TBC vs Full Frame TBC

Reading one of the articles on Digital FAQ:

"A standalone TBC will generally not clean up visual image quality, such as removing chroma noise or suppressing visual distortions (excluding mild vertical jitter/vibration). Clean-up features of this nature are generally found only in high-grade modern broadcast TBCs that price well into the 4-digit range, from companies such as Leitch or For.A. For example, the For.A FA-128 for $1700."

What is a TBC? Time Base Correction for Videotapes

But when I clicked on the B&H Photo Video link for the For.A FA-128 Analog Frame Sync/TBC 14-Bit B&H # FOFA128 MFR # FA-128 to learn more, it was no longer available.

However, the AVToolbox AVT-8710 was recommended as a good standalone TBC, although it was noted that it may not clean up the image. Yet, the AVToolbox AVT-8710 has many good reviews about customers seeing a noticeable improvement in the quality of the image. Here is just one review.

"I recently started converting my old VHS tapes to DVD. I have a capture device and an older model VCR. When using just the VCR, the 25 year old home movies did not have a very good picture. I called B&H, and they were very helpful on the AVT-8710 Time Base Corrector. I purchased one, and all I can say is WOW. It greatly cleaned my video up for conversion. I did make some adjustments, but it really did well. After using the AVT-8710, I did a before and after comparison on the video and it made a huge difference in the video. This is a great product if you are wanting to convert your old analog VHS tapes to DVD. In my opinion, this is the solution. I highly recommend the AVT-8710 and B&H Photo for all your needs!"

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...html/AVAVT8710

Based on what I have been reading on Digital FAQ then, it sounds like the best advice for the best quality images during conversion of VHS tapes is to play the tapes in a VCR with a quality line TBC first (and stable transport deck), then feed the VCR outputs to an external TBC like the AVToolbox AVT-8710, and then feed the output of the external TBC to an A/D capture device to digitize the analog video signal.

In my case, I already mentioned owning a Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 Video Camera recorder that comes with a line TBC and Analog-to-digital pass-through.

I have several VCRs, but none that I know to be high quality, except perhaps the Sony SVO-2000. It comes with BNC connectors which you don't typically see on lower end VCRs.

My thoughts are to first see what results I can get using my VCRs and the Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 to capture DV straight to my iMac. However, in the past this method has not worked for me when trying to capture using Roxio toast 12 Titanium. If I recall correctly, I also tried importing directly into iMovie. However, the video appeared but the record button was disabled.

I later managed to capture video from my VCR by using a Roxio Video Capture device, but this not my preferred choice since it doesn't allow me to really clean up the video signal or provide better choices. I am pretty sure this forum would frown heavily on using Roxio Video Capture.

So, what software for my iMac do you suggest if my first attempt is to start with one of my VCRs and the Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 to capture my video? I can test the quality of the captured video. If is still in need to corrections, I can try the AVToolbox AVT-8710 next.
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01-26-2016, 02:36 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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Perhaps a discussion of the right software that would be most beneficial to me could be discussed since I only own iMovie and Roxio toast 12 Titanium. I want to capture VHS video in the best format for later editing and producing DVDs later on (perhaps with a menu and chapters), and sharing my videos with family either through email or Dropbox, iPhone, Android, mp4, mov, etc., etc. Thanks.

Last edited by RDM56; 01-26-2016 at 02:44 PM. Reason: Duplicate post. Reposted after seeing error but original post went through anyway. Argh!
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01-26-2016, 04:29 PM
msgohan msgohan is offline
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That user review is too vague to be meaningful. It "cleaned my video up" and "it made a huge difference"? Can you picture what this person means when they say this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM56 View Post
My thoughts are to first see what results I can get using my VCRs and the Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV-330 to capture DV straight to my iMac.
This was literally the first suggestion I made. You can view it and see whether it meets your personal standards. You can post a sample of it and we can point out all the tiny little (and big) errors and you can wish you hadn't asked. It makes so much more sense than us guessing at your expectations.

You should be able to capture via Firewire to .dv or .mov using iMovie. The container doesn't matter; the essence is still DV. Try a Digital8 tape first before trying VCR input; it will be more straightforward since this window is designed around sending playback controls to the camcorder.
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01-26-2016, 06:50 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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Msgohan, about a year ago, as I recall, I successfully transferred video on a Digital 8 tape to a .mov file using my Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV330, iMovie and a Firewire cable. I was unsuccessful using my Sony Digital 8 DVR TRV330 to transfer from VHS into iMovie. I could view the video on my computer as it was playing in the VCR but not actually record the movie (the record button in iMovie was disabled, as I recall, but I need to refresh my memory again).

My concern is that I take the proper steps to digitize 106 VHS tapes and 74 Digital 8 tapes so that I don't have to repeat the process. I will try again and post my results later. I appreciate your help.
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01-27-2016, 05:47 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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As requested, I created a .mov file using my Sony DCR TRV350 to playback a Digital 8 tape. I connected a Firewire cable between the camera and my iMac and imported a small segment of video. Here is a sample.


Attached Files
File Type: mov 2009-12-25 13_00_44.mov (37.95 MB, 31 downloads)

Last edited by RDM56; 01-27-2016 at 05:52 PM. Reason: Forgot attachment
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01-27-2016, 07:40 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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After creating the .mov file from a Digital 8 tape, I then proceeded to connect the VCR to the Sony DCR TRV350 camera using the A/V connecting cable (mini plug --> RCA composite plugs). I also connected the iLink cable (Firewire) between the camera and Firewire 800 port on my iMac. Upon playing the VHS tape in the Sony SVO-2000 VCR, there was no display in the import window of iMovie until I flipped the switch on my camera back-and-forth between camera and VCR modes. Suddenly the video playing from the VCR appeared in the import window in iMovie. However, when I press the import button in iMovie, it plays the Digital 8 tape and begins recording it instead. I have attached a screen print of the instructions in the Sony manual.


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File Type: jpg Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 7.32.28 PM.jpg (106.1 KB, 10 downloads)
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  #13  
01-27-2016, 08:21 PM
latreche34 latreche34 is offline
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Have you tried removing tape from the camcorder?
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01-27-2016, 08:58 PM
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You are correct, when I removed the tape then when I press the import button the camera does not play the Digital 8 tape. However, the audio and video from the VCR is horribly intermittent in the iMovie import display screen on the iMac. The audio and video is fine on the camera's display screen. At first, the video displayed fine in the iMovie import screen while the VHS tape was playing, but after stopping and restarting the VCR tape, the video or audio became intermittent. Later, it settled down, but only to become intermittent again and again. Then the video in the import screen began rapidly flickering uncontrollably superimposing a previous scene between frames, etc. It is always the same scene that appears to have been captured and for some reason won't clear the cache/buffer.

I have attached a video taken of my computer monitor using my iPhone since I am unable to record the VHS video using the Sony DCR TRV350 and iMovie. You will see the flickering. In this video the audio is not intermittent but there is a pink area across the bottom of the video. The audio and video display fine on my Sony camera's display screen. The problem is happening between the DV output and iMovie.
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01-27-2016, 09:31 PM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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Another update: I closed the import window in iMovie and opened it again. This stopped the flickering. Both the video and audio were fine too. However, I still cannot capture the video playing from the VCR. When I press the import button, the word "recording" is displayed at the top of the import screen. It also displays the recording the time. When I stop the import, the recording time stops and goes away. The words "No Tape" reappear.

Unfortunately, a video clip does not appear to be captured. Unless it is being stored in a different location than the Digital 8 videos. I did not change the location for storing transferred videos. I assume that everything is defaulting to the same folder in the iMovie library. So, although it appears as if the VHS videos are being recorded, the reality is that they are not recorded.

Also, each time that there is a pause/change between video clips that were recorded on the VHS tape, the flickering worsens. The previous clip and the clip before it are additive. I had as many as 3 different images superimposing on each other. None of this flickering was occurring on my Sony camera's display. It was strictly confined to the import screen in iMovie.

Also, starting and stopping the import (i.e., recording) can induce more flickering. It can be better or worse depending on whether the recording is occurring or stopped.
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01-28-2016, 12:19 AM
latreche34 latreche34 is offline
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I don't have a mac I always stayed away from mac hardware and software for similar raisons, try another software that works with mac.
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01-28-2016, 01:20 AM
RDM56 RDM56 is offline
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Apparently there is something wrong with iMovie being able to capture video from my VHS tapes through my Sony DCR TRV350?

If anyone has recommendations on software that I can buy that works best with my Sony DCR TRV350 then let me know. This assumes, of course, that I need to capture in DV using the Sony video camera. Perhaps there is better hardware that will still let me use iMovie? Or perhaps using iMovie is a bad way to be doing this?

By the way, I can run Windows on my iMac if necessary. I just thought if there is a good setup for the iMac that I would run native through the iMac and try that first. I am following other advice in this forum to first see if I can capture video using my iMac and iMovie. By all means if there is software out there that runs on the iMac that someone likes or has experience using, please let me know, and what hardware they recommend too that works best with it, etc.
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01-28-2016, 09:05 AM
msgohan msgohan is offline
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Our most frequent posters don't use Mac for video capture, but there have been posts discussing some workflows by other users intent on using Mac. Try a search using both the Google option at the top of the page and the direct forum search.

Boot up Windows and try WinDV.

However, I must say that I did my very first hardware DV capture last night, and the results were worse than I had expected based on that PAL Video8 comparison thread. The quality loss was immediately apparent to me as soon as I viewed the resulting captured file, and the audio gradually drifted out of sync. A lossless capture done at the same time had fine sync despite 3 frame inserts (apparently my capture HDD is getting crowded and slow).

My source was Hi8, so some might say the higher theoretical resolution makes it harder to DV-compress, but I would say the possibly-higher noise level on VHS makes it similar or even more difficult.

I used a Sony DCR-TRV340. Your TRV350 is in the same mid-range of their product line as mine, just a year newer. I'm 90% sure they are identical in terms of analog playback and conversion. There's no reason to think they updated their DV compression chip, unless a reviewer or their ads from the time indicate that.

Planning to post samples, though perhaps on the other forum due to attachment limits here.
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01-28-2016, 09:25 AM
sanlyn sanlyn is offline
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msgohan, thanks for the notes. If you post samples elsewhere, we would all appreciate a link to the post. Thanks again. I've read where there are win7 updated drivers for WinDV, but the links I found go nowhere. I never used WinDV myself.

RDM56, thanks for the DV sample. It's looks fairly good to me. It could use a little cleanup, but nothing I have for post-processing would work in an iMac. You'd have to use Win7 to get the best tools, most of which are free.
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01-30-2016, 01:00 PM
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Is the video stored on my Digital 8 tapes an uncompressed raw video when using my Sony DCR TRV330 & 350 cameras?

If so, how much storage in GB is required per hour on digital tape? Is it approximately 82 to 85 GB on tape? Based on Wikipedia's calculation, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_video

"Digital video comprises a series of orthogonal bitmap digital images displayed in rapid succession at a constant rate. In the context of video these images are called frames.[2] We measure the rate at which frames are displayed in frames per second (FPS)."

"Since every frame is an orthogonal bitmap digital image it comprises a raster of pixels. If it has a width of W pixels and a height of H pixels we say that the frame size is WxH."

"Pixels have only one property, their color. The color of a pixel is represented by a fixed number of bits. The more bits the more subtle variations of colors can be reproduced. This is called the color depth (CD) of the video."

"An example video can have a duration (T) of 1 hour (3600sec), a frame size of 640x480 (WxH) at a color depth of 24bits and a frame rate of 25fps. This example video has the following properties:"

pixels per frame = 640 * 480 = 307,200
bits per frame = 307,200 * 24 = 7,372,800 = 7.37Mbits
bit rate (BR) = 7.37 * 25 = 184.25Mbits/sec
video size (VS)[3] = 184Mbits/sec * 3600sec = 662,400Mbits = 82,800Mbytes = 82.8Gbytes

The following link calculates the amount of space a given video format will take up on disk.

https://www.digitalrebellion.com/web...gth_type=hours

Select the NTSC DV format (Resolution is set for 720x480).

The calculation estimates 11 GB of space per hour on disk.

So, do my Sony DCR TRV330 & 350 cameras record 82.8 Gigabytes per hour on Digital 8 tapes and transferring the data to my hard drive take up 11 GB of space per hour as uncompressed video on my hard drive? Or does this calculation assume a compressed video? I don't know if this calculator assumes an AVI format for DV, etc.

Keep in mind, right or wrong, some forums that I have read say that AVI can store compressed or uncompressed video. Wikipedia states: "An AVI file may carry audio/visual data inside the chunks in virtually any compression scheme, including Full Frame (Uncompressed), Intel Real Time (Indeo), Cinepak, Motion JPEG, Editable MPEG, VDOWave, ClearVideo / RealVideo, QPEG, and MPEG-4 Video." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_Video_Interleave
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